Sentinel to Conduct Maritime Security Study

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

(Source: Press Release)

Sentinel Maritime has been appointed by the European Commission Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport to study the impact (including the financial consequences) of extending security measures to ships which currently do not fall within the scope of SOLAS Chapter XI/2 and the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. 

The Study has been given the name “Project SecureSeas.” The study is, in part, a response to the growing concern that such ships may pose as serious or more serious a threat than ships currently within the scope of the ISPS Code. Apart from the terrorist attacks carried out by “non-ISPS” vessels on the “USS Cole” and “MT Limburg”, or their use in the attack on Mumbai, “non-ISPS” ships are frequently used in human trafficking as well as smuggling drugs and contraband.

As a first step, Sentinel has been tasked to assess the current “state of play” in the EU Member States as far as non-SOLAS ships are concerned. The study will collate information on member state compliance with Article 3.3 of Regulation 725/2004, procedures for registering vessels, the means for reporting security concerns and the numbers and distribution of vessels which could be covered by any new regulations. The study will also examine the possibility of introducing a computerized register of ships which might include recreational/pleasure ships as well as commercial vessels.

Sentinel will also study the potential application within the EU of the guidelines on the security aspects of the operation of non-ISPS vessels adopted by the International Maritime Organisation on 22 December 2008. In large part, these guidelines use the framework of the ISPS Code to recommend best practice for non-ISPS operators and by security authorities when dealing with non-ISPS vessels. The guidelines consist of two parts, the first part for IMO Member States and other for authorities responsible for administering non-ISPS ships and the second part for operators of non-ISPS  vessels and related facilities. These guidelines recognize four distinct categories of vessels, each with different risk profiles and best practice risk management procedures.

1. commercial non-passenger and special purpose vessels;

2. passenger vessels;

3. fishing vessels; and

4. pleasure craft.

The study is placing a special emphasis on recreational/pleasure ships with a view to assessing the impact and feasibility of changes to the registration process of non-SOLAS ships, and the benefits offered by a computerised database for the registration of non-SOLAS ships.

Given the vast number of non-commercial pleasure boats, extending security requirements to these smaller vessels would have a significant impact on a whole gamut of stakeholders and Sentinel is reaching out to the boating community for its input. There is a new website being launched, which will allow stakeholders to share their views and to add to the body of knowledge available. By taking part and sharing data and information through www.secureseas.net the shipping, boating and maritime industry stakeholders within the EU can help protect their borders while safeguarding their commercial interests and their rights to the boating experience they deserve.

Interested parties should contact Raymond Gibbons at Sentinel Maritime Ltd - r.gibbons@sentinelmaritime.com or 01993 822303 for more information.


People & Company News

MN100: MarineCFO

The Company: Founded in 1992, UA Business Solutions was a pioneer in the field of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and an early Microsoft Partner. The ERP evolution

MN100: All American Marine, Inc.

The Company: All American Marine Inc. was founded in 1987 and specializes in the construction of custom tailored aluminum boats from 30 to 150 feet LOA. Today,

Five Minutes with Paul Switzer

Five minutes with Paul Switzer - Manager, Shipbuilding & Offshore, Viega   For readers not familiar with Viega, please give a ‘birds eye’ view, putting the company

Finance

Canada May Ask Far-offshore Drillers to Pay Extra

Canada may ask oil companies to contribute to the hundreds of millions of dollars or more the country has to pay to an international body if they drill far offshore,

European Owners Lead in Buying Up Secondhand Tonnage

With European owners leading the pack in buying up vessels, the sale and purchase market appears to have been notably active in recent years, reveals Clarkson Research Services Limited.

Monjasa Bags Credit Facility from Société Générale

Danish bunker fuel supplier and shipping firm Monjasa has signed a credit facility with French bank Société Générale for USD 80 million.    A statement from

Maritime Security

Philippines: Sea Dispute Won't Shift Ties with China, U.S.

The Philippines' territorial dispute with China over the South China Sea has not caused Manila to rebalance diplomatic ties with either its ally, the United States,

USCG Evaluates Comms Equipment in Alaska

Coast Guard Research and Development Center evaluates state-of-the-art communications equipment and Next Generation Incident Command System in Alaska   At nearly 663,

TSA Boosts Maritime Security in a Big Way

Though most visible to the general public for its work at America’s airports, the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) also helps to secure the country’s

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Port Authority Salvage Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0942 sec (11 req/sec)