Retrofit Solutions for Exhaust Gas and Water Cleaning

MarineLink.com
Monday, November 04, 2013

Upcoming environmental regulations will affect existing vessels, and as a consequence there is a growing demand for exhaust gas cleaning and ballast water treatment systems.

Retrofitting both scrubbers and ballast water management systems is – or will soon be – required for many ships to comply with regulations. There are retrofit solutions available across all ship types, from cruise vessels to merchant and offshore ships. Space requirement is usually the most critical factor when planning and executing a retrofit project but Wärtsilä has found solutions to the challenge.

The execution of retrofit projects for both scrubbers and ballast water management systems requires similar types of planning and engineering. There are typically three things that are analysed when planning a retrofit of exhaust gas or a water cleaning system. First, the space requirements of the system are analysed, taking into consideration the available space in the vessel. Next, engineers study the impact of the additional systems in terms of their weight, ship stability in case of scrubber systems, structural modifications, and relocation of any existing equipment inside the ship. Finally, engineers assess how to further optimise the installation method, with the aim of minimising costs and downtime during installation.

“Retrofitting exhaust gas or ballast water cleaning systems is feasible for all ship types – but how it is done can vary depending on the ship type. Finding space for the system is the most common challenge. When it comes to scrubber installations, we, for example, sometimes need to make changes in the funnel shape or rethink the use of spaces in the vessel to create more room for cleaning systems. However, we have not come across any project in which retrofitting would not be possible. It is just a matter of identifying the best solution or compromise with the ship owner,” says Leonardo Sonzio, Director Retrofit, Wärtsilä Environmental Solutions.

According to Sonzio, the biggest cost factors in retrofits are the equipment, and the installation operations and material. Generally, the cost of the equipment varies depending on the type and size of the ship. The installation cost depends on the extent of modifications to the existing ship, and the time needed at the dry dock.  As a rule of thumb, equipment and installation each represent forty percent of the total price for a turnkey retrofit; the remaining twenty percent is related to engineering, project management, site management, logistics and class approval costs.

“We have delivered or are in the process of delivering dozens of new build and retrofit projects for scrubbers. These include tankers, bulk carriers, container vessels, ro-ros, cruise vessels and ferries. More and more inquiries are coming in from ship owners. Also, we are expecting the demand for ballast water management systems to grow steadily, and we have experience with both new build and retrofit cases. Our approach to a successful retrofit project is true partnership and thorough engineering and planning before the contract is even signed. This enables us to manage risks in close cooperation with our customer,” Sonzio explains.

Wärtsilä ballast water management systems use a two stage approach involving mechanical filtration of organisms followed by a choice of either UV treatment  or electro-chlorination. The Wärtsilä portfolio of scrubbers includes three configurations: seawater open loop scrubbers, closed loop scrubbers, and hybrid scrubbers. All three configurations include a wash water treatment plant to clean the effluents before discharge into the sea with no risk of harm to the environment.

Wärtsilä said it is the only company capable of providing both scrubber and ballast water systems combined with turnkey retrofit services. With its professional project organization, Wärtsilä is able to manage all kinds of retrofit projects worldwide. Wärtsilä’s global services network supports customers throughout the lifecycle of the ship.

The most evident approaching regulations for existing vessels are the IMO Marpol Annex VI focusing on sulphur oxide (SOx) emissions, and the IMO Global Ballast Water Convention.

Maritime Reporter November 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Ship Repair & Conversion

Keeping to the Schedule in the Pacific Northwest

When a tightly scheduled repower for the Kodiak-based trawler Sea Mac in early December took a very bad turn, Mike Fourtner used his 25 years of fishing experience

Optimarin ,Goltens Ink BWT Retrofit Agreement

Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) specialist Optimarin and Goltens, a provider of engineering and installation solutions for the shipping industry, have signed a nonexclusive

China's Scrap Yards Apply for EU Regulation

China's Zhoushan Changhong International Ship Recycling and Jiang Xiagang Changjiang Ship Recycling Yard, world’s two biggest ship scrap yards by capacity,  have

Environmental

NZ Report: Human Error to Blame for Rena Grounding

New Zealand's Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) published its final report into the grounding of containership Rena in October 2011. The TAIC’s

Costa Rica Approves APM Terminals Project

Port operator APM Terminals, a unit of Denmark's A.P. Moller-Maersk, said on Friday Costa Rica's environment agency had approved the construction of its Moin Container Terminal project.

NOAA: US to See More Floods from Sea Level Rise

Most of U.S. coast may see 30 or more days a year of floods up to 2 feet above high tides. By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas are likely to be threatened

Marine Power

Keeping to the Schedule in the Pacific Northwest

When a tightly scheduled repower for the Kodiak-based trawler Sea Mac in early December took a very bad turn, Mike Fourtner used his 25 years of fishing experience

New Chinese Shipyard Launches First Ship

The new shipyard facility of Honghua Offshore Oil & Gas Equipment Company in Jiangsu, China, has launched its first ship, an IMT982 Platform Supply Vessel. The vessel,

Multraship Buys Three More Tugboats from Damen

Multraship and Damen Shipyards Group agreed on three new ASD (Azimuth Stern Drive) Tugs, all for delivery to Multraship in 2015. After delivery in Vietnam, scheduled

News

Port Workers in Argentine Grain Hub End Strike

Port workers in part of the Argentine grains hub of Rosario lifted a work stoppage on Friday, only a day after they went on strike over demands for higher year-end bonuses, a union official said.

Madsen to Chair Norway’s Research Council Executive Board

Henrik O. Madsen appointed chairman of the executive board of the Research Council of Norway   DNV GL president and CEO Henrik O. Madsen was appointed as chairman

Larger Tankers May Offer Better Return Chances

Investors looking for returns in the tanker markets can invest their capital in a variety of ways. Should an owner invest in a VLCC or an Aframax? How about an

Marine Equipment

Maritime Reporter @ 75: The Daily Cartoon

Maritime Reporter & Engineering News was founded by John J. O'Malley (1905-1980) in 1939, and today ranks as the world's largest audited trade publication in the world serving the maritime industry,

Keeping to the Schedule in the Pacific Northwest

When a tightly scheduled repower for the Kodiak-based trawler Sea Mac in early December took a very bad turn, Mike Fourtner used his 25 years of fishing experience

Damen Outfitting First of Nine Bahamas Patrol Boats

The first of nine Damen Stan Patrol 3007s ordered by the Royal Bahamas Defense Force has arrived at Damen Shipyards Gorinchem in the Netherlands for outfitting.

Vessels

Damen Outfitting First of Nine Bahamas Patrol Boats

The first of nine Damen Stan Patrol 3007s ordered by the Royal Bahamas Defense Force has arrived at Damen Shipyards Gorinchem in the Netherlands for outfitting.

MARAD Publishes US ATB, ITB Database

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) released what it is calling a first-of-its-kind public database that chronicles U.S.-flagged, privately owned domestic

New Chinese Shipyard Launches First Ship

The new shipyard facility of Honghua Offshore Oil & Gas Equipment Company in Jiangsu, China, has launched its first ship, an IMT982 Platform Supply Vessel. The vessel,

Ballast Water Treatment

Optimarin ,Goltens Ink BWT Retrofit Agreement

Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) specialist Optimarin and Goltens, a provider of engineering and installation solutions for the shipping industry, have signed a nonexclusive

ICS Alters Position on Ballast Water Convention

The global trade association for merchant shipowners, the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), has modified its stance towards the ratification by governments

Six Japanese Bulkers Fitted with BWMS

Wärtsilä ballast water management systems will enable Japanese bulk carriers to achieve compliance with environmental regulations   Six new bulk carriers being

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Navigation Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Simulators Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2144 sec (5 req/sec)