Marine Link
Sunday, October 22, 2017

Navy Planes

This Day in Coast Guard History – Feb. 8

1958-A U.S. Navy P5M aircraft enroute from San Juan to Norfolk lost one engine and changed course to the island of San Salvador, British West Indies, to attempt a night ditching.  AIRSTA Miami sent up a Coast Guard UF amphibian plane, later reinforced by a second amphibian.  After contacting the disabled US Navy plane, the pilot of the first amphibian talked the Navy pilot out of attempting to ditch without benefit of illumination and alerted the commanding officer of the Coast Guard LORAN station on San Salvador for assistance after ditching.  In true Coast Guard tradition, the LORAN station's CO borrowed a truck and an 18-foot boat to assist.  The commanding officer managed to be on the scene 1 1/2 miles offshore, when the Navy P5M landed with two minutes of fuel remaining.  While one of the amphibians provided additional illumination, the Navy plane was guided through a dangerous reef to a mooring, using her operative port engine.  There were no casualties. 2007-The CGC Storis was decommissioned after 64 years of service. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)  

Abandoned Cruise Ship Sinks off Thailand

Image: Thai PBS

 Chinese cruise ship "Ocean Dream" , anchored off Laem Chanang port in Sri Racha for over a year, sank into the sea today, raising fear by Thai environmental authorities that it could cause pollution in the sea.   Ocean Dream capsized on Saturday while anchored around 2 miles off Laem Chabang port located in Sri Racha on Thailand’s east coast. Local news reports the vessel had been abandoned by the owners for over a year.  

Venezuela and Spain Seal Military Deal

Spain and Venezuela signed $2 billion arms deal in which Madrid agreed to supply Caracas with 12 transport planes and eight navy patrol boats. Venezuela's Defense Minister Admiral Orlando Maniglia and Spanish Defense Minister José Bono signed the deal at a ceremony, according to reports. It is said that U.S. officials in Venezuela have asked Spain not to go ahead with the deal saying the planes and ships contain U.S. technology and therefore require a U.S. export license

This Day in Naval History - June 11

From the Navy News Service 1853 - Five Navy ships leave , on three-year exploring expedition to survey the far Pacific. 1927 - USS Memphis arrives at , , with Charles Lindbergh and his plane, Spirit of St. Louis, after his non-stop flight across the . 1944 - battleships off provide gunfire support. 1953 - Navy ships evacuate 20,000 Koreans from to safety south of 17th parallel.

This Day in Naval History - July 16

From the Navy News Service 1862 - Congress creates rank of Rear Admiral. David G. Farragut is named the first Rear Admiral. 1912 - Rear Adm. Bradley Fiske receives patent for torpedo plane, or airborne torpedo. 1915 - First Navy ships, battleships USS Ohio (BB 12), USS Missouri (BB 11), and USS Wisconsin (BB 9) transit Panama Canal. 1945 - First atomic bomb test at Alamogordo, N.M.

Aviator & Engineer: Lawrence Burst Sperry

Elmer A. Sperry with his son, pilot Lawrence Burst Sperry, an inventor in his own right, with 23 patents pending or granted, including one for a self-contained parachute. (Photo: Hagley Museum and Library)

A chip off the old block makes aeronautics his claim to fame   The U.S. Navy, and the aeronautic field in general, has benefited enormously from the genius of more than one Sperry.  Lawrence Burst Sperry, the second son and third child of gyrocompass inventor Elmer A. Sperry was a pioneer in instrumental flight and famous inventor in his own right, launching the Lawrence Sperry Aircraft Co. at 26, and earning 23 patents before his untimely death at the age of 31 in 1923

Fishing Vessel Sinks

Seven Spanish crewmen were missing after a Spanish fishing vessel sank in rough seas off the coast of Portugal on Thursday, Reuters reported. The spokesman said that four other sailors, also Spanish, had been rescued from a life raft after the sinking but that the search was continuing for the remaining crew from the "Fatima" which went down in the Atlantic some 150 nautical miles (300 km) west of Lisbon. A Portuguese navy ship and two Spanish boats were involved in the search and a Portuguese

This Day in Naval History – July 16

1862 - Congress creates rank of Rear Admiral. David G. Farragut is named the first Rear Admiral 1912 - Rear Admiral Bradley Fiske receives patent for torpedo plane or airborne torpedo. 1915 - First Navy ships, battleships Ohio, Missouri, and Wisconsin transit Panama Canal. 1945 - First atomic bomb test at Alamogordo, NM. (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in Naval History – July 16, 2009

1862 - Congress creates rank of Rear Admiral. David G. Farragut is named the first Rear Admiral 1912 - Rear Admiral Bradley Fiske receives patent for torpedo plane or airborne torpedo. 1915 - First Navy ships, battleships Ohio, Missouri, and Wisconsin transit Panama Canal. 1945 - First atomic bomb test at Alamogordo, NM. (Source: Navy News Service)

Turkey, Pakistan Sign Warship Deal

Turkey and Pakistan have signed a memorandum of understanding for the sale of four Turkish made corvette warships and 52 Pakistan-made training planes for Ankara's armed forces, Turkey's defence industry undersecretariat said on Wednesday. Karachi Shipyard (KS&EW) will buy four corvettes made under Turkey's MILGEM warship programme, aimed at designing and building locally a fleet of multipurpose corvettes and frigates that will replace older ships.

Sailing, Sailing, over the Grassy Waves

(Photo courtesy Polish Tourist Organisation)

It is a tram or a train? Neither, it's a boat.   Pleasure craft using Poland's Elblag Canal can appear to be seen as sailing through grassy plains as they follow tracks on land in an unusual solution for dealing with elevation on the waterway.   The canal, approximately 240km (150 miles) north of Warsaw, uses a system of five inclined planes between its lakes, which are too steep to be navigated using locks.   Rail tracks run carriages to transport the boats.  

Are US Navy Accidents Linked to Budget Caps?

Visible damage to the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain, which was involved in a collision with a merchant vessel while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore. (U.S. Navy photo by Joshua Fulton)

U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said on Monday that he was working to see if there was a link between a spate of recent military accidents and budget caps, but said he could not draw a direct line at this time.   Since June, more than 70 U.S. service members have either been killed or injured in training or non-combat accidents, ranging from two naval collisions in Asia to a Marine Corps transport plane crash in rural Mississippi.  

Migrant Boat Sinks off Turkish Coast, Four Dead

Four people drowned when a fishing boat carrying migrants sank off the Turkish coast in the Marmara Sea on Friday, the coast guard said in a statement.   The boat sank off the northwestern province of Kocaeli shortly after calling for help. The statement said 38 migrants were rescued. The coastguard was seeking 15 to 20 others and was being assisted by two helicopters, planes and commercial boats.   The origin of the migrants and their destination was not immediately clear.

Australian Navy Commissions Hobart (II) – One in a Million

HMAS Hobart returning to Sydney Harbour for the last time prior to being decommisioned. Photo: Royal Australian Navy.

 Royal Australian Navy will commission the first of three new destroyers today (On 23 September). In continuing our reflective stories of previous ships that have carried the name HMAS Hobart, this is the story of Hobart (II).   The second ship to bear the name Hobart was one of three Perth class guided missile destroyers built in the United States for the Royal Australian Navy.   She was commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard on 18 December 1965 under the command of Captain

Russian Navy Chief Visits India

Photo:  Indian Navy

 Admiral Vladimir Korolev, Commander-in-Chief, Russian Federation Navy along with a four member Russian Navy delegation is on an official visit to India from 15 to 18 March 2017. The visit aims to consolidate bilateral naval relations between India and Russia, as also to explore new avenues for naval cooperation.   During his visit, the Commander-in-Chief of Russian Navy held bilateral discussions with Admiral Sunil Lanba, PVSM, AVSM, ADC

Trump's Navy: A Look at the Future US Navy

President Donald J. Trump speaks with Sailors in the hangar bay aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). Trump visited to meet with Sailors and shipbuilders of the Navy’s first-in-class aircraft carrier during an all-hands call inside the ship’s hangar bay. (U.S. Navy photo by Joshua Sheppard)

It’s still too early to know for certain what the new administration will do about building up the U.S. Navy, as the numbers are a moving target. But with President Trump’s recent pledge to add $54 billion to defense spending, it’s a safe bet to make that the fleet will grow.    So let’s start with the numbers. There are different ways to count the fleet size, including whether or not you count auxiliaries

Fast Small Ship Simulator

Photo: MARIN

Bouncing over the waves at a speed of 43 knots, the director of the Defense Materiel Organization (DMO) Vice Admiral Arie Jan de Waard, and MARIN’s director Bas Buchner, made the first test voyage on the moving ‘Fast Small Ship Simulator.’ This FSSS is built by MARIN and SME partners, Cruden and TreeC, as part of a CODEMO project to stimulate the development of a prototype. Vice Admiral De Waard felt the test was very realistic and said: “You feel as if you are involved

New Commander at US Navy Installations Command

Photo: United States Navy

 Vice Adm. Mary M. Jackson relieved Vice Adm. Dixon R. Smith at a change of command ceremony for Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) March 31, at the Washington Navy Yard.   The ceremony included the presentation of colors by the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard color guard, national anthem by the U.S. Navy Band and remarks from guest speaker, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson.   "While here

Korean Cargo Ship Missing

A large South Korean cargo ship with 24 crew on board is believed to have sunk in the Atlantic Ocean after making an SOS call, News agencies reported quoting the Uruguayan navy.   The Stellar Daisy was missing after making its last contact in the South Atlantic about 2,500 kilometres (1,500 miles) from shore, South Korea's foreign ministry and news reports said on Sunday.   On Friday, a crew member sent a text saying the 312m-long (1024ft) Stellar Daisy freighter was taking on

General Dynamics Christens Future USS Thomas Hudner

Capt. Thomas Hudner Jr. attends the christening of the future USS Thomas Hudner at the Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine on Saturday, April 1, 2017. Capt. Hudner is a Medal of Honor recipient for his valor in the Korean War, when he intentionally crash landed his plane in an effort to save fellow pilot Ensign Jesse Brown, the Navys first African-American pilot. (Photo: General Dynamics)

On April 1, General Dynamics Bath Iron Works christened the U.S. Navy’s newest guided-missile destroyer, Thomas Hudner (DDG 116).   The ship is named for Capt. Thomas Hudner Jr., who intentionally crash landed his plane in an effort to save Ensign Jesse Brown, the nation’s first African-American Navy pilot, during the Korean War’s Chosin Reservoir campaign.   The Saturday morning christening ceremony took place at Bath Iron Works’ shipyard and was attended

COSCO Singapore Wins FSRU Deal

Photo: Cosco Shipyard

 Cosco (Qidong) Shipyard Co, a subsidiary of Cosco Corp's 51 per cent subsidiary Cosco Shipyard Group Co, has entered into an agreement with a European buyer for the construction of the floating storage regasification unit (FSRU) module.   Cosco Corp did not identify the European buyer. COSCO Qidong and the European buyer have agreed to keep the contract prices confidential.    Delivery of the module is scheduled for the first quarter of 2018.  

Dozens of Migrants Rescued from Burning Rubber Dinghy

Dozens of migrants were rescued at the weekend after jumping from a rubber dinghy that had burst into flames as they tried to get to Spain across the Mediterranean Sea. A Portuguese Air Force plane spotted the boat and managed to save all 34 migrants with the help of the sea rescue service from the Spanish city of Almeria. Video taken from the plane on Sunday and released on Monday by the European border agency, Frontex, shows flames spreading from the dinghy's outboard motor.

Iridium Launches Latest 10 NEXT Satellites

Iridium NEXT. Photo: Iridium Communications Inc.

Iridium has launched 10 of its Iridium NEXT satellites US aboard a SpaceX rocket launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.   This payload of 10 satellites was deployed into low-Earth orbit, approximately one hour after a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Vandenberg, at 1:25pm PDT (20:25 UTC).    With this launch complete, there are now 20 Iridium NEXT satellites in orbit, establishing the infrastructure for groundbreaking technologies such as Iridium Certus

US Navy to Commission John Finn Today

Photo: United States Navy

 The Navy will commission its newest guided-missile destroyer, the future USS John Finn (DDG 113), during a 10 a.m. HAST ceremony Saturday, July 15, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.   The new destroyer honors Chief Aviation Ordnanceman John Finn, who received the Medal of Honor for heroism during the first attack by Japanese airplanes at Pearl Harbor. While under heavy machine gun fire, Finn manned a

Iridium Announces Third Iridium NEXT Launch Date

File Image: Credit Iridium

Iridium Communications Inc. (NASDAQ: IRDM) has announced that the upcoming Iridium NEXT launch has been targeted for September 30, 2017 at 6:30 a.m. PDT.   This launch will deliver another 10 Iridium NEXT satellites to orbit on SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket and will bring the total number of Iridium NEXT satellites deployed to 30. SpaceX selected the September 30th launch date based on rocket and Vandenberg Air Force Base range availability

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2017 - The Marine Design Annual

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