Marine Link
Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Navy Research

University of Hawaii Pushing Navy Research Center

Some University of Hawaii officials and faculty members are still pushing for a Navy research center on campus despite the Faculty Senate's rejection of the project, according to an AP story. University lawyers are reviewing the contract for a Navy University Affiliated Research Center to address concerns of faculty leaders who recently voted against the proposed military partnership. The vote against the center could be overturned if 100 professors sign a petition asking for a vote of all Manoa campus faculty members, according to the report. University faculty representatives voted 31-18 against the center, with opponents expressing fear it could disrupt existing programs, set up publication restrictions on research and allow for weapons development on campus. Proponents, however, say the center, which would be the nation's first new one in more than 50 years, would bring millions in Department of Defense grants in its first five years of operation. The country's four Navy-backed centers are at the University of Washington, Penn State University, Johns Hopkins University and the University of Texas-Austin. Source: Associated Press

Allied Marine Crane Outfits R/V Neil Armstrong

(Photo: Allied Marine Crane)

The U.S. Navy’s research vessel Neil Armstrong (AGOR-27), scheduled for completion this year, is equipped with a modern array of oceanographic research equipment. To handle this equipment, Allied Marine Crane, a division of Allied Systems, Co., was chosen to design and manufacture two cranes, one A-frame, one davit, two handling systems and two hydraulic power units. Allied Marine Crane equipment was specified based on their history with research equipment handling

New Naval Engineering Education Center

The U.S. Navy's Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) signed a contract agreement May 6 to establish a Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC).  The purpose of the NEEC will be to educate and develop world-class naval systems engineers for the Navy's civilian acquisition, engineering and science workforce.    Led by the University of Michigan, the NEEC Consortium will initially be comprised of 15 colleges and universities

Navy to Commission LPD 22 – 'USS San Diego'

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USN to commission Amphibious Transport Dock Ship 'San Diego' The Navy will commission the newest San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship San Diego during a 10 a.m. PDT ceremony Saturday, May 19, 2012, in San Diego, Calif.

 The ship is named for the city of San Diego, principal homeport of the Pacific fleet, and honors the people of "America's Finest City" and its leaders for their continuous support of the military

New Scripps RV Honors Sally Ride

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U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus said the nation’s newest research vessel will be named R/V Sally Ride, in honor of the former UC San Diego faculty member who was the first American female astronaut and the youngest American to fly in space. The ship is owned by the U.S. Navy, will be operated by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, and will have its home port at the Scripps Nimitz Marine Facility in Point Loma on San Diego Bay.

Navy Leaders: Uncertainty Will Drive Innovation

Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Mat Winter, moderates a research, development, test and evaluation corporate board panel session during the Naval Future Force Science and Technology Expo. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

Department of Navy leaders at the Naval Future Force Science and Technology (S&T) EXPO in Washington D.C., February 5 called for investment in new ideas and scientific research to keep the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps technologically superior in increasingly uncertain times.   Sean J. Stackley, assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition, said tight budgets at home and technological advances by other nations must be met with a powerful response grounded

NSRP Executive Board Selects New R&D Projects

The Executive Control Board of the National Shipbuilding Research Program Advanced Shipbuilding Enterprise (NSRP ASE) has announced the selection of eleven new research projects as part of the Navy/Industry co-funded portfolio specifically designed to save taxpayers money in Navy shipbuilding and ship repair. The projects -- valued at approximately $32 million, including industry cost share -- were in response to the latest NSRP solicitation released in August

Naval Shipbuilders Try to Get More for Less

As it becomes abundantly clear that a major injection of dollars is not imminent for the U.S. Naval shipbuilding sector, industry leaders met recently to mull ideas on getting more for less. Several hundred people gathered at a recent Plenary Session of the American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE) to hear shipbuilding industry executives and Navy brass discuss how to produce more ships for the same dollar. Both agreed they must work together to achieve this goal.

MACSEA, Electric Boat Sign Development Agreement

MACSEA Ltd, a provider of software agent technology for prognostic machinery health monitoring, has signed a Co-Operative Research and Development Agreement with Electric Boat Corporation (A General Dynamics Company) of Groton, Conn. The goal is to further develop and demonstrate advanced technology for real-time maintenance decision-making in support of a minimum manned, highly automated and networked information infrastructure on future Navy ships

Navy Donates Research Sub to San Diego Maritime Museum

From Naval Sea Systems Command Public Affairs The U.S. Navy officially transferred the decommissioned research submarine ex-Dolphin (AGSS 555) to the Maritime Museum of San Diego (MMSD) during a donation contract signing ceremony Sept. 18 in Washington. The ceremony took place in the Washington office of U.S. Rep. Susan Davis. Ex-Dolphin was decommissioned in 2007 after more than 30 years of service supporting naval research activities from her homeport in San Diego.

Shipbuilding Shows the Way for Sustainability Management

Wärtsilän Marines Solutions -yksikön ympäristöliiketoiminnan johtaja, DI Juha Kytölä väittelee perjantaina Vaasan yliopistossa. Kytölä on tutkinut kestävän kehityksen yhdistämistä laivanrakennuksen innovaatioiden johtamiseen. Kuvaaja: Mikko Lehtimäki

A new dissertation has been made at the University of Vaasa, Finland that shows how sustainable development can efficiently be combined into company businesses. The dissertation gives company leaders practical tools for guiding and managing the processes.   Combining sustainability into business is often felt as a challenge, if not even impossible. Environmental aspects and social responsibility are seen as opposite requirements compared to financial targets of a company

Rapp Marine to Equip New OSU Research Vessel

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Rapp Marine said it has been selected by Gulf Island Shipyard, LLC, as the Overboard Handling System Single Source Vendor (OHS SSV) for Oregon State University’s (OSU) 193 ft x 41 ft multi-mission Regional Class Research Vessel (RCRV), with the option of two additional vessels. Funding for the RCRV project is provided by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the contract design of the RCRV was developed by Glosten

Charting the Next 100 Years of Naval Station Norfolk

What does the future hold for Naval Station Norfolk, the world’s largest naval station?    Building on the accomplishments of the last 100 years, leading experts will consider the possibilities and navigate toward a secure and sustainable future at the upcoming symposium, Naval Station Norfolk: Charting Our Next 100 Years, Friday October 20th at the Main, hotel and conference center.  Panel topics include: Future Fleet Design Research and Technology

Arctic Research Explores the ‘Roomba’ Approach

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The pace and quality of oil spill research in the United States typically ebbs and flows as a function of two, if not three important variables. First, after the 1989 Exxon Valdez grounding, there was a flurry of activity to ramp up oil spill research because it had been dormant for so long. The need was recognized, with plenty of money made available. Primarily, this research centered on conventional spill remediation techniques – for example

Duke Receives Funding for New Research Vessel

 Duke University said it has received $11 million for the construction and operation of a new state-of-the-art vessel that will expand teaching and research capabilities at its marine lab.   The gift to the Nicholas School of the Environment from the Grainger Family Descendants Fund, a donor-advised fund at The Chicago Community Trust, provides $5 million to build the new 68-foot oceangoing research vessel and an additional $6 million to support operating costs.  

'Team Damen' Unites Dutch and Australian Industry

Artist’s impression of the Damen 1800 OPV  (Photo: Damen)

Australian Maritime Systems Group is entering into a joint venture with one of Europe’s leading marine technology companies as part of a tender for Australia’s next giant defence contract.   The Brisbane-based company is partnering with Dutch firm Alewijnse Marine to support the Damen Group’s bid to build the next generation of 12 Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) for the Royal Australian Navy. The vessels will be mainly constructed in Adelaide and Perth

Oil Spill Response: USCG Testing Evolves

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Coast Guard R&D Center’s JMTF is a big part of the nation’s environmental research efforts.   In 1972, the U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RDC) established the Fire and Safety Test Detachment (FSTD), which later became the Joint Maritime Test Facility (JMTF), at Coast Guard Sector Mobile in Mobile, Alabama. As part of the unit’s establishment, test facilities were also built on nearby Little Sand Island in Mobile Bay

Predicting the Motion of the Ocean

(Photo: General Dynamics Applied Physical Sciences / U.S. Navy)

For thousands of years sailors have looked out to sea, anticipating the motion of their craft from the waves they see coming. The nature of this constant motion, phasing in and out with the groups of waves, influences the safety of operations, from moving about the deck or rigging to transferring people and materials between craft. Waves and the resulting motions are a key factor in deciding whether to perform an operation

Undersea Technology: A Strategic Rhode Island Advantage

Molly Donohue Magee

In 1869, the U.S. Navy’s first research facility—the Naval Torpedo Station—was built on Newport, Rhode Island’s Goat Island. This rich history continues today, as the state is home to the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, which provides the technical foundation to ensure the U.S. Navy’s undersea superiority. Fitting for “the Ocean State,” we have identified more than 170 Rhode Island organizations that touch undersea technology—and we believe that

USS Indianapolis Wreckage Located

Photo: United States Navy

 A team of civilian researchers led by entrepreneur and philanthropist Paul G. Allen have found the wreck of the World War II cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA 35), which was lost July 30, 1945.   This is a significant discovery considering the depth of the water in which the ship was lost - more than 18,000 feet. Around 800 of the ship's 1,196 Sailors and Marines survived the sinking, but after four to five days in the water - suffering exposure, dehydration

US Navy Buoys into the Arctic Ocean

An Air-Deployable Expendable Ice Buoy is deployed in the high Arctic near the North Pole from a Royal Danish Air Force C-130 aircraft operating out of Thule Air Force Base in Greenland, as part of the International Arctic Buoy Program (IABP). Photo: United States Navy

 The U.S National Ice Center (USNIC) in coordination with the Office of Naval Research, Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy, the Danish Joint Arctic Command, Environmental and Climate Change Canada and University of Washington deployed buoys into the Arctic Ocean during a joint mission.  The joint mission was conducted to collect weather and oceanographic data to enhance forecasting and environmental models thereby reducing operational risk for assets in the Arctic.  

Man Medevaced from Chinese Research Vessel near Alaska

U.S. Coast Guard photo

 Man Medevaced from Chinese Research Vessel near Alaska   A man with a broken arm was medevaced from the Chinese research vessel Xue Long, 15 nautical miles from Nome, Alaska, Saturday morning.   A smallboat crew from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley embarked the man and transferred him to the Alex Haley for further transfer to Nome.   Coast Guard District 17 command center watchstanders received a relay notification from a Coast Guard liaison to China who

ClassNK Lays Out R&D Roadmap

Classification society ClassNK has mapped out the details of its vision and goals for research and development projects over the next five years.   ClassNK’s R&D Roadmap outlines the two activities as the foundation of its R&D, and details investigations and research associated with core technologies which will also contribute to the development of human resources for contributing maritime technology and engineering as a classification society and utilization of damage

Another Milestone for RRS Sir David Attenborough Build

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce is marking another milestone on the journey toward the completion of Britain’s new polar research vessel the RRS Sir David Attenborough being built by Merseyside shipyard Cammell Laird.   The last of the vessel’s Bergen B33:45 engines/gensets have been craned into the ship’s hull at Cammell Laird ready to be connected to the RRS Sir David Attenborough’s Rolls-Royce propulsion system.  

Noise Control Engineering Awarded Navy SBIR Grant

Computational fluid dynamic consideration of nozzle design (Image: Noise Control Engineering)

Noise Control Engineering awarded Navy SBIR grant for abrasive blaster with reduced noise Glosten subsidiary Noise Control Engineering, LLC said it has been awarded a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract to apply advance aeroacoustics principals to the design of an abrasive blasting nozzle, reducing noise from the nozzle while simultaneously improving the device’s productivity. According to Noise Control Engineering

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2017 - The Marine Design Annual

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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