New Science Vessel for USCG Academy

Posted by Eric Haun
Friday, November 08, 2013
Michael J. Greeley Spirit of ’61

Viking Welding & Response Marine, Inc. have recently completed a 36’ research vessel, which is being used in United States Coast Guard Academy coursework this fall. Christened the Michael J. Greeley Spirit of ’61, the vessel was largely funded by gifts from the Academy class of 1961 and named after a class member who passed away while a cadet at the Academy.

The Michael J. Greeley adds capacity, capability and versatility to the marine research and lab work offerings of the Academy.  With more than 170 square feet of open working deck, 1,500 pound capacity A-frame with hydraulic winch and two 500 pound capacity davits with hydraulic capstans, hauling and sampling is more efficient and versatile than on the smaller Academy boats.  For lab and sorting work there are two 4’ x 3’ portable, flow-though tables. The pilothouse interior features counter space for computers and a 19” diameter thru-hull well for various sampling and sonar instruments. Power is twin Cummins 220 hp diesels with electronic controls and monitoring, producing over twenty knots top speed.

Designed by Response Marine, Inc. the boat is very similar to other 36 footers designed for the University of Connecticut and Michigan Technological University. Plans and construction were inspected and approved under Subchapter T regulations and Simplified Stability tests were conducted both with and without lifted weights.  Without lifts the vessel meets stability for 19 passengers on a coastwise route. With lifted weights, the vessel meets stability for 19 passengers on a partially protected route.

Builder: Viking Welding & Fabrication, LLC , Kensington, N.H.
Designer: Response Marine, Inc., Newburyport, Mass.
Hull type: Modified Vee
-Transom deadrise: 7°
-Midship deadrise:  17°
-Cutwater deadrise:  60°   
Hull construction: Welded aluminum, 5083 & 5086 H116
-Bottom: 0.25”
-Topsides: 3/16”
-Keel: 0.75”  
-Chine: 0.375”
-Bottom stringers: 0.3125”
Mission: Marine science
LOA (hull): 35' 9"
LWL: 33’
Beam (hull): 12' 9", not including rub rails
BWL: 12’
Draft (hull):  2'
Displacement: Dockside, full fluids - 18,000 lbs; Heavy operating, 20 persons - 21,700 lbs
Main propulsion: Twin Cummins  QSD 2.8, 220 hp, w/ Twin Disc MG5050A transmissions
Shaft and prop: 1.5” Aquamet 22 w/ 20” x 17”, Nibral four blade
Crew: One-two
Fuel capacity: 230 gallons
Max speed: 23 knots, burning 26 gal per hour
Cruise speed: 15 knots, burning 12 gal per hour
Range at cruise: 258 nm w/ 10% reserve
Outfitting:
-A-Frame: 1,500# w/ 1,500# hydraulic winch
-Davit: Two Radial Arm 500# w/ hydraulic capstans
-Hydraulics: Engine driven via starboard transmission
-Transducer well: 19” Diameter well with external fairing
Aux. equipment:
-Anchor: Danforth 20H w/ 15’ of 0.375” chain & 150’ of 0.625” rode
-Heat: Heatercraft via engine coolant circuit
-Inverter/charger: MassCombi, 12/120V, 4000 watt
-Liferaft: Zodiac, 20 person
-Navigation and sonar: Lowrance HDS-10 w/ 4G radar
-Radios: Icom w/ hailer
-Shorepower: 30 amp w/ Isolation Transformer
-Trim tabs: Bennett, 12 volt Hydraulic
Approvals:
-Plans and Construction: USCG approved under Subchapter T
-Stability: Simplified Stability Tests completed and passed for: 19 passengers + 1 crew for partially protected route, while lifting 500# at leeward davit & 1,500# at A-frame; 19 passengers + 1 crew for unprotected, coastwise route, with no davit or A-frame lifting

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