Chinese Shipbuilder Plans Next Component of 'Oceanaut' Station

Xinua
Thursday, August 09, 2012

China Shipbuilding Industry Corp. (CSIC) is developing a manned submersible for dives to 4,500 meters (14,764 ft).

The move comes as part of a greater plan for the nation to eventually build a deep sea station where submersibles can dock and oceanauts can work.

CSIC, builders of the Jiaolong manned submersible, which made record dives to more than 7,000 meters in the Pacific Ocean's Mariana Trench, said that the submersible has returned to its test base since completing deep sea diving missions, and it will be handed over for use after maintenance. The vessel will be used to conduct scientific research next year, the Beijing-based state-owned company said.

According to a report released at a recent press conference, CSIC, one of the world's top 500 companies, saw its revenues and profits grow 14 percent and 10 percent, respectively, in 2011, despite a crisis-stricken shipbuilding sector.

 


Shipbuilding

Matson Orders Two ConRo Ships from NASSCO

Matson Navigation Company, Inc., a subsidiary of container shipper Matson, Inc., has signed a contract with U.S. shipbuilder General Dynamics NASSCO to build two

MN100: Conrad Shipyard

The Company: Conrad Shipyard was established in 1948 and is headquartered in Morgan City, Louisiana. The company designs, builds and overhauls tugboats, ferries,

Heavy Lifting: Giant Pipe Racks Shipped for New FPSO

From Brazil to China and then back to Brazil, five pipe racks and three modules weighing a total of 1,871.51 metric tons and measuring 24,075 m³ will be transported

Marine Science

Global Climate Change Threatens Papahānaumokuākea Marine

Despite its remote location in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument faces a looming threat of global climate change that

SC Fisheries Research Vessel Repowered

A fisheries research vessel operated by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), was recently repowered with new eco-friendly fuel-efficient engines from Volvo Penta.

Fighting Barnacle Buildup with Biology

New research solves a mystery behind the gunk that sticks to the bottoms of ships.   The coating of barnacles and other growth along the bottoms of vessels is more than just an eyesore.

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0800 sec (12 req/sec)