Marine Link
Monday, October 23, 2017

ICE FLOE

Programmed Multikopter Flies Autonomously Through Arctic

Alfred Wegener Institute programmed a Multikopter

  How do you get an aircraft in the far reaches of the Arctic Ocean to the goal, if the compass does not provide reliable location data? Engineers aboard the research icebreaker Polarstern of the Alfred Wegener Institute programmed a Multikopter so that he can navigate near the North Pole, despite declination of the Earth's magnetic field. A first successful test flight together with autonomous landing celebrated scientists recently on an ice floe. "The autonomous navigation is in high latitudes is a major challenge," says Sascha Lehmenhecker, engineer at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, the Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI). "Navigation is by means of magnetic sensors. However, the field lines of the Earth's magnetic field show in pole near almost perpendicular to the ground, so that a precise navigation is difficult. For this reason, commercial Multikopter controls for inserts are unsuitable in polar regions, "said the engineer. Together with the two graduate students Michael straw Meier and Tobias Mikschl of the University of Würzburg developed Lehmenhecker the control of so-called Multikopter on. This is driven by a number of propellers, about half a meter large aircraft to be sold in the future on ice and after several hours of there own to fly back to a research ship. The special task: Both the ice floe and the ship move

Drifting Arctic Tankship Gets Icebreakers Escort

Tanker Nordvik: Photo courtesy of Khatanga Sea Trade Port

The “Nordvik”, which had been drifting in remote Arctic waters following a collision with an ice floe, is now being accompanied by icebreakers to its home port, reports the 'Barents Observer'. Citing the Russian Sea and River Transport Agency, Barents Obsever says that a total of 1800 litres of diesel oil was transferred from the “Nordvik” into the tanker “Boris Vilkitsky”. The two vessels are now accompanied by two nuclear-powered icebreakers

Tanker Grounding Update

On behalf of the Unified Command, the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) issued a Situation Report stating that the tanker Seabulk Pride grounded in Cook Inlet near Nikiski. No pollution was reported initially. The tanker was apparently pushed aground by an ice floe. A Second Situation Report states that several tugs and a response barge are being mobilized. A small amount of oil was spilled when the tanker was pushed away from its mooring by the ice

Nichols Brothers Resumes Work

Nichols Brothers Boat Builders returned to work after the company laid off 185 employees Nov. 2. Shortly thereafter, the company filed for bankruptcy protection, a move necessitated by a big lawsuit filed by a disgruntled customer. While the bankruptcy issues are far from settled, Nichols Brothers was allowed to negotiate with individual boat owners to see that their projects, shut down on Nov. 2, could be completed.

This Day in Coast Guard History – Jan. 25

1799- Having existed essentially nameless for 8-1/2 years, Alexander Hamilton's "system of cutters" was referred to in legislation as "Revenue Cutters."  Some decades later, the name evolved to Revenue Cutter Service and Revenue Marine. 1940- The ocean station program was formally established on 25 January 1940 under orders from President Franklin Roosevelt.  The Coast Guard, in cooperation with the U. S

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – January 25

1799- Having existed essentially nameless for 8-1/2 years, Alexander Hamilton's "system of cutters" was referred to in legislation as "Revenue Cutters."  Some decades later, the name evolved to Revenue Cutter Service and Revenue Marine. 1940- The ocean station program was formally established on 25 January 1940 under orders from President Franklin Roosevelt.  The Coast Guard, in cooperation with the U. S

Submarine Force Participates in Ice Exercise 2007

Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine USS Alexandria (SSN 757) is submerged after surfacing through two feet of ice during ICEX-07, a U.S. Navy and Royal Navy exercise conducted on and under a drifting ice floe about 180 nautical miles off the north coast of Alaska. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Shawn P. EklundCommander, Submarine Force has announced the participation of USS Alexandria (SSN 757), home ported in Groton, Conn., in a joint U.S

GAO: Limited Commercial Arctic Development Foreseen

Arctic Tow: File photo

Decreasing seasonal sea ice has opened up Arctic waters for longer periods with resulting potential economic opportunities in commercial shipping, cruises, commercial fishing, oil, and mining. In light of the importance of U.S. efforts to effectively manage Arctic issues, GAO was asked to examine U.S. actions related to developing and investing in Arctic maritime infrastructure, which it did without making any recommendations.

Huge Waves Measured for First Time in Arctic Ocean

J. Thomson / University of Washington

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle of this century. Storms thus have the potential to create Arctic swell – huge waves that could add a new and unpredictable element to the region. A University of Washington researcher made the first study of waves in the middle of the Arctic Ocean

Arctic Research Explores the ‘Roomba’ Approach

CG Arctic test 3 chew ice.jpg

The pace and quality of oil spill research in the United States typically ebbs and flows as a function of two, if not three important variables. First, after the 1989 Exxon Valdez grounding, there was a flurry of activity to ramp up oil spill research because it had been dormant for so long. The need was recognized, with plenty of money made available. Primarily, this research centered on conventional spill remediation techniques – for example

EU Project Aims to Improve Arctic Shipping Safety

Image: SEDNA Consortium

 A three-year, €6.5 million ($7.7  million) research project has been launched to address safety and efficiency in Arctic ship operations. Funded by the EU’s Horizon 2020 program, SEDNA sets out to develop a risk-based approach to Arctic navigation, ship design and maritime operations.   Recent years have seen a rapid increase in shipping operations in Arctic regions, as ice cover has reduced due to global warming

LNG Carrier Sets Northern Sea Route Record

Christophe de Margerie (Photo: Sovcomflot)

On August 17, 2017, the Sovcomflot-owned icebreaking liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier Christophe de Margerie completed her first commercial voyage, transporting LNG through the Northern Sea Route (NSR) from Norway to South Korea. During this voyage, the vessel set a new time record for an NSR transit of 6 days 12 hours and 15 minutes. Moreover, Christophe de Margerie has also become the world’s first merchant vessel to travel the full length of the NSR without any icebreaker escort.

ABB’s Azipod Writes History in the Arctic

(Photo: ABB)

Sovcomflot’s liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier Christophe de Margerie made the world’s first-ever crossing of the Northern Sea in late August without the aid of an ice-breaker. The record-setting vessel is powered by ABB’s advanced Azipod electric propulsion technology.   The 172,600 cubic meters Arctic LNG tanker, which features a lightweight steel reinforced hull, is the largest commercial ship to receive Arc7 certification

Aker Arctic’s Ice Lab is Back in Acton

(Photo: Aker Arctic)

 The Finnish icebreaking season typically ends in May. Around the same time, the cooling system in Aker Arctic’s ice laboratory in Helsinki, Finland, is turned off and the model basin is allowed to warm up for the annual summer maintenance break.   Aker Arctic operates its own ice model testing facility at the company’s main office in Helsinki, Finland. Using the in-house developed FGX model ice

Arctic Sea Ice May Vanish Even If World Achieves Climate Goal

© Andreas Altenburger / Adobe Stock

Arctic sea ice may vanish in summers this century even if governments achieve a core target for limiting global warming set by almost 200 nations in 2015, scientists said on Monday.   Arctic sea ice has been shrinking steadily in recent decades, damaging the livelihoods of indigenous peoples and wildlife such as polar bears while opening the region to more shipping and oil and gas exploration.   Under the 2015 Paris Agreement

Ice Kings: Model Testing Ship-ice Interactions

The CCGS John G. Diefenbaker model remotely-controlled by a former icebreaker captain while it was being tested in the ice tank. (Photo: National Research Council of Canada)

Model testing ship-ice interactions in the St. John’s ice tank   In a cavernous room in the heart of a research center in St. John’s, Newfoundland at 8 am, the air temperature is -20 C while the water temperature is hovering at zero. National Research Council of Canada (NRC) staff are preparing the Ice Tank to test the integrity of a newly designed ship’s hull and propulsion system by subjecting a model to a battery of maneuvers and encounters with ice

Arctic Ice Loss Driven by Natural Swings, Not Just Mankind -Study

© z576 / Adobe Stock

Natural swings in the Arctic climate have caused up to half the precipitous losses of sea ice around the North Pole in recent decades, with the rest driven by man-made global warming, scientists said on Monday.   The study indicates that an ice-free Arctic Ocean, often feared to be just years away, in one of the starkest signs of man-made global warming, could be delayed if nature swings back to a cooler mode.  

Arctic Ice Sets New Record Low for Winter

Photo: NOAA

The extent of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has set a new record low for the wintertime in a region strongly affected by long-term trends of global warming, U.S. and European scientists said on Wednesday.   Sea ice around the North Pole expands to its biggest extent of the year in February or March after a deep freeze in the winter polar darkness and shrinks to the smallest of the year in September, at the end of the brief Arctic summer.  

Western Great Lakes Icebreaking Completed

The U.S. Coast Guard has concluded its domestic ice breaking operations in support of commercial navigation, known as Operation Taconite, throughout the Western Great Lakes, Tuesday.   As a result of warmer temperatures this winter, ice coverage was less than the multi-year average and had no significant impact on commercial navigation on the Great Lakes. Nearly all of the ice that formed has melted.   Six Coast Guard cutters assigned to Operation Taconite conducted nearly 2

The Icebergs Are Coming: Shipping in the North Atlantic

Distance has to be kept: Icebergs can harm the ships. The only ships coming consciously close to the icebergs are cruisers with ice class. The picture is taken off one of them, the Hanseatic from Hapag-Lloyd Cruises. (Photo: Hapag-Lloyd)

 At present, several icebergs are drifting out of the Arctic Ocean and into the North Atlantic. This natural phenomenon occurs each year in the period roughly stretching between April and August. During this season, these massive chunks of ice cross the major shipping routes on the North Atlantic. But German container carrier Hapag-Lloyd is prepared for them, as the company’s captains keep their vessels south of the drift ice limit so as to avoid any dangerous collisions.  

Melting Sea Ice: A Canary in the Coal Mine

© André Gilden / Adobe Stock

The rapid loss of Arctic sea ice is a sentinel. Most of us will never venture into the Arctic, but it can and does provide us with a forewarning of impacts coming to our parts of the Earth – and some of the most significant impacts will directly affect the maritime industry.   In earlier times, coal miners were sometimes overcome by the buildup of odorless carbon monoxide gas. Some died as a consequence. Eventually it was realized that canaries were more susceptible to the gas

Giant Iceberg Breaks off Antarctica

Thermal wavelength image of a large iceberg, which has calved off the Larsen C ice shelf. Darker colors are colder, and brighter colors are warmer, so the rift between the iceberg and the ice shelf appears as a thin line of slightly warmer area. Image from July 12, 2017, from the MODIS instrument on NASAs Aqua satellite. (Image: NASA Worldview)

One of the biggest icebergs on record has broken away from Antarctica, scientists said on Wednesday, creating an extra hazard for ships around the continent as it breaks up.   The one trillion tonne iceberg, measuring 5,800 square km, calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica sometime between July 10 and 12, said scientists at the University of Swansea and the British Antarctic Survey.   The iceberg, which is roughly the size of the U.S

Nautical Institute Rolls Out Ice Navigator Scheme

Logo Image: The Standard Club, Nautical Institute

 The Standard Club has advised its members that at the start of July the Nautical Institute launched its Ice Navigator Scheme. This scheme is designed to help meet the demand for properly trained officers with the skills and knowledge to handle a ship in ice.   The scheme is designed to run in conjunction with the Polar Code and builds on STCW requirements. It focuses on the practical elements necessary to handle a ship and manage operations in ice covered waters worldwide; it is

Ice Navigation Training for Maersk Line Officers

Maersk Line meets Polar Code Deck Officer Training requirements through a series of tailor-made Ice navigation courses by Aboa Mare in Finland   Deck officers and captains from Maersk Line have begun a series of ice navigation training courses at Aboa Mare in Turku, Finland. The first course was taught in July, with the rest scheduled to take place during the second half of 2017.   The courses fulfill the Polar Code training requirements and are designed according to the

Arctic Thaw helps Russian Shipping

File Image ((c) Paul Brown)

Arctic thaw aids shipping most along Russian coast; Russia to start LNG exports from Yamal in late 2017.   Russian shipping in the Arctic is benefiting from winds that are driving the oldest and thickest sea ice towards North America, further opening a remote region that is thawing amid global warming, scientists say.   The thinning Russian ice could help liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers, due to start exports from Russia's Yamal Peninsula in late 2017

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2017 - The Marine Design Annual

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