Unmanned Ships Now a Reality

Posted by Peter Pospiech
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Drones do it and spacecraft have too, for many years. Recently, also, automobile makers and small boat makers have introduced their first autonomous vehicles on the streets, and waterways.
Unmanned vessels on the ocean is no longer a dream – it is a reality. And according to those in the know, the reality will really start to come to fruition in the coming decaded.
The MUNIN project (Maritime Unmanned Navigation through Intelligence in Networks) is investigating potential concepts for a fully or partially unmanned merchant vessel. The case ship is a dry bulk carrier of handymax size, operating on routes between Europe and South America in the beginning. The project is being partly funded by the EU in pursuit of one of the project outcomes of the European Waterborne Strategic Research Agenda: The autonomous ship.
Partners of the MUNIN project are: the Fraunhofer CML, MARINTEK, Chalmers University, Hochschule Wismar, Aptomar, MarineSoft, MARORKA, University College Cork. The available budget is of $5.13m in total whereby $3.9m is funded by the EU. The MUNIN project was started on September 1, 2012, and will be finished in three year time.
Partly or fully unmanned ships will offer many possible benefits, but one of the main driving forces for the project has been the problem of recruiting sufficient qualified crew-members. This is already a significant problem in Europe, and it will increase as “slow steaming” becomes more widespread. Lower speeds and longer voyage durations will increase the overall demand for crew while reducing the attractiveness of the job: staying at sea for three weeks or more and communicating with friends and family via cost intensive telecommunication systems.
The idea of a ship sailing without a lookout and helmsman is worrying and even frightening to many people. One important part of the project, therefore, is to show that unmanned ships can be at least as safe as conventional vessels, and may even be safer. Professionals agree that “human error” is the cause of between 65 and 90% of shipping accidents. While the definition of human error and the role played in it by technology can be discussed, there is arguably great potential for improving safety by relieving the crew of the most tedious tasks, such as keeping a lookout over open sea for three weeks at a stretch. The MUNIN project will employ the KISS principle: Keep it Simple Stupid! It is important that the technology employed is well-tried and trustworthy. It is also important to use the appropriate technology for the problems at hands.

Posted by Peter Pospiech @ www.maritimepropulsion.com

 

(As published in the February 2014 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News - www.marinelink.com)

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter June 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Marine Power

India: Big Push on Coastal Shipping of Thermal Coal under Sagarmala

The State Government of Odisha will partner the Ministry of Shipping for taking ahead the ‘port-led development’ agenda under Sagarmala, the flagship program of the Ministry.

Solstad CSV Gets Propulsion Overhaul at Gibdock

Gibraltar’s Gibdock shipyard has completed its scope of work on Solstad Shipping’s Normand Cutter, a 127-meter-long, 10,979grt construction support vessel (CSV)

Rolls-Royce Azimuth Thrusters Ordered for New Tug

Rolls-Royce has won an order for US255 FP z-drives from San Francisco’s Vessel Chartering LLC, a wholly owned division of Baydelta Navigation. The thrusters will

News

Will Zim Join 2M?

Israeli carrier Zim Integrated Shipping Services (ZIM) might join the 2M Alliance between Maersk Line and Mediterranean Shipping Co., Alphaline said quoting industry sources.

OOCL Tops the Chart in Reliability

According to the latest Carrier Performance Insight, produced by Drewry Supply Chain Advisors,  the most reliable carrier in May was Orient Overseas Container Line (OOCL),

Senate Confirms Three to Serve on Federal Maritime Commission

The U.S. Senate has confirmed the nominations of three individuals to serve as Federal Maritime Commissioners: Rebecca F. Dye, Michael A. Khouri and Daniel B. Maffei.

Marine Equipment

Norsafe Secures Contract with VARD Group

Norsafe informs it has signed a new contract with VARD Group, and will supply lifeboats complete with davit systems to a series of 15 new vessels.    Topaz Energy

Solstad CSV Gets Propulsion Overhaul at Gibdock

Gibraltar’s Gibdock shipyard has completed its scope of work on Solstad Shipping’s Normand Cutter, a 127-meter-long, 10,979grt construction support vessel (CSV)

Rolls-Royce Azimuth Thrusters Ordered for New Tug

Rolls-Royce has won an order for US255 FP z-drives from San Francisco’s Vessel Chartering LLC, a wholly owned division of Baydelta Navigation. The thrusters will

Maritime Safety

Maritime Piracy: More "sophisticated and prevalent” around Gulf of Guinea

While the matter of maritime piracy has seemingly subdued from its high profile peaks of a few years ago, Stuart Edmonston, Head of Loss Prevention at UK P&I Club,

UASC Fully Compliant VGM Lift Now

United Arab Shipping Company (UASC) announced today the conclusion of a 100% compliant Verified Gross Mass (VGM) lift of 159 UASC containers on board CSCL’s Saturn.

Netherlands Opts for ‘Flexible’ Container Weighing

As of July 1, shippers and freight forwarders are required to verify the weight of a container before the container is loaded onto a ship.   The Netherlands’

Vessels

Will Zim Join 2M?

Israeli carrier Zim Integrated Shipping Services (ZIM) might join the 2M Alliance between Maersk Line and Mediterranean Shipping Co., Alphaline said quoting industry sources.

Fincantieri Delivers Seven Seas Explorer

The first of two ultra luxury cruise ships delivered for Regent Seven Seas Cruises   Seven Seas Explorer, the newest ultra luxury ship of Regent Seven Seas Cruises,

Solstad CSV Gets Propulsion Overhaul at Gibdock

Gibraltar’s Gibdock shipyard has completed its scope of work on Solstad Shipping’s Normand Cutter, a 127-meter-long, 10,979grt construction support vessel (CSV)

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1548 sec (6 req/sec)