Fuel Cell Technology Gives Hope For Clean Ship Energy

Press Release
Wednesday, September 05, 2012

A new position paper from DNV Research and Innovation, gives hope for a future of reduced emissions from shipping.

With rising fuel prices and impending environmental regulations, the pressure is on for more efficient and environmentally friendly ships. DNV Research and Innovation has taken a leading role in facilitating the demonstration of safe and reliable fuel cell applications for ships. In the joint industry project, FellowSHIP, a 330 kW fuel cell was successfully installed, and demonstrated smooth operation for more than 7000 hours on board the offshore supply vessel Viking Lady.

Fuel cell technology of this magnitude has never before been installed in a merchant vessel, and the project is innovative on a global scale. The achievements of the project include significantly reduced CO2 emissions, improved energy efficiency and zero emissions of harmful substances compared to conventional engine technology.

This recent success with fuel cell technology indicates that it is possible to lower the contribution from shipping to global warming. Introducing fuel cells to ships benefit human health and the environment by avoiding local consequences of air pollution. It can even completely eliminate CO2 emission if hydrogen from renewables becomes available.

According to DNVs expert on the field, Researcher Eirik Ovrum, fuel cells can have a viable future within shipping. “DNV has paved the way for safe and smooth introduction of fuel cells for ships. We recognize that it will take time before fuel cells can become a realistic on-board alternative, mostly restricted by costs, but the FellowSHIP project has taken some important first steps towards a future for fuel cells on ships.”




 

Maritime Reporter June 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Technology

The Hour of Power: Hybrid Marine Technology and Green Ports

In 2015 two significant developments are going to make many operators, owners and builders of professional vessels consider hybrid marine power. Firstly the new emissions laws in ports,

GTT Records Order for 2 LNG Tankers

GTT receives a new order from Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries for two LNGCs for Teekay   GTT, a designer of membrane containment systems for the maritime transportation

SUNY Maritime to Host e-Navigation Conference

The e-Navigation Underway 2015 – North America conference will be hosted by The State University of New York (SUNY) Maritime College from September 28 to 30 on the college’s Throggs Neck, N.

Marine Power

Yanmar Diesel Engines for Fast New Crew Tender

The expansion of the number of wind turbines out at sea near the northern Dutch coast was reason enough for Ubels Offshore to expand its fleet with a fifth ship last year.

Hapag-Lloyd's New Noses Lower Emissions

Hamburg based shipping company Hapag-Lloyd plans for 24 of the largest containerships in its fleet to get new bulbous bows by 2016, with some of the vessels also

The Hour of Power: Hybrid Marine Technology and Green Ports

In 2015 two significant developments are going to make many operators, owners and builders of professional vessels consider hybrid marine power. Firstly the new emissions laws in ports,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Repair Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2483 sec (4 req/sec)