Training Will Help Women Thrive in Maritime Sector

Posted by Eric Haun
Tuesday, April 01, 2014
Claudia Grant, Deputy Director General of the Maritime Authority of Jamaica

Women have a significant role to play in the development of the maritime sector in the Caribbean, region but in order to survive and thrive they need access to professional training and education systems backed by internationally recognized and enforced employment standards.

This was the message two leading Caribbean shipping industry executives delivered to the “Maritime Women: Global Leadership 2nd International Conference” held by the World Maritime University (WMU) in Malmo, Sweden this week, March 31-April 1.

Claudia Grant, Deputy Director General of the Maritime Authority of Jamaica, and Vivette Grant, Deputy Executive Director of the Caribbean Maritime Institute, outlined the findings of a survey which examined the existence of gender bias in the maritime sector and its effects on women’s employment, promotion, career mobility and pay inequality.

More than 50% of the women taking part in the survey, which was conducted among women who have risen to senior leadership positions in various sectors of the Caribbean maritime industry, indicated they had experienced gender bias in their career, with many saying it had affected their pay levels or career mobility.

The two Jamaican speakers told delegates that the Caribbean countries’ governments have recognized the importance of the empowerment of women as being an essential tool in reducing poverty levels in the region. Access to education and training are key to this empowerment and the study highlighted the benefits of the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Women in Development (WID) program which has provided Caribbean women with access to the skills necessary to equip them to enter the specialized and male-dominated maritime industry.

They advised the conference that 89% of beneficiaries of the IMO WID program are now employed in senior management positions within the maritime sector but warned: “the job is not yet complete”.

They called for ongoing training and education opportunities to enable professional women to improve their qualifications, update their industry knowledge and “survive in this sector”. They also recommended establishment of an international code and minimum standards for the employment and empowerment of women in the maritime sector, backed by “appropriate control actions to ensure compliance”. In addition they championed the instigation of a professional association for maritime women to enable greater information sharing, networking, support and mentoring.

Claudia Grant said, “Women have an important contribution to make to the global economy and within the international maritime sector and we must ensure that we create the right global framework to ensure we are able to recruit, train and retain excellent female employees in the global shipping industry.”

The WMU conference considered how gender differences and unfair practices in professional maritime employment can be addressed by all the stakeholders, at international and national level, working to promote employment opportunities and to strengthen women’s roles once they are recruited. The conference also showcased the global achievements of the women alumni of WMU across the entire spectrum of maritime activity. Both C Grant and V Grant are graduates of WMU.
 

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter June 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

Construction of new Stockholm Norvik Port Begins

For Hutchison Port Holdings (HPH), one of the world’s leading container terminal operators, Stockholm is strategically important. In April the final permit was

The Odd Trio: HMM, Maersk and MSC

In one of the more bizarre twists in the container shipping market it emerged last week that financially troubled carrier South Korean Hyundai Merchant Marine

Norwegian Unions Say 755 O&G Workers Could Strike

About 755 Norwegian workers on seven oil and gas fields could go on strike from Saturday, hitting output from western Europe's top producer, if a new wage deal is not agreed before a Friday deadline,

Education/Training

Charting the Shift of Oceanic Boundary Currents

Global warming results in fundamental changes to important ocean currents. As scientists from the Alfred-Wegener-Institute show in a new study, wind-driven subtropical

Danelec Launches ECDIS Computer-based Training

Danelec Launches ECDIS Computer-based Training   Danelec Marine has launched a new computer-based training (CBT) program for its second-generation DM800 ECDIS G2 products.

Antwerp Port Extends Partnership with DMU of China

The port of Antwerp is to collaborate with Dalian Maritime University (DMU) in northern China for the next three academic years. DMU is a prestigious Chinese maritime

News

Evinrude Expands E-Tec G2 Horsepower

BRP (TSX:DOO)announced today the release of the next generation of Evinrude E-TEC G2 models with horsepower ranging from 150 to 200, the E-TEC G2 150, 150 H.O., 175 and 200.

Construction of new Stockholm Norvik Port Begins

For Hutchison Port Holdings (HPH), one of the world’s leading container terminal operators, Stockholm is strategically important. In April the final permit was

Wärtsilä, Zamakona Yards Join forces in Canary Island

Wärtsilä is enhancing its service offering by participating in a new maintenance hub in the Canary Islands. The facility, operated by one of Spain's biggest shipbuilding and ship repair groups,

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Offshore Oil Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1260 sec (8 req/sec)