Researchers Say Wind Enough to Satisfy World Power Demands

News Release
Wednesday, October 24, 2012
Photo courtesy of Stanford University

Researchers used a sophisticated climate model to show wind can meet many times the world's total power demand by 2030.

If the world is to shift to clean energy, electricty generated by the wind will play a major role – and there is more than enough wind for that, according to new research from Stanford and the University of Delaware.

Researchers at Stanford University's School of Engineering and the University of Delaware developed the most sophisticated weather model available to show that not only is there plenty of wind over land and near to shore to provide half the world's power, but there is enough to exceed the total demand by several times, even after accounting for reductions in wind speed caused by turbines.

'The careful siting of wind farms will minimize costs and the overall impacts of a global wind infrastructure on the environment,' said Mark Z. Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford. 'But, as these results suggest, the saturation of wind power availability will not limit a clean-energy economy.'

The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by Mark Z. Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford, and Cristina Archer, an associate professor of geography and physical ocean science and engineering at the University of Delaware.


 

Maritime Reporter June 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Technology

SHIPPINGInsight 2014 Agenda Announced

Annual Conference, Exhibition and Networking Event Brings Together Shipowners and Technology Companies to Address Practical Solutions for Efficient Operations The

VIDEO: HMS Queen Elizabeth Floats Out

A timelapse video of HMS Queen Elizabeth floating out of her dock for the first time is now available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0ZjQz9vEKw. The float out of the 65,

Hyundai Heavy Industries Develops HiCASS

Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (HHI) announced today that it developed Hyundai Intelligent Collision Avoidance Support System (HiCASS) for the first time in

Energy

Statoil, Repsol, ExxonMobil Win Colombian Offshore License

Statoil announced today that it has been awarded interest in the COL4 license offshore Colombia in the Caribbean Sea in the 2014 Colombia Licensing Round, along with Respol and ExxonMobil.

Freeport Says Indonesia Exports Could Resume Soon

Freeport-McMoRan Inc said on Wednesday it expects to "imminently" sign an agreement with Indonesia that would enable it to immediately resume copper concentrate

Trading Dutch Well Placed to Pursue Russia Sanctions

The seafaring Netherlands prides itself on being a trading nation, reluctant to let politics get in the way of a good deal. But since the downing, allegedly

Wind Power

Harnessing the Wind for Auxiliary Propulsion

Finnish marine engineering company Norsepower Oy Ltd. announced that it will bring to the commercial maritime market an auxiliary wind propulsion solution aimed

NJ Congressmen Supports Offshore Wind Proposal

Congressman Frank Pallone has issued the following statement in response to the Department of the Interior’s announcement of the proposed lease sale for nearly 344,

Imtech Equips HelWin bèta with HVAC System

On June 14, the HelWin bèta platform left on a barge from the Heerema Fabrication Group's (HFG) yard in Zwijndrecht for Schiedam to complete outstanding work. Last week,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Naval Architecture Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1806 sec (6 req/sec)