Marine Link
Tuesday, December 11, 2018

World’s Most High-tech Ship Enters Service

Maritime Activity Reports, Inc.

November 2, 2016

  • USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) passes under the Gov. William Preston Lane Memorial Bridge, also known as the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, as the ship travels to its new home port of San Diego (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)
  • Guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt transits the Atlantic Ocean to conduct acceptance trials with the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). (U.S. Navy photo)
  • Capt. James A. Kirk, commanding officer of the future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt , speaks to crew and guests in the hangar bay as part of the ship's turnover ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Roger S. Duncan)
  • An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21 flies near the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) as the ship travels to its new home port of San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)
  • Adm. Phil Davidson, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, greets Sailors assigned to future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) at Naval Station Norfolk. (U.S. Navy Photo by Matthew Bash)
  • USS Zumwalt departing Bath Iron Works. Crewed by 147 Sailors, Zumwalt is the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power. (U.S. Navy photo)
  • The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departs from Naval Station Newport, R.I. following its maiden voyage from Bath Iron Works Shipyard in Bath, Maine. (U.S. Navy photo by Haley Nace)
  • USS Zumwalt departs the Bath Iron Works shipyard for its second at-sea period to conduct builder's trials, during which many of the ship's key systems and technologies were demonstrated. (U.S. Navy photo)
  • USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) passes under the Gov. William Preston Lane Memorial Bridge, also known as the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, as the ship travels to its new home port of San Diego (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter) USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) passes under the Gov. William Preston Lane Memorial Bridge, also known as the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, as the ship travels to its new home port of San Diego (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)
  • Guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt transits the Atlantic Ocean to conduct acceptance trials with the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). (U.S. Navy photo) Guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt transits the Atlantic Ocean to conduct acceptance trials with the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). (U.S. Navy photo)
  • Capt. James A. Kirk, commanding officer of the future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt , speaks to crew and guests in the hangar bay as part of the ship's turnover ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Roger S. Duncan) Capt. James A. Kirk, commanding officer of the future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt , speaks to crew and guests in the hangar bay as part of the ship's turnover ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Roger S. Duncan)
  • An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21 flies near the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) as the ship travels to its new home port of San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter) An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21 flies near the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) as the ship travels to its new home port of San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)
  • Adm. Phil Davidson, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, greets Sailors assigned to future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) at Naval Station Norfolk. (U.S. Navy Photo by Matthew Bash) Adm. Phil Davidson, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, greets Sailors assigned to future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) at Naval Station Norfolk. (U.S. Navy Photo by Matthew Bash)
  • USS Zumwalt departing Bath Iron Works. Crewed by 147 Sailors, Zumwalt is the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power. (U.S. Navy photo) USS Zumwalt departing Bath Iron Works. Crewed by 147 Sailors, Zumwalt is the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power. (U.S. Navy photo)
  • The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departs from Naval Station Newport, R.I. following its maiden voyage from Bath Iron Works Shipyard in Bath, Maine. (U.S. Navy photo by Haley Nace) The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departs from Naval Station Newport, R.I. following its maiden voyage from Bath Iron Works Shipyard in Bath, Maine. (U.S. Navy photo by Haley Nace)
  • USS Zumwalt departs the Bath Iron Works shipyard for its second at-sea period to conduct builder's trials, during which many of the ship's key systems and technologies were demonstrated. (U.S. Navy photo) USS Zumwalt departs the Bath Iron Works shipyard for its second at-sea period to conduct builder's trials, during which many of the ship's key systems and technologies were demonstrated. (U.S. Navy photo)

USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), representing the newest class of surface combatant, was commissioned on October 15 in ceremonies at Baltimore.

 
Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus was the principal speaker. “This ship is an example of a larger initiative to increase operational stability and give the U.S. a strategic advantage,” he said. 
 
“Our Navy and our Marine Corps, uniquely, provide presence – around the globe, around the clock – ensuring stability, reassuring allies, deterring adversaries and providing the nation's leaders with options in times of crisis,” Mabus said.
 
The ship is named for former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., the youngest CNO ever, and remembered for instituting many changes to the Navy, often promulgating new polices with his famous “Z-Gram” messages.
 
As a junior officer, Mabus said he witnessed as Zumwalt transformed the Navy “one Z-gram at a time... removing demeaning and abrasive regulations and moving to eliminate the scourge of racism and sexism from within our Navy.” He added, “Among many initiatives, he opened flight training to women and increased recruiting of under-represented Americans. And, as has always been the case when we open opportunities in our Navy and Marine Corps, we got stronger.”
 
U.S. Pacific Command Commander Adm. Harry Harris said he was looking forward to having Zumwalt and her unique capability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region
 
“We can’t get enough of this technological marvel to the Pacific fast enough, and it couldn’t come at a more pivotal moment in our nation’s history,” Harris said. “I have big plans for USS Zumwalt and her two sister ships.”
 
“I’m no Bruce Wayne, but like Batman’s alter-ego, I’ve been accused of having an insatiable appetite for cutting-edge technology to fight the forces of darkness in my neighborhood. If Batman had a ship, it would be the USS Zumwalt,” Harris said.
 
“We must continue to develop and field combat power like this ship to defend the U.S. homeland and the homelands of our allies,” Harris said.
 
Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Richardson said the event was a celebration of the ship, the crew, and the namesake, Adm. Zumwalt.
 
Commander Naval Surface Forces Vice Adm. Tom Rowden, accepted ownership of the ship, which he called the “most incredible ship of our time.”
 
“Today we welcome this revolutionary warship to the fleet—a ship that demonstrates daring design and cutting-edge capability,” Rowden said. “This ship symbolizes our commitment to remain bold, to remain the world’s preeminent naval force.”
 
Rowden said the ship will also commemorate the legacy of one of the Navy’s great leaders. 
 
“To say the Navy was transformed by Admiral Zumwalt is an understatement. Indeed, every leader on this stage and the great crew standing before us has benefited from Bud Zumwalt's passion to make the Navy even better,” Rowden said.
 
“Today's ceremony marked the culmination of over three years of dedication and hard work by some of the finest Sailors I have had the pleasure to lead,” said Capt. James A. Kirk, commanding officer of Zumwalt. “The only thing more impressive than the capabilities of the ship are the capabilities of its fine crew.”
 
Platform speakers also included Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, (D-MD) and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. 
 
The ship's co-sponsors, Ann Zumwalt and Mouzetta Zumwalt-Weathers, daughters of Adm. Zumwalt, gave the order to “man our ship and bring her to life.”
 
The ceremony took place on a beautiful autumn day during Baltimore’s “Fleet Week,” and the attendees enjoyed the Blue Angels performance before the late-afternoon commissioning.
Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Nov 2018 - Workboat Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

Subscribe
Maritime Reporter E-News subscription

Maritime Reporter E-News is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for Maritime Reporter E-News