Today in U.S. Naval History: September 3

Posted by Eric Haun
Wednesday, September 03, 2014

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 3

1782 - As a token of gratitude for French aid during American Revolution, the U.S. gives America (first ship-of-the-line built by U.S.) to France to replace a French ship lost in Boston.

1783 - Signing of Treaty of Paris ends American Revolution

1885 - First classes at U.S. Naval War College begin

1925 - Crash of rigid airship Shenandoah near Byesville, Ohio

1943 - American landings on Lae and Salamaua

1944 - First combat employment of a missile guided by radio and television takes place when Navy drone Liberator, controlled by Ensign James M. Simpson in a PV, flew to attack German submarine pens on Helgoland Island.

1945 - Japanese surrender Wake Island in ceremony on board USS Levy (DE-162)

For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.

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