Marine Link
Monday, June 26, 2017

Greenland Builds New Research Vessel

February 17, 2015

  • Photo courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
  • Image courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
  • Image courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
  • Photo courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
  • Photo courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources Photo courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
  • Image courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources Image courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
  • Image courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources Image courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
  • Photo courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources Photo courtesy of Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
Greenland has an intense interest in maritime research and survey for the near coastal waters, thanks in part to a growing seafood sector, an extensive coastline and some 250 different species of fish. To meet the nation’s emerging need, Greenland had a fine 32.3-meter research vessel built at the Karstensen’s Shipyard in Skagen, Denmark. The vessel was named  R/V Sanna by Helle Siegstad, Head of the Department of Fish and Shellfish, in a ceremony at Nuuk, Greenland in April of 2012.
 
The R/V Sanna then went into service with the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources researching the Greenland halibut, crab, and cod stocks in Greenland’s coastal waters and ice fjords. A larger vessel, the 1971-built stern trawler Pâmiut serves primarily to research shrimp and Greenland halibut in more open waters. The R/V Sanna, with a 10-meter beam and depth from main deck of 4.88 meters, is, under the command of Captain Rink Heinrich, capable of a wide range of research. The vessel is equipped for trawling, gillnets, long lines and pot fishing. Researchers have two wet and one dry laboratory with fume-hood, a chemical laboratory, cold and freezer laboratory and a -80 Celsius freezer.
 
Designed by OSK-Shiptech in collaboration with the scientists from Greenland, the ship has accommodation for 16 people in a total of nine cabins. A Cummins K38-M Tier 2 engine rated for 1000 HP at 1800 RPM, turning a variable-pitch Hundested propeller, provides main propulsion. Given the northern climate and long winters, the R/V Sanna works the west coast of Greenland only six months of the year. Between her launch and February 2015 she has put 7371 hours on her Cummins main without any problems. To meet the extensive electronic needs of multiple winches, bow thruster as well as laboratories and navigational equipment the R/V Sanna has a pair of Cummins QSM11D-powered generators to provide 220 kW of power. Given her quality build and strong service support by the Esbjerg branch of Granly Diesel A/S the research vessel can be expected to continue and an important asset to arctic fisheries research for many years to come.
 
 
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