New Report Reveals World Fish Stocks Crisis

Press Release
Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Head of international ocean conservation organization, Oceana, responds to alarming new report on the status of the world's fisheries.

Andrew F. Sharpless, CEO of Oceana, issues the following statement about a new report: Status and Solutions for the World's Unassessed Fisheries.

"This study finally lays to rest the question of whether or not the world's fisheries are in crisis – they are. As the authors report, more than half of the world's fisheries are in decline. And as they point out, worst hit are small scale fisheries which are critical for feeding hungry people all around the world.

We believe that this report provides a clear call to action. We need to quickly put in place responsible management measures in the countries that control most of the world's wild seafood.  As the study finds, putting in place these measures would allow depleted stocks to recover to sustainable levels and could result in future catches that are up to 40 percent larger than are predicted if current unsustainable fishing practices continue.

We know from past experience all around the world – including in the 'assessed fisheries' described by the authors – that putting in place better fisheries management allows fisheries to rebound. And we agree with the authors' prescription for these measures – science-based quotas and habitat protection. We do believe that they (and the world's fishery managers) should place a great emphasis on reducing bycatch which is critical to the future of our wild fish stocks.

One other critical point not covered in this study is that putting in place these management measures does not take an international treaty. Just 25 countries control 75% of the world's fish catch and can – through their own legal systems – put in place the policies that can allow fisheries to recover.

The world has a moral obligation to act on the findings of this study as it would enable the sea to feed 400 million hungry people living in major fishing nations and would help offset the projected dramatic increase in demand for protein from a world population that is forecasted to rise to 9 billion people by 2050."
 

 

 




 

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