Marine Link
Friday, October 20, 2017

Uss Cole

Following Wake of Terrorist Attacks, USS Cole is Relaunched

Shortly following terrorist attakcs in both New York and Washington, D.C., USS Cole, the destroyer, which was itself the victim of a terrorist attack, was relaunched back into the water on September 14 at Northrop Grumman Corporation. The ship was launched a day earlier than previously scheduled at the company's Ingalls Operations. The ship had been moved onto land in January into a construction bay near where Cole was originally built by Northrop Grumman. The USS Cole crippled in a terrorist attack in the Port of Aden, Yemen, on Oct. 12, 2000, returned to its construction shipyard on the deck of the Norwegian heavy lift ship Blue Marlin last December. Capt. Philip N. Johnson, USN, supervisor of Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, said that work to date aboard the USS Cole has consisted of more than 550 tons of steel structural repairs to replace the damaged area's exterior plating. He added that the relaunching of Cole represents completion of all structural repairs and restoration. Other completed work includes the replacement of damaged and unserviceable equipment, and removal, evaluation and recertification of critical systems such as shafting and propellers. The repair process is moving along as scheduled. Following the relaunch, work will be completed on component system assemblies, alignment of machinery, energizing, testing and alignment of all systems, and completion of logistics and supply support outfitting

U.S. Warships Avoiding Suez Canal After Cole Blast

U.S. military vessels have not been using the Suez Canal since the alleged suicide attack on the USS Cole on Oct. 12, but U.S. and Egyptian officials are working very closely on security arrangements for the vital waterway, a military spokesman said. A spokesman for the U.S. Central Command emphasized the importance of the Suez Canal, which connects the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea, to U.S. military and commercial traffic and said Egypt took the waterway's security very seriously

Canadian Navy Puts Out Tenders for Floating Barrier

The Canadian navy is moving ahead with plans to build a floating fence around its dockyards in Halifax, according to a CBC News report. Currently, there is no physical barrier stopping any boat from targeting the navy's 22 major warships in Halifax and Esquimalt on the West Coast. The navy hopes a two-meter-high barrier will prevent attacks like the one in Yemen in 2000, when a small boat loaded with explosives rammed into the American warship USS Cole

US Navy Takes Cole Commander off Promotion List

The officer who commanded the USS Cole when it was attacked in Yemen in 2000 will not be promoted because he did not meet the standards expected of commanding officers, the U.S. Navy said on Monday. Almost six years after the al Qaeda attack that killed 17 sailors while the American destroyer was refueling, Navy Secretary Donald Winter pulled Cmdr. Kirk Lippold off a promotion list, saying he was not qualified to rise to the rank of captain, the Navy said in a statement.

US Navy Calls off Search for Missing Sailor

Official U.S. Navy file photo

U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard assets ended the search April 12 for a missing sailor assigned to USS Carter Hall (LSD 50). The sailor was reported missing April 9 while the ship was conducting routine training operations in support of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group Composite Training Unit Exercise, approximately 60 nautical miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C. The Navy immediately initiated search and rescue operations

US Navy Destroyer to Patrol off Yemen amid Iran Tensions

The United States has sent a Navy destroyer to patrol off the coast of Yemen to protect waterways from Houthi militia aligned with Iran, two U.S. officials told Reuters on Friday, amid heightened tension between Washington and Tehran.   The USS Cole arrived in the vicinity of the Bab al-Mandab Strait off southwestern Yemen where it will carry out patrols, including escorting vessels, the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity.  

Training & Education: Blue Ridge Officers Complete Safety Training

The U.S. Navy's Seventh Fleet command ship, USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19), is outfitted with the latest command, control, and communications technology in order to effectively command naval units defending the national interests of the United States. This highly visible ship, which operates routinely in the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean, and waters adjacent to areas involved in the War on Terrorism, visits many foreign ports, conducting military and diplomatic engagements with U.S

Cruise Lines Turn to LRAD

BBC reported that the crew of the Seabourn Spirit quickly changed course and headed out into open water to evade the attackers in small boats who had raked the vessel with rockets and automatic weapons fire. They also deployed a military-grade sonic weapon. The long range acoustic device, or LRAD, is a high-tech loudhailer capable of causing permanent damage to hearing from a distance of more than 984 ft. Commissioned and designed after the al-Qaeda attack on the USS Cole in Yemen in

Vice Admiral Nanos Retires

Vice Adm. Pete Nanos, Commander of Naval Sea Systems Command and the Navy's senior engineering duty officer, retired June 26 in a ceremony at the Washington Navy Yard after 35 years of service. Nanos, a native of Bedford, N.H., has commanded NAVSEA since May 1998. Under his leadership, instituted far-reaching quality initiatives that transformed NAVSEA into a unified corporation that provides world-class technical, acquisition, and life-cycle support leadership to the Navy.

USS Sterett Commissioned in Special Ceremony

A crew member of the newly commissioned guided missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104) stands at parade rest after being given the order to man the ship and bring her to life by the ship sponsor Michelle Sterett-Bernson. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin S. OBrien/Released)

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Patrick Grieco The U.S. Navy's commissioned the latest guided-missile destroyer USS Sterett (DDG 104) at 's Locust Point Cruise terminals Aug. 9 - the fourth time in naval history that a ship bears this name. The ship can now directly support the Navy's effort to execute the maritime strategy. During the ceremony, Greg Sterett, a descendant of the ship's namesake Lt. Andrew Sterett, was dressed in a colonial naval uniform

US Navy Temporarily Relieves Commander of Stricken Warship

(U.S. Navy photo by Peter Burghart)

The U.S. Navy on Tuesday said on Tuesday it has temporarily relieved, for medical reasons, the commander of a warship involved in a crash with a container vessel in Japanese waters that killed seven American sailors. The collision between the guided missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald and the Philippine-registered ACX Crystal on June 17 resulted in the greatest loss of life on a U.S. Navy vessel since the USS Cole was bombed by Islamist militants in Yemen's Aden harbour in 2000.

US to Haul Stricken Destroyer from Japan to US for Repairs

USS Fitzgerald collided with a freighter in Japanese waters on June 17 (U.S. Navy photo by Peter Burghart)

The U.S. Navy on Tuesday said it will haul the guided missile destroyer severely damaged in a collision with a freighter in Japanese waters back to the United States for repairs as soon as September.   The collision killed seven sailors aboard the USS Fitzgerald and ripped a hole below the vessels waterline. Naval engineers in Japan have patched up the destroyer but extensive damage that nearly sank the warship means it is unable to sail under its own steam.  

U.S. Navy Punishes Senior Staff in Deadly Warship Collision

File Image of the USS Fitzgerald

Commanders of U.S. warship removed after cargo ship collision; seven sailors killed in June collision.   The U.S. Navy has removed the two senior officers and the senior enlisted sailor on a U.S. warship that almost sank off the coast of Japan in June after it was struck by a Philippine container ship, the Navy said on Friday.   Multiple investigations have yet to apportion blame for the accident that killed seven U.S. sailors aboard the guided missile destroyer the USS Fitzgerald

Ingalls to Repair USS Fitzgerald

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) was damaged in a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan (U. S. Navy photo by Peter Burghart)

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) said its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has been selected to repair the guided missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) when it returns to the U.S.   The ship, which suffered heavy damage and nearly sank off the coast of Japan after a fatal collision with a Philippine containership on June 17, will be brought to Ingalls’ facilities in Pascagoula, Miss. for the repairs.  

Cole Quits Beach Energy

Robert J. Cole, Managing Director

  Beach Energy Ltd announced today that Robert Cole resigned as Managing Director of the company. Mr Cole will remain with Beach until 14 October 2015 to allow for an orderly transition. As announced on 19 August 2015 Mr Cole has been on leave to attend to family matters in Perth. As a result of those matters, Mr Cole has decided it is not possible to return to a full time executive role with Beach in Adelaide. He has accordingly resigned.

Cole Appointed Beach Energy's Non-Executive Director

Robert Cole

  Beach Energy Limited announced that Mr Robert Cole will, on cessation of his employment with Beach on 14 October 2015, continue as a non-executive director of the company. Mr Cole will nominate for re-election as a non-executive director at the 2015 annual general meeting. Beach chairman, Mr Davis, said, “Whilst Rob Cole is unable to return to Adelaide to discharge a full time executive function for us he has agreed to continue in a role as a non-executive director

This Day In Naval History: April 25

The crew of the guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103) mans the rails after bringing the ship to life at the ships commissioning ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Rebekah Blowers)

1862 - Union Flag Officer David G. Farraguts fleet sails into New Orleans, La., after long preparation and fierce battles while passing through the Confederate defenses of Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip the previous day.   1914 - In the first use of U.S. Navy aircraft in a combat situation, Lt. j.g. P.N.L. Bellinger made a flight from USS Mississippis aviation unit at Vera Cruz, Mexico, to observe the city and make preliminary search for mines in the harbor.  

This Day In Naval History - May 24

1917 - The first U.S. convoy left Hampton Roads, Va. to cross the North Atlantic after entering World War I. During the 18 months of war while American vessels escort convoys through the war zone, 183 attacks are made by submarines, 24 submarines are damaged and two are destroyed.   1918 - USS Olympia (C 6) is anchored at Kola Inlet, Murmansk, Russia, to protect refugees during the Russian Revolution.   1939 - Vice Adm

This Day In Naval History: June 8

USS Cole (DDG 67) (U.S. Navy photo by Christopher L. Clark)

1830 - The sloop of war USS Vincennes becomes the first US Navy warship to circle the globe when she returns to New York. She departs on Sept. 3, 1826, rounds Cape Horn and cruises the Pacific protecting American merchantmen and whalers until June 1829. 1880 - Congress authorizes the Office of Judge Advocate General. Vice Adm. Nanette M. Derenzi currently serves as the 42nd Judge Advocate General of the Navy. 1937 - Capt. Julius F

Fundraiser Held for USS Gerald R. Ford Crew

Photo: Blackmer

Blackmer, a company in positive displacement and centrifugal pump and reciprocating compressor technologies, has a relationship with the U.S. Military that dates back to 1914 when it became an official equipment supplier to the Armed Forces.   One of the more significant contracts Blackmer has earned was awarded in 2007 when the U.S. Navy selected the company to supply sliding vane pumps for use on the USS Gerald R

US Navy: Bigger is Better, but at What Cost?

U.S. Navy forces and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force routinely train together to improve interoperability and readiness to provide stability and security for the Indo-Asia Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Z.A. Landers)

The U.S. Navy has a balanced fleet, but it wants to grow bigger and better. Will the budget allow both?   Maritime Reporter's March 2017 cover story on the U.S. Navy was all about the numbers. There exists several plans to grow the fleet beyond the current number of 308 ships, the Mitre recommendation of 414 ships, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment 340-ship proposal, and the Navy’s decision to grow the fleet to 355 ships, and the Trump administration’s 350.

An Hour Passed before Japan Authorities were Notified of Fitzgerald Collision

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. (U.S. Navy photo by Peter Burghart)

Nearly an hour elapsed before a Philippine-flagged container ship reported a collision with a U.S. warship, the Japanese coastguard said on Monday, as investigations began into the accident in which seven U.S. sailors were killed.   The U.S. Navy confirmed that all seven missing sailors on the USS Fitzgerald were found dead in flooded berthing compartments after the destroyer's collision with the container ship off Japan early on Saturday.  

USCG Interviews Containership Crew after Warship Collision

The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, June 17, 2017. (U.S. Navy photo by Peter Burghart)

The United States Coast Guard will on Tuesday start interviewing the crew of a Philippines-flagged container ship which collided with a U.S. warship in Japanese waters killing seven American sailors.   The U.S. coast guard investigation is one several into the incident on Saturday involving the guided missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald and the much larger ACX Crystal. The cause of the collision at night and in clear weather is not known.  

US Warship Stayed on Collision Course despite Warning

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. (U.S. Navy photo by Peter Burghart)

A U.S. warship struck by a container vessel in Japanese waters failed to respond to warning signals or take evasive action before a collision that killed seven of its crew, according to a report of the incident by the Philippine cargo ship's captain.   Multiple U.S. and Japanese investigations are under way into how the guided missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald and the much larger ACX Crystal container ship collided in clear weather south of Tokyo Bay in the early hours of June 17.

Japan Investigators Unlikely to be Granted Access to Fitzgerald Crew

The USS Fitzgerald is shown being assisted back to port after a deadly collision (CREDIT: USN / K Weierman

The United States will likely bar Japanese investigators from interviewing USS Fitzgerald crew manning the guided missile destroyer when it was struck by a cargo ship in Japanese waters killing seven American sailors, a U.S. navy official said.   The Philippines-flagged container ship ACX Crystal and the U.S. warship collided at night just south of Tokyo Bay on June 17. The U.S. deaths were the greatest loss of life on a U.S

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2017 - The Marine Design Annual

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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