Marine Link
Friday, October 20, 2017

CORAL REEF

Resolve Fixes Damaged Coral Reefs

before

International salvage company, Resolve, is helping to repair damage done by the maritime industry through a pioneering coral reef replacement system. From its U.S. base in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Resolve has developed a technique to effectively grow coral and anchor it to the seabed atop custom‐made underwater structures. Resolve has completed the environmental remediation of the 910 ft long decommissioned Navy aircraft carrier ex‐Oriskany. Resolve was awarded the project by the US Navy and successfully prepared and sank the vessel for reefing purposes off the coast of Pensacola, FL – creating the worldʹs largest artificial reef. Coral reef damage is a big concern for the shipping industry. Recently, the insurer of a Panama‐flagged tanker which struck a reef in the Caribbean agreed to pay the high cost of replacing the damaged coral. This was one of seven such incidents in the past month. Resolve’s system involves fragmenting healthy corals, nurturing them in a lab, attaching them to larger eco‐friendly reef structures, and then transplanting them back into their previous environment. These structures provide a raised, porous, yet sturdy substrate to promote rapid growth, environmental complexity, and an animal friendly habitat. Resolve’s Marine BioTechnicians measure the growing coral regularly to gain an approximation of the growth levels

Tubbataha Reef Wreck Removal Completed

Guardian Final Lift: Photo credit USN

The stern section, the last module of the former minehunter 'USS Guardian' has now been removed by salvors. In January 2013 the Navy mine countermeasures ship USS Guardian ran aground on a coral reef in the Philippines, inside Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park. The Navy removed the approximately 15,000 gallons of fuel aboard the ship and decided that the safest way to extract the Guardian from the reef was to deconstruct and carry it away in smaller sections.

Keys Coral Reefs First In U.S. To Receive International Protection

Deputy Secretary of Commerce Sam Bodman joined with shipping industry representatives today to announce that the department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has taken historic steps through the International Maritime Organization to create the first U.S. zone to protect coral from anchors, groundings and collisions from large international ships. The zone, known as the Florida Keys' Particularly Sensitive Sea Area, is more than 3,000

Lockheed Martin System To Monitor Gulf of Suez Safety

Lockheed Martin has completed the final Site Acceptance Test (SAT) for the Gulf of Suez Vessel Traffic Information Management System (VTIMS), which will monitor and control ship traffic in all major port and harbor waters. The $50 million maritime safety system is the foundation of the Arab Republic of Egypt's total port management program. Work boats and fishing vessels traverse the 175-nautical-mile-long Gulf along with huge oil tankers and boats full of tourists visiting the famous Red

Coastal Land Preserved, Anniversary of Oil Spill

NOAA Photo

On the 15th anniversary of a million gallon oil spill that damaged the coastline of Puerto Rico, NOAA and partner organizations are celebrating the purchase of 152 acres to expand a coastal reserve near one of the areas hardest hit by the spill. NOAA, the commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the Trust for Public Land announced that 152 acres east of San Juan have been added to the San Miguel Natural Reserve to help compensate the public for lost recreational beach use and injured natural

TITAN, CSA to Partner on Environmentally Sensitive Jobs

TITAN Salvage and CSA International, Inc. announced that they have signed a memorandum of understanding that allows TITAN to gain the experience and expertise of CSA's coral reef and seagrass experts when TITAN undertakes environmentally sensitive jobs anywhere in the world. CSA, a leader in marine environmental sciences and related services, will help ensure that potential impacts of wreck removal and salvage operations to reef or seagrass habitats are mitigated and minimized to the

Marine Debris Removed from Remote Hawaiian Islands

Members of the U.S. Coast Guard, NOAA, and the University of Hawaii's Sea Grant Program have just returned from a joint mission to remove thousands of pounds of deadly marine debris from the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. The Coast Guard Cutter Walnut, a 225-ft. buoy tender home ported in Honolulu, departed on Aug. 22 for a 1,000 mile trip to the remote islands of Pearl and Hermes Atoll. Their goal was to remove as much lethal marine debris as possible

Naval Vessel Damaged in Palau

The Navy on March 22 dispatched a Lafayette-class frigate and two tugboats to escort s warship back to Kaohsiung, after it was damaged in Palau when carrying out a naval friendship tour. According to Taipei Times, no one was hurt in the accident. Another Cheng Kung-class frigate was also ordered to go to sea to replace the damaged warship and continue the mission. The damaged ship was currently around 93km from Palau, escorted by Palauan vessels

Boats: Hawaiian Catamaran: Environmental Awareness In Comfort

Hawaiian maritime tradition traces its roots to the huge ocean going outrigger canoes that took sophisticated navigators island hopping around the expanse of the Pacific Ocean. Today fiberglass versions of these canoes are put through their paces by canoe racing clubs. Other reincarnations of the outrigger's twin hulls are the many catamarans, both sail and power, that take thousands of tourists out into the island waters every day of the year

Hawaiian CAT: Enviro Awareness In Comfort

Hawaiian maritime tradition traces its roots to the huge ocean going outrigger canoes that took sophisticated navigators island hopping around the expanse of the Pacific Ocean. Today fiberglass versions of these canoes are put through their paces by canoe racing clubs. Other reincarnations of the outrigger’s twin hulls are the many catamarans, both sail and power, that take thousands of tourists out into the island waters every day of the year.

Coral Reefs: A Unique Natural Resource

© vlad61_61 / Adobe Stock

Stony corals are marine invertebrates with somewhat unique life cycles. For the most part, they reproduce sexually, broadcasting gametes into the water. Often, an entire coral colony or reef will spawn on the same night. Coral may also reproduce asexually by producing genetically identical polyps. Fertilized gametes drift in the current until, hopefully, they alight on a hard surface like a rock suitable for attachment

Philippines Completes Scientific Survey in Disputed Sea

The Philippines has completed an 18-day scientific survey in the South China Sea to assess the condition of coral reefs and draw a nautical map of disputed area, a top security official said on Thursday.   Two survey ships, including an advanced research vessel acquired from the United States, conducted surveys around Scarborough Shoal and on three islands, including Thitu, in the Spratly group, National Security Adviser Hermogenes Esperon said.  

KOTUG Adds Fifth Infield Support Vessel

Coral Knight (Photo: KOTUG)

Towage operator KOTUG said it has acquired a fifth infield support vessels (ISVs) in Australia and East Timor, furthering its investment in offshore support.   The new vessel, Coral Knight, will be bare boat chartered exclusively to Australian Maritime Systems Limited (AMS) to provide emergency towage services and maintain aids to the navigation network at the Great Barrier Reef for AMSA (Australian Maritime Safety Authority).   

Saab's Maritime Solution Protecting Great Barrier Reef

Photo: Saab AB

 As one of the wonders of the natural world, many consider the Great Barrier Reef one of the Earth’s most beautiful places.    The marine environment in the area is extremely sensitive and with around 4000 commercial vessels passing every year, it is important for the vessel services operators working onshore to keep track of the traffic at all times. That’s where Saab comes in.   Comprising nearly 3000 individual reefs and almost 100 islands

US, Cuba Open Doors to Marine Science Cooperation

Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

 When Barack Obama became the first president to visit Cuba since Calvin Coolidge, his visit highlighted not only a new course in international relations, but showcased on-going scientific collaborations with the country only 90 miles off the Florida coast.   "Ocean currents know no boundaries,” said Billy Causey, regional director of NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries' Southeast Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region

Korea's Doorae Shipping Fined $750K for Illegal Discharge

Sunrise off of Oahu. (Photo: Greg Trauthwein)

United States District Court Judge Leslie E. Kobayashi accepted the guilty plea of Doorae Shipping Co., LTD, a South Korean maritime operations company, and sentenced the company to pay a fine of $750,000, a community service payment of $200,000, and a term of two years of probation for the failure to maintain an accurate oil record book, in violation of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, and making false statements to the U.S

Fighting Barnacle Buildup with Biology

File photo: Scott Hart

New research solves a mystery behind the gunk that sticks to the bottoms of ships.   The coating of barnacles and other growth along the bottoms of vessels is more than just an eyesore. Biofouling, as it is known, slows down ships and impedes the readiness of emergency response and military vessels.   “Biofouling is an economic issue,” said San Diego State University biologist Nick Shikuma.  

Global Climate Change Threatens Papahānaumokuākea Marine

Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA

 Despite its remote location in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument faces a looming threat of global climate change that will affect its land and marine ecosystems, as well as its cultural resources, according to a new NOAA report.   The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Conservation Series report, Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, finds that sea-level rise, ocean acidification

Australia settles six years after Barrier Reef accident

Australia on Monday reached a A$39.3 million ($29.66 million) out-of-court settlement with the owners of a Chinese coal carrier that ran aground in 2010 on the Great Barrier Reef. The settlement, dismissed by an environmental group as not enough, is less than a third of what the Australian government was seeking from the ship's owner - Shenzhen Energy Transport Co - for remediation costs after the 225-metre long Shen Neng 1 ran aground on the reef's Douglas Shoal.

Tropical Coral reefs lose their Zooplankton through Ocean Acidification

Control site Ambient. Photo source :Alfred Wegener Institute PR

Tropical coral reefs lose up to two thirds of their zooplankton through ocean acidification. This is the conclusion reached by a German-Australian research team that examined two reefs with so-called carbon dioxide seeps off the coast of Papua New Guinea. At these locations volcanic carbon dioxide escapes from the seabed, lowering the water’s acidity to a level, which scientists predict for the future of the oceans

South China Sea Arbitration: Implications for Maritime and O&G

(Credit: Blank Rome LLC)

A recent decision by an international tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, has significant implications for other maritime disputes, freedom of navigation, and future oil and gas claims in the Arctic.      The arbitral award issued on July 12, 2016, by a unanimous five-member panel or Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) in the dispute between the Philippines and China over rocks and elevations in the South China Sea

$45 mln to bolster Reef Protection

Josh Frydenberg, Minister for the Environment and Energy Photo Australian Government Media Release Service

The Australian and Queensland Governments are investing $45 million in an Australian first to improve water quality and reduce sediment run-off across the Great Barrier Reef. The $45 million Great Barrier Reef Gully and Streambank Joint Program will deliver a cohesive program of restoration work in key catchments including Burdekin, Fitzroy and Cape York. The joint program between government, the private sector, research institutions and conservations groups includes scientific

Obama Looks to Block Arctic, Atlantic Drilling

file image: an offshore production platfom (CREDIT: James Fisher)

U.S. President Barack Obama is preparing to block the sale of new offshore drilling rights in much of the U.S. Arctic and parts of the Atlantic, Bloomberg reported, citing two people familiar with the decision. Obama's move, which could come as soon as today, will give him the liberty to withdraw U.S. waters from future oil and gas leasing, Bloomberg said on Monday. (http://bloom.bg/2hNqTWu) It said Obama was expected to invoke a provision in a 1953 law that had been used sparingly until

$124 mi Reef Authority Funding Boost for Townsville

Angus Taylor Photo gov.au

Australia’s lead management agency for the Great Barrier Reef will receive a $124 million funding boost over the next 10 years from the Turnbull Government. The funding commitment for the Townsville-based Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority is great news for the North Queensland region and Townsville, and follows the signing of Australia’s first City Deal for Townsville earlier this month. Frydenberg said the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Video: Retired Ship Sunk to Form Artificial Reef

Photo: Matrix New World Engineering

Sinking a 6,000-ton, 371-foot former cargo vessel to help create an artificial reef in the Gulf of Mexico is a herculean feat, one only accomplished with strict adherence to rigorous federal and state environmental regulations.   When the cargo ship Kraken was recently sunk 67 miles off the Galveston coast, Matrix New World Engineering helped the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Artificial Reef Program ensure that the vessel was free of environmental hazards and safe to support

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2017 - The Marine Design Annual

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

Subscribe
Maritime Reporter E-News subscription

Maritime Reporter E-News is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for Maritime Reporter E-News