Marine Link
Sunday, October 22, 2017

Korean Yards

S. Korea Eyes Cruise Building Market

Han Jong-chan assembles the massive blocks used to build ships at one of South Korea's huge and successful shipbuilding yards and has never been happier. Han has worked Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering's famed shipyard on remote Koje island here for 18 of his 38 years, recently on night shifts as hefty orders force workers to man giant cranes and welding shops around the clock. Despite a troubled past, a looming dispute with the European Union over subsidies and growing competition from China, the future is looking rosy -- particularly with Korean yards eyeing the potentially lucrative market for cruise ships. The port of Okpo is synonymous with the Daewoo Group and the efforts of its now disgraced founder, Kim Woo-choong, in rescuing a state-run shipyard devastated by the global oil shocks of the 1970s. Despite setbacks in the 1980s as the sector fell into a slump, the shipyard, helped by government subsidies, sailed smoothly through much of the 1990s, until exposure to weak Daewoo sister firms again spelled trouble. But unlike siblings such as bankrupt Daewoo Motor, which was rocked by the collapse of the group in 1999, the shipbuilder has struggled back, and workers such as Han are logging the overtime to prove it. "Yes, I feel tired physically," said Han. "But I am happy because the company is not going to lay us off as long as there is lots of work to do."

Report: Need for More Smaller Korean Yards Seen

According to Ariang News, several major Korean shipyards dominate the world shipbuilding market, but it looks like the industry could use more smaller players. Only 14 Korean shipyards made it to the world's top 100 shipbuilders. The list was compiled by the London-based market researcher Clarkson based on orders. The figure compares with 28 Japanese and 27 Chinese shipyards that made the cut. Analysts say this is because Korean shipbuilders have focused mainly on building large-scale

Japan Orders $1.8B in LNG Tankers

According to a Bloomberg report, Nippon Yusen K.K. and Mitsui O.S.K. Lines Ltd., Japan's two largest shipping lines, will join Qatar in ordering $1.8 billion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers to carry the fuel to North America. The ships will be built in as yet-unnamed South Korean yards. Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd., Japan's third-biggest shipping company, Iino Kaiun Kaisha Ltd. and trading house Mitsui & Co. are also among the investors, according to the report.

Wärtsilä Earns Repeat Order from Messina

Photo: Wärtsilä

Wärtsilä has been contracted by the Korean yard STX Offshore & Shipbuilding, to supply exhaust gas cleaning systems for four new Container Ro/Ro (ConRo) vessels being built for Ignazio Messina & Co, the Italy based ship owner and operator. This latest order will enable the new vessels to comply with both current and pending environmental legislation relating to exhaust emissions. For ships sailing in European waters, the maximum sulphur content will be limited to 0

RS to Class Newbuild Arctic Tankers

Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RS) has signed an agreement with South Korean yard Samsung Heavy Industries Co. LTD for design approval and survey under construction of a new series of 42,000 dwt Arctic shuttle oil carriers (project 42К Arctic Shuttle Tanker).    The new tankers are designed to complete a set of tasks of hydrocarbons transportation from Novoportovskoye field, which is situated in the north of Yamal peninsula, 30 km off the Gulf of Ob coast

Japan Seeks Share of LNG Carrier Shipbuilding Market

LNG Carrier by Kawasaki Heavy Industries

 Japanese market players ramp up their design efforts for fuel-efficient engines to challenge Korean yards as demand for super-cooled fuel is set to soar, says a report in South China Morning Post.    A total of 50 to 60 LNG ships annually are forecast to be delivered globally in 2017 and 2018, aided by US shale export projects, according to an estimate by analyst Masanori Wakae at Mizuho Securities.   

Korean Shipyards Hold Lead in Market

Yonhap reported that South Korean shipyards have unparalleled competitiveness despite recent challenges posed by Chinese shipyards, industry and government sources said. The optimistic predictions come as alarm bells have been sounded over Chinese yards outpacing domestic companies in shipbuilding orders received in the first two months of this year. Such developments have caused some in China to boast that it can become the world's number one shipbuilding country by 2015.

Yangzijiang Shipbuilding Eyes Mega Container Ships

yang.gif

Reuters - Yangzijiang Shipbuilding Holdings Ltd, a top Chinese shipbuilder, plans to build more mega container ships for shipowners eager to cut operating costs. Yangzijiang is China's third-largest listed shipbuilder by market capitalisation and has boasted profit margins that dwarf those of domestic and overseas peers.   Yangzijiang is ready to hand over its first mega container ship in March, which can move around 10,000 standard twenty-foot (TEU) containers

StealthGas Announces Newbuilds, New Vessel Contracts

StealthGas Inc., a ship-owning company primarily serving the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sector of the international shipping industry, announced today as part of its fleet expansion program the acquisition of two newbuilding LPG vessels. The company exercised the acquisition options with a Korean yard and the additions to the fleet consist of two 22,000 cbm semi refrigerated eco LPG carriers scheduled to be delivered in the second and third quarter of 2017, respectively

TMC Compressors for Höegh FSRU

Photo: Höegh LNG

TMC Compressors (TMC) said it has penned a contract with shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries to supply a complete marine compressed air system to a new-build floating storage and regasification unit (FSRU) the South Korean yard is building for Höegh LNG.    TMC scope of work includes engineering, manufacturing and supply of a complete compressed air system consisting of 2 x 44 kW service air compressors and 2 x 44 kW control air compressors.   

Korean Shipyards Bag $1.5bln Newbuild Order from MSC

 Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI) and Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) - two major shipyards in South Korea -  are poised to sign a deal worth $1.5 billion to build container ships for Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC), according to the Financial Times.   The report said that this deal is the latest signal that the South Korea’s troubled shipbuilding industry is showing signs of recovery

HMM Orders New Carriers

File Photo: Hyundai Merchant Marine

 South Korea’s largest ocean carrier Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM) will invest USD 417.61 million in five new very large crude oil carriers (VLCCs), Reuters reported quoting company sources.   "HMM will invest 470 billion South Korean won (U.S. $418 million) in new facilities for the construction of five, 300,000 deadweight ton (DWT) VLCCs with Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME), with an option for five more," said company sources.  

Smart Ships: Inmarsat, Samsung Heavy Industries Partner

Ronald Spithout, Inmarsat Maritime President (Photo: Inmarsat)

Satellite communications services provider Inmarsat said it has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with shipbuilder Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI), establishing a relationship to leverage the ‘smart ship’ connectivity offered by Fleet Xpress at the vessel construction stage.    The agreement envisages the South Korean yard installing Inmarsat-approved terminal hardware and offering applications to cover remote machinery diagnostics and CCTV services

Oldendorff Revives Newbuild Contracts at Samjin

(Photo: Oldendorff)

 Last month saw the resurrection of two newbuilding contracts, which Oldendorff had concluded originally in June 2012 with Weihai-based Samjin Shipbuilding Ind. Co Ltd (SSI), at the time controlled by Korean shareholders. The initial order was for four 36,000 dwt Handysize newbuildings of the Korean designed FESDEC-36k eco type.   The yard went through financial restructuring due to the problems of its Korean parent

DSME CEO Questioned over Accounting Fraud

Photo by DSME Co.,Ltd

 The chief executive of struggling Korean shipbuilder Daewoo was questioned by state prosecutors on Tuesday over allegations that the yard tried to cover a major deficit in 2015 by underreporting losses.   According to a report in Yonhap, Jung Sung-leep, 66, appeared before the Seoul Central District Prosecutors' Office as a suspect on charges of violating the Act on External Audit of Stock Companies.  

Royal Caribbean cuts South Korean Ports from China Cruises

Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd will remove visits to South Korean ports from its China cruises, the firm said in a statement, amid rising tension between the two countries over Seoul's deployment of a U.S. missile defence system.   In a post on its Chinese website, the U.S. cruise operator, one of the world's biggest, said it had changed its China-based cruises to remove visits to popular South Korean resorts because of "recent developments regarding the situation in South Korea"

Singapore’s Survivability

New business: Keppel has begun building dredgers like the Cristobal Colon, seen hear outside Rio de Janeiro. (Photo: copyright Jan de Nul Offshore)

Singapore’s shipyards are looking to recent investments in capacity, design and newly acquired technology to combat order declines after a decades-long offshore buildup. Sembcorp and peer Keppel are making the most of partnerships in FLNG and showing signs they’ll be okay through the downturn, helped by their gas-hungry Australasian backyard and renewed ties with old charterer parties and suppliers.  

Daewoo Shipbuilding to Get Fresh $2.6 Bln Bailout

File photo: Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co Ltd

South Korean state banks are preparing a fresh $2.6 billion bailout for floundering Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co Ltd, which has built up huge losses from offshore projects and risks missing debt repayments.   Daewoo, Hyundai Heavy Industries and Samsung Heavy Industries are South Korea's top shipbuilders - a massive economic force and a source of national pride. But they slipped into the red in 2015 amid a commodities downturn and bleak trade volumes

Death Toll Rises in Korean Shipyard Accident

 A crane has collapsed at Samsung Heavy Industries shipyard in South Korea, killing six workers and injuring 22, reports Reuters.   The South Korean shipbuilder quoted as saying that rescuers are searching for people trapped under debris after the 32-tonne crane fell on a ship at its shipyard on Geoje island.   The incident took place during the construction of an oil platform for French energy company Total's Martin Linge field off Norway.  

New Ship Building Orders for Korean Yards

Photo: Samsung Heavy Industries

 South Korean shipyards emerged on top for new orders in April, Business Korea reported quoting industry data.   The global total amount of new shipbuilding orders reached 750,000 CGT last month and 340,000 CGT and 260,000 CGT went to South Korean and Chinese shipbuilders, respectively.    Japanese shipyard orders came to nil. In terms of numbers, Korean shipyards clinched new orders to build 12 ships.  

Death Toll On The Rise at Chittagong Shipbreaking Yards

Photo Courtesy: NGO Shipbreaking Platform – Hanjin Rome beached in Chittagong, Bangladesh

 Two workers lost their lives at the Chittagong shipbreaking yards in the last two weeks, bringing the total death toll this year to six workers, reports NGO Shipbreaking Platform.   On 6 May, 26-year-old Shahinoor died at Jamuna Shipbreaking yard. He fell from a great height when he was breaking the Hanjin Rome, which was the first vessel arrested after the collapse of one of the largest container ship companies last year – the Korean company Hanjin Shipping.   

Korean Shipyards Look Bullish

Photo: Hyundai Shipbuilding Division

 South Korea's major shipyards are estimated to have racked up solid profit during the second quarter of the year, aided by the increased delivery of ships, cost-cutting measures and a rise in new orders, Yonhap reported citing industry sources. Another report said that Korean yards have clinched the most new shipbuilding orders in the first half of the year, with their combined tally more than doubling from a year earlier. The trend appears bullish for ship building in the country.

Aqualis Lands Audit Work for LNG Carrier

Offshore marine and engineering consultancy Aqualis Offshore, part of Oslo-listed Aqualis ASA, said it has been contracted by Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries Co. Ltd to provide an engineering study of a new-build liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier the yard is constructing for Teekay LNG.   Aqualis Offshore’s work scope is to provide failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), hazard dentification (HAZID) and hazard and operability (HAZOP) studies for the boil-off gas handling

Out of 210 Ships, 158 Hit South Asian Beaches in Q2

Image: NGO Shipbreaking Platform

 There were a total of 210 ships broken in the second quarter of 2017. 158 of these ships ended up on South Asian beaches for dirty and dangerous breaking, said NGO Shipbreaking Platform.   The Platform was able to document five accidents at the shipbreaking yards in Chittagong, Bangladesh, between April and June, which led to the death of four workers and the injury of two.   Ishaq worked as a winch operator and died struck by a cable at the BBC Steel Shipbreaking/KR yard

Shipbuilding: Mega Yards

Arctic Firsts: Arc 7 LNG carriers, including the Risunok and the ice-breaking Christophe de Margerie (pictured here). (Photo Courtesy: Yamal LNG and Sovcomflot)

The Woodmac report we saw offered us cause for pause — “Strong activity from the (major oil companies)” while “national oil companies have tightened their purse strings.” What Maritime Reporter found, was that national oil companies — nation-builders, for many — are putting their money in affiliate shipyards. The hope of two, new shipbuilding giants is jobs, innovation, national survival and export security

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2017 - The Marine Design Annual

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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