Denmark Updates Insurance Claims Requirements

Posted by Eric Haun
Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Ships without P&I insurance for maritime claims must inform the Danish Maritime Authority about their insurance

Danish ships with a gross tonnage of or above 300 without a Certificate of Entry in a P&I Club from the international group of P&I clubs must inform the Danish Maritime Authority about alternative insurance for maritime claims before March 31, 2014.

Danish ships with a gross tonnage of or above 300 must carry a certificate confirming that insurance has been taken out to cover maritime claims. The certificates are issued by the insurance companies and are subject to the general control of ships and certificates. Most ships have a recognized Certificate of Entry. In case the ship does not have a Certificate of Entry, the Danish Maritime Authority must be informed about the insurance taken out before 31 March 2014.

What is a recognized Certificate of Entry?
The Danish Maritime Authority recognizes a Certificate of Entry stating that the ship’s P&I insurance has been issued by a member of the international group of P&I clubs and containing information about insurance pursuant to sections 3 and 4 of order no. 1259 of December 16, 2011. Therefore, Danish ships with a valid certificate of this type need not take any further steps vis-à-vis the Danish Maritime Authority.

In case the ship does not have a Certificate of Entry

Danish ships that do not have a Certificate of Entry must once a year inform the Danish Maritime Authority about the insurance taken out. For 2014 the Danish Maritime Authority must be informed before 31 March 2014. Information about the insurance taken out is to be inserted in the reporting form and subsequently be forwarded to the Danish Maritime Authority by soeretligekrav@dma.dk.

Foreign ships

The requirement for a certificate also applies to foreign ships with a gross tonnage of or above 300 calling at or departing from a Danish port or any other place of loading or unloading in Denmark or in the Danish continental shelf area or carrying out activities in Danish territorial waters. Foreign ships do not have to inform the Danish Maritime Authority about the insurance taken out, but control of whether insurance has been taken out is part of the Danish Maritime Authority’s general inspection of foreign ships.

dma.dk
 

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