100 Years With Diesel - Successor Ready

press release
Friday, February 17, 2012

Exactly 100 years ago, the Danish ship Selandia set an example for international shipping as a pioneer within CO2 reduction. Now we are ready for yet another environmental quantum leap.


The most distinctive feature of the M/S Selandia was the fact that it had no funnel emitting black smoke up into the sky. The M/S Selandia marked the beginning of the end of steamships. As the first ocean-going ship, she sailed on diesel instead of coal. A technological revolution built at the B&W shipyard. And at the same time, a major gain for the environment. On 17 February 2012, Selandia's 100th anniversary can be celebrated. And exactly at the centenary for the change from steam to diesel, the marine engine of the future is ready to further reduce CO2 emissions.


100 years ago, the M/S Selandia took the first step into a globalised world by initiating The East Asiatic Company's diesel-powered line service to the Far East. Diesel engines were more cost-effective to sail with. They were an improvement of the working environment on board. And even though it was not such a big issue then, Selandia had a major impact on CO2 shipping emissions. In 1912, when the ships' steam engines were replaced by diesel engines, CO2 emissions per produced kilowatt-hour were reduced dramatically. As early as in 1920, CO2 emissions were reduced by more than 50 per cent. Throughout the next 50 years, diesel engines and steam engines competed to become the most efficient to reduce CO2 emissions. The diesel engine won, says Hans Otto Kristensen, senior researcher at the Institute for Mechanical Technology at The Technical University of Denmark.


We still see cargo vessels all over the world with large diesel engines designed in Copenhagen, at MAN Diesel & Turbo's headquarters at Teglholmen in Copenhagen. MAN Diesel & Turbo is the former B&W. Here, the engine of the future has just been developed and is ready to launch a new epoch. Instead of oil, the engine runs on liquefied natural gas, which is good news for the ambitious, but important global goals for CO2 reduction.
 

Over the past years, natural gas has turned out to be an attractive fuel for marine engines, as a gas engine has an approximately 25 per cent lower CO2 emission level than a corresponding diesel engine. At the same time, a change from diesel to natural gas will solve the problems with sulphur pollution, so that the strict requirements on sulphur emissions coming into force in 2015 can be easily met, says Hans Otto Kristensen, senior researcher at the Institute for Mechanical Technology at The Technical University of Denmark.
 

Something implies that it takes 100 years to revolutionise the way a large ship is propelled. Precisely 200 years ago, in 1812, the Scottish "The Comet" sailed as the first steamship in open sea. Exactly 100 years later, Selandia initiated the diesel era with her maiden voyage to Bangkok. And in 2012, the LNG engine is ready to take over.
 

Exactly 100 years after Selandia excited the world, we are proud to still be at the forefront of the technological development and to leave our substantial mark on the international shipping industry. Recently, we developed the ME-GI gas engine, which is ready to start a new era and reduce CO2 emissions further. In my opinion, the future is liquefied natural gas, says Thomas Knudsen, Head of Business Unit Low Speed, MAN Diesel & Turbo. The centenary of Selandia is celebrated on 17 February 2012 with a special exhibition at DieselHouse in Copenhagen and the premiere of the documentary "The Ship that Changed the World - M/S Selandia" from Chroma Film.
2/2012

Maritime Reporter June 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

Kleven Shipbuilding Wins IES Pioneer Contract

Norway’s Kleven announced it has signed a shipbuilding contract with Malaysian based joint venture company IES Pioneer Ltd. The vessel is of Norwegian design

Sunken WW II Ship Oil Leak Plugged

Atlantic Coast Marine Group, Inc. successfully responds to World War II era motor tanker leaking massive cargo of oil into the Atlantic Ocean's waters. Beaufort,

New ICTF Boosts Crowley’s Efficiency

The opening of Florida East Coast Railway’s (FEC) new, state-of-the-art intermodal container transfer facility (ICTF) adjacent to Crowley Maritime Corporation’s Port Everglades, Fla.

Technology

Fugro Launches Seastar XP2

Fugro Satellite Positioning released its Seastar XP2 PPP GNSS augmentation service on July 1, 2014, which provides increased redundancy for mission-critical offshore

Harnessing the Wind for Auxiliary Propulsion

Finnish marine engineering company Norsepower Oy Ltd. announced that it will bring to the commercial maritime market an auxiliary wind propulsion solution aimed

Engine Performs in Roll Over Test

Engines customized for new Dutch search-and-rescue lifeboat vessels keep running after full rotation on axis. In thrashing, unforgiving seas, a capsized rescue vessel used to be a symbol of defeat.

New Products

Fugro Launches Seastar XP2

Fugro Satellite Positioning released its Seastar XP2 PPP GNSS augmentation service on July 1, 2014, which provides increased redundancy for mission-critical offshore

MAN Extends High Speed Power Range

MAN announced it will present a newly developed 12-cylinder V-engine for use in working vessels at the SMM 2014 trade fair in Hamburg, Germany. The German engine

Volvo Penta Offer D4, D6 Series Engine Keel Cooling Option

Volvo Penta of the Americas has announced the availability of a keel cooling option with D4 and D6 marine diesel engines to meet customer demands in the North American marine commercial market.

Shipbuilding

Kleven Shipbuilding Wins IES Pioneer Contract

Norway’s Kleven announced it has signed a shipbuilding contract with Malaysian based joint venture company IES Pioneer Ltd. The vessel is of Norwegian design

Eastern to Build Offshore Vessel for Harvey Gulf

Eastern Shipbuilding announced that on, Wednesday July 16, 2014, Harvey Gulf International Marine, Inc. (HGIM) and Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. (ESG) entered

FORAN Users Meeting (FORUM 2014)

The Eighth FORAN Users Meeting (FORUM 2014) took place June 11-13, 2014 in the Parador de la Granja, Segovia, and when it was over the organizers proclaimed it a great success,

Environmental

Sunken WW II Ship Oil Leak Plugged

Atlantic Coast Marine Group, Inc. successfully responds to World War II era motor tanker leaking massive cargo of oil into the Atlantic Ocean's waters. Beaufort,

Maine Port City Bans Oil Loading

City councilors in South Portland, Maine, voted late Monday night to ban the loading of crude oil onto tankers along its waterfront, throwing up yet another roadblock

Pier Damaged at Port Canaveral

Undergoing Repairs While Coast Guard Investigates   The U.S. Coast Guard is investigating a weekend incident that caused pier damage and scattered concrete debris in the harbor on Sunday.

Fuels & Lubes

Suicide Attack Escalates Libya Violence, Oil Output Slips

Crude output slips for first time since port deal; fresh clashes in Tripoli and Benghazi. Brega oil port seen open in few days. A twin suicide bombing at a Libyan

Klüber Obtains Certification for Manufacturing Facilities

Klϋber Lubrication has received the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) ISO 21469 certification at its Londonderry, New Hampshire facility. The certification from

OSRO: The Child of Necessity

Most people in the maritime industry in the United States are familiar with the concept of the Oil Spill Removal Organization (OSRO).  It is one of the many quiet

Marine Power

Harnessing the Wind for Auxiliary Propulsion

Finnish marine engineering company Norsepower Oy Ltd. announced that it will bring to the commercial maritime market an auxiliary wind propulsion solution aimed

MAN Extends High Speed Power Range

MAN announced it will present a newly developed 12-cylinder V-engine for use in working vessels at the SMM 2014 trade fair in Hamburg, Germany. The German engine

Engine Performs in Roll Over Test

Engines customized for new Dutch search-and-rescue lifeboat vessels keep running after full rotation on axis. In thrashing, unforgiving seas, a capsized rescue vessel used to be a symbol of defeat.

 
 
Maritime Security Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.3185 sec (3 req/sec)