Russian Navy Submarines to be More Anonymous

Barents Observer
Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Russian navy will reintroduce Soviet practice and remove control tower emblems and markings to make identification more difficult.

The huge and highly visible emblems in the front on the submarines’ towers make it too easy to figure out which of them sailing or not, believes the main command of the Russian Navy. Now, the order has been given to paint over the emblems and numbers on the submarine superstructure, reports the Barents Observer.

All Russian submarines have different naval numbers and names. The coat of arms with the name on the signs in front of the tower easily identifies the vessel. These signs will now be painted over, especially for submarines on duty testing weapons. This is the same practice that the Soviet navy used for their submarines in the Cold War area in the 80ies.

Source: Barents Observer

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