U.S. Port Dredging Project Hindered by Historic Shipwreck

Navy Times
Sunday, May 06, 2012

An historic Civil War shipwreck blocks dredging deep-water access channel to Port of Savannah container ship terminal

Before government engineers can deepen one of the nation’s busiest seaports to accommodate future trade, they first need to remove a $14 million obstacle from the past — a Confederate warship rotting on the Savannah River bottom for nearly 150 years.

Confederate troops scuttled the ironclad Georgia to prevent its capture by Gen. William T. Sherman when his Union troops took Savannah in December 1864. It’s been on the river bottom ever since.

Now, the Civil War shipwreck sits in the way of a government agency’s $653 million plan to deepen the waterway that links the nation’s fourth-busiest container port to the Atlantic Ocean. The ship’s remains are considered so historically significant that dredging the river is prohibited within 50 feet of the wreckage.

The Army Corps of Engineers plans to raise and preserve what’s left of the Georgia. The agency’s final report on the project estimated the cost to taxpayers at $14 million. The work could start next year on the painstaking effort.

Leaving the shipwreck in place is not an option: Officials say the harbor must be deepened to accommodate supersize cargo ships coming through an expanded Panama Canal in 2014 — ships that will bring valuable revenue to the state and would otherwise go to other ports.

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