Marine Link
Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News magazine

March 2017 issue

Feature: The Green Marine Technology Edition

Technical: Energy Efficient Drives

Product: Marine Coatings & Corrosion Control

Content

  • Cabotage Rules Changes Proposed

    On January 18, 2017, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) proposed in its Customs Bulletin & Decisions newsletter a significant change to the U.S. cabotage rules. For many years, use of non-coastwise-qualified vessels in the transportation of pipeline repair material; anodes; pipeline connectors; wellhead equipment, valves and valve guards; damaged pipeline; platform repair material; and similar items from a U.S. point to another point within U.S.

  • Chantier Davie Shipyard: Competitive Value of Integrated Shipbuilding Tech

    Case study: Chantier Davie Shipyard invests in AVEVA technology to keep competitive. Established in 1825, Chantier Davie Shipyard is Canada’s oldest, and still today one of its most innovative, shipyards. Situated in Quebec, the yard has been expanding in both working and production capacity, and its 1,300 workers now have the capability to handle 1,200 t / month of steel production at its 570,000 square meter facilities.

  • Naval Design: The Human Role

    Many navy new building projects face a double challenge; the variety and complexity of operations are increasing, while at the same time, a reduction in manning is a prerequisite in order to lower building and operational costs. Therefore, it is important to identify the required number and type of crew and the supporting systems in the concept phase.

  • Trump's Navy: A Look at the Future US Navy

    It’s still too early to know for certain what the new administration will do about building up the U.S. Navy, as the numbers are a moving target. But with President Trump’s recent pledge to add $54 billion to defense spending, it’s a safe bet to make that the fleet will grow. So let’s start with the numbers. There are different ways to count the fleet size, including whether or not you count auxiliaries, but let’s use this number as the baseline: There are 274 ships in the U.S. Navy now.

  • Singapore’s Survivability

    Singapore’s shipyards are looking to recent investments in capacity, design and newly acquired technology to combat order declines after a decades-long offshore buildup. Sembcorp and peer Keppel are making the most of partnerships in FLNG and showing signs they’ll be okay through the downturn, helped by their gas-hungry Australasian backyard and renewed ties with old charterer parties and suppliers.

  • Transportation Electrification Arrives at the Waterfront

    Transportation electrification (TE) is starting to impact California like no other state, maybe unlike any other place in the world. Essentially, and eventually, TE depends on replacing gasoline and diesel engines with renewably generated electric power. This could include just about every car, truck, fork lift, drayage vehicle, train and ship in California. For the freight industry, including the maritime sector, TE presents complex challenges.

  • New Fuel Regs Drive Scrubber Business

    The Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems Association and its members are preparing to meet higher demand for gas scrubbing systems to bring SOx emissions in line with the targets set by the IMO’s 2020 fuel sulfur content proposals.

  • Case Study: 18-day Exhaust Gas Scrubber Install

    Goltens was contracted by a large cruise vessel owner to undertake the installation of two exhaust gas scrubbers on one of its ships to comply with sulfur emissions regulations. The vessel is powered by four GMT/Sulzer 16ZAV40S and two GMT/Sulzer 12ZAV40S diesel electric generating sets.

  • Clean Shipping on the Great Lakes

    Maritime Reporter & Engineering News recently spoke with Mark Barker, president of The Interlake Steamship Company, who has sent its fourth vessel — its second 1,000-footer — to be outfitted with exhaust gas scrubbers. After seriously pursuing the possibility of converting its ships to run on liquefied natural gas (LNG) several years ago, U.S. based Great Lakes shipper The Interlake Steamship Company found that the region’s LNG infrastructure was simply not present to support such conversions.

  • Fast Small Ship Simulator

    Bouncing over the waves at a speed of 43 knots, the director of the Defense Materiel Organization (DMO) Vice Admiral Arie Jan de Waard, and MARIN’s director Bas Buchner, made the first test voyage on the moving ‘Fast Small Ship Simulator.’ This FSSS is built by MARIN and SME partners, Cruden and TreeC, as part of a CODEMO project to stimulate the development of a prototype.

  • Simulation: Delgado Maritime & Industrial Training Center

    Delgado’s Simulator Suite is comprised of three interactive Full Mission Bridge simulators. Simulators are used for Wheelhouse Proficiency Management classes to provide scenarios on navigating waterways on different types of vessels. Simulators can be programmed to run three vessels at the same time, so that students in all three wheel houses can communicate and interact with each other. Both conventional and Z-Drive controls can be used in the training.

  • Simulation: The Centre for Marine Simulation

    St. CMS operates a range of marine simulation equipment that covers a broad range of marine and offshore activities. Much of the equipment is highly specialized and unique including fully motion capable simulators. The center also provides technical management and support of simulation equipment that is used by other parts of the Marine Institute. CMS simulation activities can be divided into three main areas; Training, Industrial Response, and Applied Research.

  • Simulation: Maritime Professional Training

    In South Florida sits MPT, one of the most prolific and progressive maritime training facilities. Already fully stocked, MPT added significant weight to its offering in 2016 with investment in 25,000 sq. ft. of new training space and technology. MPT handles more than 12,000 students a year from all segments of the maritime industry and from more than a dozen countries.

  • Simulation: CSMART

    While much of the maritime world slumps, the cruise sector is enjoying its most vibrant growth in a generation. Carnival Corporation, in particular, is doing very well as its financial performance is stronger than ever, with 2016 delivering the best year of earnings in company history. The company’s adjusted earnings for 2016 of $2.6 billion is the best annual financial performance in its 44-year history.

  • The (Really) Big Lift

    Cranes: much more than just critical equipment. At ZPMC, it means the supply chain itself. In post-Panamax world – that is to say one which includes an expanded, deepened and improved Panama Canal – there are many layers to the logistics onion. These include reinforced and improved berths and bollards, deepened blue water harbors, improved intermodal connections ashore and a reshuffling of ever larger tonnage for ports that can handle those ships.

  • Op/Ed: Shiphandlers Beware

    Was the closing of the Houston Ship Channel for over three days in March 2015 due to the use of Ultra Low Sulphur Fuel Oil (ULSFO)? After reviewing the testimony, and evidentiary material presented by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) regarding the 2015 Conti Peridot’s collision with the Carla Maersk, it is the authors' opinion the report fails to address significant contributing factors. The NTSB has overlooked a serious threat to vessel operations throughout the world.

  • Interview: Crystal CEO Edie Rodriguez

    Edie Rodriguez is Chairman, CEO and president of Crystal Luxury Corporation, Ltd., a broad travel brand that includes Crystal Cruises, Crystal Yacht Expedition Cruises, Crystal River Cruises, Crystal Luxury Air, Crystal AirCruises and Crystal Exclusive Class ships with Crystal Residences. She met with Maritime Reporter in NYC to discuss the evolution of the cruising brand, as well as the benefits of owning your own shipyards in today’s torrid cruise market.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Nov 2017 - The Workboat Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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