Marine Link
Monday, October 23, 2017

Aquatic Nuisance

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force to Meet

The Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force/National Invasive Species Council (NISC) Prevention Committee, sponsored by the Fish and Wildlife Service, will meet in Washington, DC on May 4. Items on the agenda include review and approval of the Roles and Responsibilities draft document; identification of the Prevention Committee member’s responsibilities to the five working groups; and discussion of actions required to get working groups functioning. 69 Fed. Reg. 21569 (HK Law).

Great Ships Initiative to Combat Aquatic Nuisance Species

Ports of Indiana officials will join industry and government leaders in Duluth on Wednesday to announce the launch of the Great Ships Initiative, a $3.5m research center that is the first in the Great Lakes region designed to specifically focus on developing the technology necessary to prevent the introduction of aquatic nuisance species into the Great Lakes by ocean-going ships. Leaders of over a dozen major U.S. and Canadian Great Lakes ports will be joined by scientists and federal agency

Michigan to Regulate Ballast Water Discharges

The State of Michigan enacted two laws intended to regulate discharges in the state of ballast water from ocean-going ships. Act No. 32 broadly prohibits injurious discharges and specifically prohibits unauthorized discharges of ballast water from oceangoing ships. Act No. 33 provides that, effective January 1, 2007, an ocean-going ship may not engage in port operations in the state unless it has a permit and that, to obtain a permit

Bill introduced re ballast water management

Senator Inouye (D-HI) introduced the Ballast Water Management Act of 2004 (S. 2490) to amend the Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990 to establish vessel ballast water management requirements, and for other purposes. This lengthy bill raises various issues, including its inconsistency with the recently developed international convention on ballast water management. Source; HK Law

Hyde OptiMarin System Controls Aquatic Nuisances

Hyde OptiMarin LLC, a joint venture of Hyde Marine Inc. of Cleveland, Ohio and OptiMarin A/S of Stavanger Norway, is delivering four new full-scale OptiMar Ballast Water Treatment Systems during 2001, systems designed to control the spread of Aquatic Nuisance Species in ship's ballast water. Hyde OptiMarin delivered the first ever full-scale ballast water treatment system using ultraviolet light with cyclonic separation pretreatment for installation aboard the cruise ship "Regal Princess"

Chicago Sanitary & Ship Canal Safety Zone

The US Coast Guard issued a notice stating that, from 6:00 a.m. on November 3 through 6:00 p.m. on November 5, it will enforce the safety zone from Mile Marker 296.1 to Mile Marker 296.7 on the Chicago Sanitary & Ship Canal. This action is necessary to reduce risks associated with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) installation of parasitic structures intended to help control the spread of aquatic nuisance species. 75 Fed. Reg. 64673 (October 20, 2010).

Ballast Water Inspections Improve, GL/Seaway

A new U.S. government report released March 13 showed a notable increase in the number of ballast tank inspections of oceangoing commercial ships entering the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System from outside U.S. or Canadian waters.  Ship operators also improved their compliance with ballast water requirements in 2008 compared with 2007, the report says. The 2008 Summary of Great Lakes Seaway Ballast Water Working Group released by the U.S. Coast Guard examined the U.S

NAMEPA Present Award to U.S. Coast Guard

September 21, 2009 Clay Maitland, Founding Chairman of the North American Marine Environment Protection Association (NAMEPA), announced that the United States Coast Guard is the recipient of NAMEPA’s 2009 Marine Environment Protection Award.  The award will be presented at NAMEPA’s Awards Dinner to be held in New York in conjunction with the 2009 World Maritime Day Parallel Event on October 16th. Commandant Allen will be present to accept the award.

RINA Group Delivers Ballast Water Management Guidance

Photo: RINA

International classification society RINA has completely revised and updated its guidance on the Ballast Water Convention and the procurement, installation, operation and certification of Ballast Water Treatment Systems. The guidance is now available to shipowners, shipyards and equipment manufacturers as a Technical Bulletin.   Dino Cervetto, Director of Technical Services, RINA Services, says, “The IMO Ballast Water Convention is almost certainly going to come into force in 2016

Ballast Water Management Systems: Let the Games Begin

Costly Critter: Pictured is the Bythotrephes longimanus, more commonly known as the Spiny Water Flea, a species native to N. Europe and accidentally introduced through ballast water into Lake Huron in 1984. Emerging Ballast Water Treatment System rules will potentially cost shipowners millions per ship.  (Photo Source: Michigan Sea Grant; Spiny Flea Information Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture)

With the accession by Finland to the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (better known as the Ballast Water Management or BWM Convention), there are now sufficient ratifications for the Convention to enter into force.  Entry into force will occur on 8 September 2017.  It has been an agonizingly slow process for a convention that was adopted with such high hopes.  

Global Treaty to Halt Invasive Aquatic Species On

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

 A key international measure for environmental protection that aims to stop the spread of potentially invasive aquatic species in ships’ ballast water enters into force today (8 September 2017).    The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments (BWM Convention) requires ships to manage their ballast water to remove, render harmless, or avoid the uptake or discharge of aquatic organisms and pathogens within ballast water

Jamaica, Malta Accede to BWMC

Image: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

 Jamaica and Malta have become the latest States to sign up to International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s Ballast Water Management Convention – the international treaty requiring ships to manage their ballast water to help stop the spread of invasive aquatic species across the globe.    The Convention entered into force earlier this month (8 September) and a total of 65 signatories now represent 73.92% of the world's merchant fleet tonnage.  

Biofouling Management for Sustainable Shipping

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

 An IMarEST workshop workshop on practical biofouling management strategies just has concluded in Melbourne, Australia, September 12-15.    IMO is working actively to address biofouling issues by implementing practices to control and manage undesirable accumulation of aquatic organisms like, plants, algae and animals on ships’ hulls. One of the IMO’s main objective at the conference is to promote a new partnership project together with the

An Ocean for Life

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

 Over the last few decades, marine environments have undergone widespread deterioration.    To help turn this tide, the Our Ocean Conference 2017 held in Malta (2-3 October) brought together world leaders looking to commit to actions to reduce marine pollution, manage aquatic resources sustainably, mitigate climate change, and set up marine sanctuaries.     International Maritime Organization (IMO) attended the conference and reaffirmed its commitments made at

Impacts of Bio-fouling

Photo: International Maritime Organization

The issue of biofouling has been under the microscope at a series of national workshops delivered by International Maritime Organization (IMO), most recently, a national workshop held in Antananarivo, Madagascar (25-27 April).    All ships can experience a build-up of aquatic organisms on their underwater hull and structures, which is known as biofouling. This can impact on the ship speed and energy use, but it could also potentially see aquatic organisms transferred to new areas

ABN AMRO Finances Celsius BWTS Installs

Pic: ABN AMRO

 ABN AMRO Transportation has concluded financing for the installation of ballast water treatment systems on several vessels for its Danish client, Celsius Shipping.   As per September 8, 2017, the IMO Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) Convention will enter into force. The convention will stop the spread of invasive aquatic species, which can be a threat to local ecosystems and affect biodiversity.   

Biofouling Keep Out!

© Svetlana Yudina / Adobe Stock

Biofouling was a backburner issue until 5 March 2017. On that day the Government of New Zealand ordered the bulk carrier DL MARIGOLD out of NZ waters after the vessel’s hull was determined to be excessively fouled with potentially invasive organisms including barnacles and tube worms.    The bulker was not allowed back until it showed that the underwater surfaces had been thoroughly cleaned. This was the first known instance of a vessel expulsion due to biofouling

IMO Workshops on Fouling

 Biofouling – the build-up of aquatic organisms on a ship’s underwater hull and structures – was again on the agenda at the latest in a series of International Maritime Organization (IMO) workshops.    The regional workshop in Accra, Ghana (24-26 May) was attended by participants from nine countries (Cabo Verde, Equatorial Guinea, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Nigeria, Sao Tome & Principe and Sierra Leone).   

GloBallast Story Published at UN Ocean Conference

Photo: Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

 During the 20th century, tiny organisms carried in the ballast water of ships began to be recognized as alien invasive species.    These aquatic species were hitching a ride across the oceans and some were embedding themselves in new areas, multiplying and becoming harmful invasive aquatic species.    The impacts on native species, local ecosystems and sea-based economies have, in some cases, been devastating.   

Ballast Water Management Treaty Ratifications Boost

Pic: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

 Last week has seen four more States become Party to International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s Ballast Water Management Convention, designed to counter the threat to marine ecosystems by potentially invasive species transported in ships' ballast water.    The Convention enters into force on 8 September 2017 and will require ships to manage their ballast water, which can contain thousands of aquatic or marine microbes, plants and organisms

Caribbean Committed to Ballast Water Management

Infographic: International Maritime Organization

 A meeting of countries in the Wider Caribbean Region is renewing regional coordination to help implement International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s Ballast Water Management Convention and thereby minimize the transfer of harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens in ships' ballast water.  Topics discussed at the workshop, being held in Panama City (5-9 June), include ways for moving ratification and implementation forward throughout the region; exchanging information; a revised

Honduras Accedes to BWM Convention

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

 The number of States signed up to  International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s Ballast Water Management Convention has reached 61, with Honduras being the latest country acceding to the treaty.    The signatories now represent 68.46 % of the world's merchant fleet tonnage.    Under the treaty, ships are required to manage their ballast water, which can contain thousands of aquatic or marine microbes, plants and organisms

Dakuku Calls for Marine Ecosystem Conservation

Director, Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research, Dr. Parcy Obatola, Director General of the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA) Dr. Dakuku Peterside, Norwegian Ambassador to Nigeria Jens-Petter Kjemprud and the representative of the Lagos state commissioner for Agriculture, Emmanuel Audu at the Regional Conference on Marine Safety and Fisheries Protection, in Lagos. (Photo: NIMASA)

The Director General of the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA) Dr. Dakuku Peterside has stressed the need for concerted and collaborative efforts of all stakeholders toward the conservation and sustainable use of ocean resources for the protection of the environment and indeed the entire ecosystem.   The Director General who made this appeal while speaking at a 2-day Regional Conference on Marine Safety and Fisheries Protection organized by the United Nations

Researchers Study Hull Biofouling and Spread of Invasive Species

Photo: Subsea Industries

A new study seeks to determine the extent to which biofouling on ships’ hulls is contributing to the spread of invasive aquatic species in the Mediterranean Sea – a phenomenon commonly associated with ship ballasting operations. According to recent research published by Tel Aviv University’s School of Zoology, half the ships passing along the Mediterranean coast of Israel are carrying invasive ascidians, presenting a global threat to ecosystems around the world.

From GloBallast to GloFouling Partnerships

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

 Global Environment Facility (GEF) approves new project concept to address major aquatic invasive species vector.   A new global project to help protect marine ecosystems from the negative effects of invasive aquatic species has been given the go-ahead for preparation.    The GloFouling Partnerships project – a collaboration between the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the International Maritime Organization

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