Report Makes Light Work of Heavy Weather

By Michelle Howard
Tuesday, July 08, 2014
Photo courtesy of The Swedish Club

Modern weather routing techniques have made facing heavy weather considerably less hazardous for the modern mariner than for his forbears. However such techniques are not a panacea and a new report from The Swedish Club published today, Heavy Weather, offers guidance on how to avoid the many problems associated with heavy weather conditions.


The Club explains how, with the correct preparation and procedures, a vessel can minimize the effects of sailing through heavy weather. The advice is backed up by case studies which clearly demonstrate that the best prevention against heavy weather casualties is to plan the route properly and to reduce speed and alter course as required.

Statistics show that that Heavy Lift, Container and RoRo vessels are at the highest risk of suffering hull damage when sailing through adverse weather conditions, with the majority of all H&M heavy weather claims occurring in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.  On the other hand, most cargo claims occur on Container vessels. RoRo vessels are of particular interest as heavy weather claims cover both damage to cargo, but also hull damage associated with incorrectly secured cargo.

Lars Malm, Director, Strategic Business Development & Client Relationship, who commissioned the report said, “This is a problem that affects not only the P&I side of our business but also our H&M claims handling. Typical claims include damage to/ loss of cargo, structural damage to a vessel, or damage to machinery and equipment. These can result from poorly secured cargo hatches, improperly secured heavy cargo, and the phenomenon of parametric rolling - an instability inherent in some new hull forms.”

Yet as Malm explained, “Warnings about the development of a hurricane or other serious weather phenomenon are usually available many days before the weather arrives. The key is how this information is being used and what preventive measures are being taken. We see examples of the crew not managing to avoid the heavy weather, not slowing down or altering course to avoid large waves pounding the vessel.”

And ports do not always offer a place of safety. “Ironically we have also dealt with cases of the damage that can be caused if the vessel stays in port when heavy weather is approaching,” he adds.  “There can be damage not only to the vessel itself but also to other vessels and facilities, in addition to an increasing risk of running aground.”

The Swedish Club offers useful checklists within Heavy Weather which cover the importance of adhering to the cargo-securing manual, guidance on course and speed, and managing ballast conditions in the vessel. However, as Malm added, “The best preventive measure any vessel can take against heavy weather damage is to slow down and to alter to a more favorable course.”

Heavy Weather  is  the latest in The Swedish Club’s series of Loss Prevention publications.
 

  • Photo courtesy of The Swedish Club

    Photo courtesy of The Swedish Club

Maritime Reporter September 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Ports

Long Beach Cargo Continues to Climb

Cargo container traffic rose 7.3 percent in September at the Port of Long Beach compared to the same month last year, making for the Southern California seaport’s busiest September since 2007,

New Intermodal Rail Service from PortMiami

Florida East Coast Railway (FECR) and PortMiami, through a strategic alliance, are offering the Sunshine Gateway service, which includes on-dock intermodal rail capabilities.

Singapore’s MPA Discuss LNG Bunkering

The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA), Antwerp Port Authority, Port of Rotterdam and Port of Zeebrugge participated in a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)

Environmental

Sunken Barge Salvage Stops Traffic on Chicago River

The U.S. Coast Guard said it is restricting vessel traffic on the Chicago River to allow for salvage of a sunken barge. All cargo has been removed from the sunken

Maritime Reporter @ 75: The Daily Cartoon

Maritime Reporter & Engineering News was founded by John J. O'Malley (1905-1980) in 1939, and today ranks as the world's largest audited trade publication in the world serving the maritime industry,

Renewable Energy: Schottel Tidal Turbines Ready For Use

In the last months Schottel  successfully tested its hydrokinetic turbines in Strangford Lough, Northern Ireland. The full-scale tests included 260 operating hours under realistic conditions.

News

Coast Guard Foundation to Honor USCG in Miami

The Coast Guard Foundation, a nonprofit organization committed to the education and welfare of all Coast Guard members and their families, announced today that

Sunken Barge Salvage Stops Traffic on Chicago River

The U.S. Coast Guard said it is restricting vessel traffic on the Chicago River to allow for salvage of a sunken barge. All cargo has been removed from the sunken

Weak Oil Threatens US Export of LNG

Plunging global oil prices may turn hopes for cheap liquefied natural gas supplies from the United States into a costly disappointment for Asian buyers who have

Marine Equipment

B COOL Acquires MEMAC

With the acquisition of MEMAC, B COOL A/S now offers customers one entry to multiple maritime systems – both refrigeration solutions and monitoring of the engine

TRIYARDS Buys into Aluminium Shipbuilding Expertise

TRIYARDS Holdings Limited, an offshore vessel fabrication and engineering solutions provider to the oil and gas (O&G) industry, has added new capabilities, products

Singapore’s MPA Discuss LNG Bunkering

The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA), Antwerp Port Authority, Port of Rotterdam and Port of Zeebrugge participated in a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)

Maritime Safety

Sunken Barge Salvage Stops Traffic on Chicago River

The U.S. Coast Guard said it is restricting vessel traffic on the Chicago River to allow for salvage of a sunken barge. All cargo has been removed from the sunken

USCG Reopens Port Allen Post Hurricane Ana

The Coast Guard Captain of the Port reopened Port Allen in Kauai Monday morning after surveying crews deemed it  safe for transit. The maritime public is advised

Mitsubishi Super Skiving System

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has completed development of the "Mitsubishi Super Skiving System" for machining internal gears with high speed and outstanding precision.

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Port Authority Salvage Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1614 sec (6 req/sec)