Floating Offshore Wind Turbines: DNV KEMA Set Standards

SeaDiscovery.com
Tuesday, June 25, 2013
Johan Sandberg: Photo credit DNV KEMA

As demand for wind energy increases, offshore deployments are continuing to move into deeper waters.

DNV KEMA has released its new standard for floating offshore wind turbine structures that will help ensure safety and reliability in floating wind turbines, and give the nascent floating-turbine sector the confidence to continue its development to commercial maturity.

“A prerequisite for the industry to continue to grow and develop effectively is development of design standards…they are essential to ensure a consistent and appropriate level of safety in design, construction and operation of floating wind turbines. This will increase confidence in the technology and hopefully make more projects bankable.” – Johan Sandberg, head of renewable energy at DNV KEMA, Norway and project sponsor.

In response to the fast-expanding offshore wind market, DNV KEMA, the energy arm of DNV, has developed a new standard that will help accelerate the development of a new generation of floating offshore wind turbines by establishing design requirements for the floating structure and related systems. According to Johan Sandberg, head of renewable energy at DNV KEMA, Norway and project sponsor, the standard covers a broad range of issues, including safety philosophy and design principles; site conditions, loads and response; materials and corrosion protection; structural design; design of anchor foundations; floating stability; station keeping; control and mechanical systems; transport and installation; in-service inspection and cable design.

“As demand for wind energy increases, we predict offshore deployments will continue to move into deeper waters and, consequently, there’s a need to establish design standards that will help ensure safety, reliability, and confidence in future wind turbines,” he says. “To that end, the new standard, developed as a Joint Industry Project (JIP) with 10 participating companies, aims to spur progress in floating offshore wind through a framework for best practices and technical requirements, plus producing guidance for design, construction and in-service inspection.”

Sandberg notes that many densely populated coastal areas around the world are not suitable for traditional bottom-fixed offshore wind turbines. In other areas, the shallow water coast is already developed or challenging seabed conditions makes bottom-fixed offshore wind unsuitable. Also, local communities have been known to oppose projects due to negative visual impacts.

“Recent successful deployments of full-scale prototype configurations have demonstrated that floating wind turbines can be a viable alternative and the market is taking notice. Several companies and research institutes worldwide are already engaged in developing research programs, pilot projects and even planning for commercial development of floating wind farms,” he says.

For various reasons, countries like Japan and the U.S. have also made offshore wind energy one focus of their energy policy. According to Sandberg a tricky point in the development of offshore wind around the coastal belts of these countries, like the majority of coastal belts around the world, is that water depths can range from dozens to hundreds of metres. This situation demands new technology so in both Japan and the U.S., ideas are turning to floating structures for wind turbines.

“It is now time to take the next step: standardization. A new standard can increase the confidence in the industry and hopefully attract new investors to this new renewable energy technology,” says Sandberg. “The decades of expertise that DNV has amassed in the standardization of maritime offshore oil & gas, and onshore and offshore wind is invaluable for the development of standards for floating offshore wind structures.”

The new standard for floating wind structures, devised under DNV KEMA’s leadership through project manager Anne Lene Hopstad and technical specialist Knut Ronold supplements the developed DNV Guideline for Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Structures, and the existing standard DNV-OS-J101 Design of Offshore Wind Turbine Structures.

The 10 participants in the JIP study are Statoil, Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Sasebo Heavy Industries, STX Offshore & Shipbuilding, Navantia, Gamesa, Iberdrola, Alstom Wind, Glosten Associates and Principle Power.



 

Maritime Reporter July 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Technology

BAE Systems Awards Software Contract to SENER

The Spanish company SENER, Ingeniería y Sistemas S.A has closed a contract with U.K.-based BAE Systems PLC for the integration between FORAN CAD/CAM System and

Carnival’s Costa Brand Orders Two LNG Cruise Ships

Costa’s two new cruise ships will be the largest ever built based on guest capacity; Costa will join sister brand AIDA Cruises in building the first-ever cruise

New Load Measurement Solution for Port of Dampier

Strainstall designs and delivers a load measurement solution for the world’s largest floating wharf at Port of Dampier.   Strainstall, part of James Fisher and Sons plc,

Maritime Safety

Self-lubricating Bearing Polymer: Safe, Easy to Machine

Many plastics and metallic alloys present machining challenges as some deform and are difficult to maintain exacting tolerances, while others require strict and

Diesel Spill in Houston Ship Channel

A small section of the Upper Houston Ship Channel was closed Tuesday morning after a report of 1,000 gallons of diesel entered Greens Bayou from a cement facility, the U.

BSEE Updates Hurricane Reporting Requirements

BSEE is providing updated guidance for the current and future hurricane seasons through a Notice to Lessees (NTL) released July 27, 2015. NTL 2015-G02 clarifies

Classification Societies

ABS Grants AIP for Jensen’s LNG ATB Design

A Jensen Maritime-designed, liquefied natural gas (LNG)-bunkering articulated tug-barge (ATB) has been granted approval in principle (AIP) by classification society American Bureau of Shipping (ABS).

New Standard for Offshore O&G Project by DNV GL Led JIP is Cost Saving

Variations in owner, operator and regulatory requirements during engineering and construction phases at South Korean shipyards present a huge challenge for operators and drive up costs.

The Maritime Launch of Big Data

It’s no coincidence that Class standard bearer DNV GL’s incoming group chief exec, Remi Eriksen, is a former telecoms engineer who knows his way around Houston (IT) and Singapore (yards).

Wind Power

Offshore Wind Shift to Drive Vessel Services Cooperation

Evolving procurement processes for U.K. Round 3 offshore wind farms will require a greater number of work streams, personnel with new and differing skills, and

ABB hands over Germany’s DolWin1

DolWin1 integrates 800 megawatts (MW) of clean energy into the German transmission grid ABB, the leading power and automation technology group, has successfully

NOIA Applauds RI Offshore Wind Project

National Ocean Industries Association (NOIA) president Randall Luthi issued a statement congratulating “steel in the water” for Deep Water Wind’s Block Island Wind Farm,

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Navigation Pipelines Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Repair Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1708 sec (6 req/sec)