Marine Link
Thursday, November 23, 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News magazine

September 2016 issue

Feature: Maritime & Ship Security

Technical: Maritime Propulsion: The Hybrid Drive Solution

Product: Clean Water Technologies

Content

  • Silence Your Ships

    Anthropogenic (manmade) sound is creating havoc among marine mammals and other aquatic species. These creatures have very sensitive hearing, which they rely on to find food and mates and (for some) to communicate and navigate. Sound waves can travel much further and with much less loss of strength in water than in air. In pre-industrial times, the oceans were relatively quiet. Sailing ships generated almost no subsurface noise.

  • Measuring Noise Levels of Cavitating Propellers

    As underwater radiated noise levels in the oceans increases, MARIN has investigated just how much cavitating propellers are to blame. Traditionally, underwater radiated noise is mainly of interest for naval vessels and fishery research ships. Nowadays, however, there is a growing concern that marine life is affected by the rise in background noise levels in the oceans. Marine mammals and fish use sound to communicate and to sense their environment and this requires low background noise levels.

  • What the Heck is ‘Privity’?

    Is the Limitation of Liability Act Still Relevant? In the aftermath of the El Faro disaster, that vessel’s owners exercised their right to file a petition to limit their liability in accordance with the U.S. Shipowner’s Limitation of Liability Act, 46 USC §30501, et seq. This evoked negative press and social media reaction with a now-familiar refrain: Why should a shipowner escape full liability for a disaster by hiding behind a 19th-century (i.e., outdated, antique, ancient) statute?

  • Fuels of the Future

    The imposition of a global 0.5% sulfur cap may be less than four years away. This clearly will eliminate residual fuel from the available fuel options unless you have fitted your vessel with a scrubber or other exhaust gas treatment technology in order to comply with MARPOL Annex VI emission regulations. At the start of 2015, permitted sulfur levels in emission control areas (ECA) dropped from 1% m/m to 0.10% m/m.

  • Grand Bahama Shipyard: Investing in the Future

    MR spent time with Graham Couser, VP of Sales and Marketing, Grand Bahama Shipyard Ltd. (GBSL), for updates and insights on how this yard is faring in the current market and investing for the future. As the largest ship repair yard in the Caribbean, Grand Bahama Shipyard Limited, Couser said the yard is committed to continual investment based on customer’s needs, in markets good and bad. “The cruise market remains buoyant and upbeat with growth planned into the next few years,” said Couser.

  • Vessel Spotlight: RV Meen Shandhani

    IMC’s latest fisheries research and survey vessel design was built in Malaysia for the Bangladesh Department of Fisheries. RV Meen Shandhani arrived in Bangladesh in June after completing extensive sea and fishing trials and its delivery voyage. The Australian consultancy’s naval architects and engineers drew on a wealth of relevant experience, data and expertise when developing the research vessel’s design.

  • Choke Points are Flash Points

    The world is closely watching several contentious flash points that have potential to ignite. The behavior and rhetoric of China and Russia regarding vital shipping lanes in international waters have been alarming. Disputed sovereignty claims and efforts to enforce them have the maritime world on edge. China’s nine-dash line claims about owning the entire East and South China Sea have created a dilemma for themselves and the other nations in the region. The Philippines v.

  • NYK Steams Ahead

    Tokyo-based Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK) Group is not only one of the world’s largest ship owners with a diverse fleet of more than 800 ships, it is a growing global maritime logistics powerhouse. Maritime Reporter & Engineering News visited with Yasuo Tanaka, Senior Managing Corporate Officer, Naval Architect, in Tokyo for his insights on the company’s continued efforts to invest in operational efficiency.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Nov 2017 - The Workboat Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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