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Monday, December 5, 2016

Litigation Can Cost Shipbrokers an Arm & a Leg

April 16, 2014

File photo CCL3

File photo CCL3

A survey of London solicitors by specialist intermediaries insurer ITIC has highlighted the high cost of litigation for shipbrokers and others seeking judgment in the English courts, reports trade association Maritime London.

Indemnity insurers ITIC gave a panel of London solicitors – all of whom had previously been instructed on cases involving ITIC members – a hypothetical claim scenario involving a broker which had been cut out of commission. The solicitors were asked to estimate the costs that the broker would have to pay to take the matter to court. The average estimate of the costs was £177,163.

The claim scenario given to the solicitors was based on actual cases financed by ITIC under its debt collection cover. It involved a sale and purchase broker which claimed it had introduced principals and performed the original groundwork for the deal. The broker claimed that it had then been cut out at the last minute and replaced by another broker who had simply ‘tied up the loose ends.” The sellers denied that they had any commitment to the broker.

ITIC says: “A dispute of this nature is likely to involve no more than a couple of witnesses and an expert giving evidence on each side. If, at GBP177,163, the cost of winning was expensive, then losing would be even more so. Under the English legal system, a losing party is responsible for its opponent’s costs. The solicitors estimated that the likely additional liability if the broker lost would have amounted to GBP139,687. This would have brought the total costs liability faced by the broker to GBP316,850.”

ITIC says that, although few cases proceed all the way to trial and many will settle at an early stage without the need for formal legal proceedings, it is important brokers have a sufficient level of cover to fund litigation. ITIC’s debt collection cover pays not only for the broker’s own costs but also for the potential liability to opponents.
 
Source: Maritime London

 

 



 
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