Marine Link
Friday, July 20, 2018

Djibouti Provides ​​Port Security Training

Maritime Activity Reports, Inc.

March 26, 2018

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

 Ports provide the critical interface between the ship and the shore. For maritime trade to flow effectively, this vital infrastructure needs to be secure – and this involves people at all levels. 

 
A national maritime security training workshop in Djibouti (19-23 March) included practical exercises and a site visit to a nearby port facility as well as class-based training in how to implement the relevant provisions of International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s code on International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code) and SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and related guidance. 
 
The workshop was held at the Djibouti Regional Maritime Training Centre, Djibouti, and was aimed at port facility security officers and other port security personnel. 
 
In addition, designated maritime security officials from the Djiboutian Maritime Authority were involved in the training, to gain insight into their oversight roles and responsibilities.
 
The training was organized by IMO at the request of the Djiboutian Maritime Authority and was conducted by IMO’s Kiruja Micheni and a team of consultants. 
 
Having entered into force under SOLAS chapter XI-2, on 1 July 2004, the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) has since formed the basis for a comprehensive mandatory security regime for international shipping. The Code is divided into two sections, Part A and Part B.
 
Mandatory Part A outlines detailed maritime and port security-related requirements which SOLAS contracting governments, port authorities and shipping companies must adhere to, in order to be in compliance with the Code. Part B of the Code provides a series of recommendatory guidelines on how to meet the requirements and obligations set out within the provisions of Part A.
 
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