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Tuesday, December 11, 2018

USS Michael Monsoor Christened

Maritime Activity Reports, Inc.

June 20, 2016

  • Sally Monsoor christens the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), which is named in honor of her son, Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works)
  • Sally Monsoor, sponsor of the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), holds the christening bottle alongside the ship's commanding officer, Capt. Scott Smith; her matrons of honor; and Fred Harris, president of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works)
  • The future guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) completed the successful lift and integration of the deckhouse on to the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard in November 2014. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works)
  • Sally Monsoor christens the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), which is named in honor of her son, Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works) Sally Monsoor christens the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), which is named in honor of her son, Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works)
  • Sally Monsoor, sponsor of the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), holds the christening bottle alongside the ship's commanding officer, Capt. Scott Smith; her matrons of honor; and Fred Harris, president of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works) Sally Monsoor, sponsor of the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), holds the christening bottle alongside the ship's commanding officer, Capt. Scott Smith; her matrons of honor; and Fred Harris, president of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works)
  • The future guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) completed the successful lift and integration of the deckhouse on to the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard in November 2014. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works) The future guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) completed the successful lift and integration of the deckhouse on to the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard in November 2014. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works)

The U.S. Navy’s newest guided-missile destroyer, Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), was christened on Saturday, June 18 at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine.

 
The second ship of the Zumwalt-class, DDG 1001 is named for Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Monsoor, who was deployed to Iraq in Operation Iraqi Freedom and was killed Sept. 29, 2006, in Ar Ramadi, Iraq. Sally Monsoor, Petty Officer Monsoor’s mother, the ship's sponsor, officially christened the ship by breaking a bottle of champagne against the ship’s bow.
 
Featured speakers at the Saturday morning christening ceremony included the Hon. Janine Davidson, Under Secretary of the Navy, and retired Vice Adm. Joseph Maguire, president and chief executive officer of the Special Operations Warrior Foundation. 
 
Fred Harris, president of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, said “We all understand the importance of what we do – building ships that will protect our sailors and marines, providing them the best possible tools to do their jobs safely. We are proud to build ships that serve our nation and honor the sacrifices of American heroes like Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Monsoor.”
 
The Michael Monsoor is 610 feet long, with a displacement of approximately 15,000 tons when fully loaded.
 
The keel for DDG 1001 was laid on May 23, 2013.
 
Guided-missile destroyers are multi-mission surface combatants capable of conducting Anti-Air Warfare (AAW), Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), and Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW). Destroyers can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups, amphibious ready groups, and underway replenishment groups.
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