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Friday, January 19, 2018

Amphibious Force Seventh News

USS Wasp Joins 7th Fleet

Photo: United States Navy

The amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) entered U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations Jan. 6 after completing nearly two months of disaster relief efforts in the Caribbean Sea. Wasp departed Norfolk Aug. 30 to replace USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) in Sasebo, Japan as the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship in region. While still in the initial phase of its transit, the ship diverted to the Caribbean on Sept. 4 to assist the U.S. Virgin Islands and Dominica in the wake of Hurricane Irma and then provided assistance to Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria…

"Iron Nickel's" Last Voyage

The amphibious assault ship USS Peleliu (LHA 5) returns to San Diego following the completion of its final deployment to the Western Pacific region. Peleliu completed Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014 and conducted

USS Peleliu (LHA 5) returned to Naval Base San Diego Dec. 24 from a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific. Upon return, the ship will make preparations to decommission in March after 34 years of service, 17 deployments and more than a million miles transited, and as the last remaining Tarawa-class amphibious assault ship. During the ship's deployment Peleliu, its crew, Commander, Amphibious Squadron Three, Special Purpose Marine Task Force Three and Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 21 participated in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014 as part of U.S. 3rd Fleet.

U.S. Support to ROK Salvage Ops Leadership Change

Commander, Amphibious Force Seventh Fleet, Rear Adm. Rich Landolt, has assumed the duties as the senior naval officer in charge of U.S. Navy assistance to the Republic of Korea (ROK) in their salvage efforts for the ROKS Cheonan Apr. Landolt has been on-site for several days to assess the situation and acclimate his staff to the mission. Additionally, he has met with the ROK lead for the salvage efforts, Vice Adm. Kim Sung-Chan, and his staff aboard ROKS Dokdo several times to coordinate future plans. His ship, USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49), will serve as the U.S. Afloat Staging Base for this operation and he has brought with him portions of his staff and portions of Amphibious Squadron 11, commanded by Commodore Mark Weber. Landolt will command of all U.S.

This Day in Naval History – Oct. 26

1921 - In first successful test, a compressed air, turntable catapult, launches an N-9 seaplane. 1922 - LCDR Godfrey deC. Chevalier makes first landing aboard a carrier (USS Langley) while underway off Cape Henry, Virginia. 1942 - Battle of the Santa Cruz Island. USS Hornet (CV-8) was lost and USS Enterprise (CV-6) was badly damaged during the battle. 1944 - Battle of Leyte Gulf ends with Navy carrier and USAAF aircraft attacks on the retreating Japanese ships. U.S. forces sink many Japanese ships including 4 carriers, 3 battleships, 10 cruisers, and 9 destroyers, for a total of 26 capital ships. Afterwards Japanese fleet ceases to exist as an organized fighting fleet.

This Day in Navy History

October 26, 1921 - In first successful test, a compressed air, turntable catapult, launches an N-9 seaplane. 1922 - LCDR Godfrey deC. Chevalier makes first landing aboard a carrier (USS Langley) while underway off Cape Henry, Virginia. 1942 - Battle of the Santa Cruz Island. USS Hornet (CV-8) was lost and USS Enterprise (CV-6) was badly damaged during the battle. 1944 - Battle of Leyte Gulf ends with Navy carrier and USAAF aircraft attacks on the retreating Japanese ships. U.S. forces sink many Japanese ships including 4 carriers, 3 battleships, 10 cruisers, and 9 destroyers, for a total of 26 capital ships. Afterwards Japanese fleet ceases to exist as an organized fighting fleet.

This Day in U.S. Naval History – October 26

1921 - In first successful test, a compressed air, turntable catapult, launches an N-9 seaplane. 1922 - LCDR Godfrey deC. Chevalier makes first landing aboard a carrier (USS Langley) while underway off Cape Henry, Virginia. 1942 - Battle of the Santa Cruz Island. USS Hornet (CV-8) was lost and USS Enterprise (CV-6) was badly damaged during the battle. 1944 - Battle of Leyte Gulf ends with Navy carrier and USAAF aircraft attacks on the retreating Japanese ships. U.S. forces sink many Japanese ships including 4 carriers, 3 battleships, 10 cruisers, and 9 destroyers, for a total of 26 capital ships. Afterwards Japanese fleet ceases to exist as an organized fighting fleet.

US Navy Divers Support ROK Ship Recovery

Photo courtesy U.S. Navy

Sailors of Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 1, based out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5 Platoon 501 based out of Sasebo, Japan, are diving in the Yellow Sea in support of the recovery and salvage of the Republic of Korea Ship (ROK) Cheonan. "We're here to offer all the help we can. We're ready to step in anytime and dive or assist hands-on in any way we can," said Navy Diver 3rd Class Andrew Kornelsen, a Madison, Wis., native.

This Day in Naval History – Dec. 26

1862 - Four nuns who were volunteer nurses on board Red Rover were the first female nurses on a U.S. Navy hospital ship. 1943 - Seventh Amphibious Force lands 1st Marine Division on Cape Gloucester, New Britain. (Source: Navy News Service)

Today in U.S. Naval History: December 26

Today in U.S. Naval History - December 26 1862 - Four nuns who were volunteer nurses on board Red Rover were the first female nurses on a U.S. Navy hospital ship. 1943 - Seventh Amphibious Force lands 1st Marine Division on Cape Gloucester, New Britain. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

Today in U.S. Naval History: July 2

Today in U.S. 1923 - Commissioning of Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 1926 - Distinguished Flying Cross authorized by Congress. 1937 - Amelia Earhart disappears in Pacific. 1945 - USS Barb (SS-220) bombards Japanese installations on Kaihyo Island, Japan; first successful use of rockets against shore positions. 1946 - Establishment of VX-3 to evaluate adaptability of helicopters to naval purposes. 1950 - USS Juneau and 2 British ships sink five of six attacking North Korean torpedo boats and gunboats. 1967 - During Operation Bear Claw, Seventh Fleet Amphibious Force conducts helicopter assault 12 miles inland at Con Thien. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval Historical Center website at www.history.navy.mil.

Today in U.S. Naval History: July 2

USS Juneau (CL-119). U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Today in U.S. 1923 - Commissioning of Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 1926 - Distinguished Flying Cross authorized by Congress. 1937 - Amelia Earhart disappears in Pacific. 1945 - USS Barb (SS-220) bombards Japanese installations on Kaihyo Island, Japan; first successful use of rockets against shore positions. 1946 - Establishment of VX-3 to evaluate adaptability of helicopters to naval purposes. 1950 - USS Juneau and two British ships sink five of six attacking North Korean torpedo boats and gunboats.

Admiral Doran Now Leads Pacific Fleet

Adm. Walter F. Doran became the 30th commander in chief of the world's largest naval command May 4. "We have complete confidence in your ability and we know that you and your commanders and your staff are up to the task," said Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Vern Clark, who was guest speaker during the brief ceremony aboard the historic battleship Missouri moored along Battleship Row here. "Our nation is at war. Adm. Doran, a native of Albany, N.Y., now leads a fleet responsible for more than half the Earth's surface and comprises more than 180 ships, 1,400 aircraft and 232,500 Sailors, Marines and civilians. He took over from Adm. Thomas B. Fargo, who relinquished command of the Pacific Fleet to become commander in chief of the U.S. Pacific Command, headquartered at Camp H.M.

Future USS Anchorage (LPD 23) Launched

The future USS Anchorage (LPD 23) launched Feb. 12 from Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding's Avondale, La., shipyard, marking a key milestone in the ship's construction process. Due to extensive pre-outfitting efforts, Anchorage will be the most complete ship in the class at the time of launch. "We started construction on the first ship of the LPD 17 class 11 years ago." said Jay Stefany, LPD 17 program manager for the Navy's Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. Anchorage is the seventh ship of the San Antonio-class of landing platform docks and is named for the largest city in Alaska. The ship's sponsor is Annette Conway, wife of U.S. Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Conway. She will christen the ship this May in a traditional Navy ceremony.

US Navy Completes Korea Ferry SAR Mission

U.S. Navy photo by Christian Senyk

With concurrence from South Korean commanders, the U.S. Navy amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) is departing waters around Jindo, South Korea April 22 after assisting with search and rescue operations near the site of the Korean passenger ferry Sewol. The completion of Bonhomme Richard's search and rescue mission comes after South Korean military leaders determined that current resources were sufficient to carry out future search and rescue operations utilizing ships and aircraft from the Republic of Korea.

Australia Conducts Amphibious Task Group Drill

 Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment disembark a Landing Craft from HMAS Canberra during a major amphibious beach landing operation during Exercise Talisman Saber. Photo: Royal Australian Navy.

Australia’s amphibious capability was put to the test recently as the Amphibious Task Group Headquarters took charge of the largest amphibious assault conducted by an Australian force for 70 years as part of Exercise TALISMAN SABER. The assault, led from amphibious sssault ship HMAS Canberra, was a significant milestone in the Australian Defence Force’s development of a high end amphibious warfare capability. The Australian and New Zealand Amphibious Ready Group, consisting of HMA Ships Canberra and Choules and the Royal New Zealand Navy’s HMNZS Canterbury…

Amphibious Operations a Joint Effort

Royal Australian Navy

Staff from Brisbane-based 1st Division/Deployable Joint Force Headquarters joined other Defence representatives for an amphibious force staff exercise in Townsville in October. Conducted by the Amphibious Task Group, the exercise provided an opportunity for personnel representing the key enablers of Australia’s amphibious capability to discuss the future. Joining in were personnel from HMA Ships Canberra, Adelaide and Choules, Army's Forces Command and 3rd Brigade, Director General – Land, Maritime Operations, 5th Aviation Regiment and Combat Training Centre.

Australian Amphibious force Set for launch

Commander Amphibious Task Force, Captain Jay Bannister (left), Commander Deployable Joint Forces Headquarters, Major General Stuart Smith (middle) and Commanding Officer HMAS Canberra Captain Chris Smith walk onflight deck

Australia’s newest military capability, the Amphibious Ready Element, is preparing to demonstrate its capacity in waters off the North Queensland coast. Townsville-based 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment with MRH-90 helicopters from the 16th Aviation Brigade will combine with the Royal Australian Navy’s HMAS Canberra and Air Force assets to conduct a series of amphibious training activities from August through to October. Conducted by the Deployable Joint Force Headquarters under the command of Major General Stuart Smith…

Navy Repair Contracts Awarded

BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair, San Diego, California (N00024-16-D-4419); Continental Maritime of San Diego, San Diego, California (N00024-16-D-4420); and General Dynamics, National Steel and Shipbuilding Co., San Diego, California (N00024-16-D-4421), are being awarded firm-fixed price modifications to previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, multiple-award contracts to exercise option period two for the accomplishment of complex emergent and continuous maintenance and Chief of Naval Operations availabilities on amphibious ships (LPD, LSD, LHA and LHD) homeported in San Diego, California. The exercising of these options ensures continued facilities and human resources capable of completing complex emergent and continuous maintenance…

ADF’s New Amphibious Capability Demonstrated

One of HMAS Canberra’s Landing Craft transfers Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicles at the completion of security operations around Bramston Beach, North Queensland.

Australia’s newest military capability, the Amphibious Ready Element, has demonstrated its capacity in waters off the North Queensland coast during the Sea Series of exercises. Conducted by the Brisbane-based Deployable Joint Force Headquarters, under command of Major General Stuart Smith, the Sea Series of exercises enabled the amphibious force to achieve an interim operational capability. The Sea Series of exercises involved about 1100 embarked forces and crew on board HMAS Canberra with medium lift helicopters, landing craft and small boats, trucks, troop carriers and other vehicles.

USS Anchorage Maiden Voyage Panama Canal Transit

USS Anchorage in Panama Canal: Photo credit USN

Amphibious ship 'USS Anchorage' (LPD 23) transits the Panama Canal while in 4th Fleet's area of operations for the first time. USS Anchorage departed the Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) Shipbuilding site in Avondale, La. Oct. 30, 2012 to sail to her future homeport of San Diego. With a beam measuring 105 feet, Anchorage, a San Antonio-class LPD, is among the largest class of ships able to safely pass through the canal, whose locks measure 110 feet. She completed the transit in 13 hours.

U.S.-ROK Counterparts Leave Lasting Impressions

U.S. Sailors and Marines expressed heartfelt good-byes to their Republic of Korea (ROK) counterparts who disembarked ships of the Sasebo, Japan-based Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ESXARG) on April 1. The ARG-wide off-load came at the conclusion of Foal Eagle '07, the annual joint/combined exercise meant to improve interoperability and combat readiness between U.S. and ROK forces and build on the long-standing alliance between the United States and the Republic of Korea. The exercise culminated in a combined amphibious landing March 29, which was a testament to the two forces' interoperability in the Foal Eagle Amphibious Task Force (FE-ATF). The landing displayed the flexibility of the 7th Fleet's amphibious ships USS Essex (LHD 2), USS Tortuga (LSD 46) and USS Juneau (LPD 10).

RIMPAC Draws ADF Closer to Amphibious Future

HMAS Success maintains her assigned station on the Guide during the Fleet Formation serial, in which 38 warships and four submarines sailed in close company, testing the seamanship skills of bridge watchkeeping staff. The serial took 11 hours and resulted in an arial photograph of all the participating RIMPAC 14 ships and submarines.

More than 800 Australian Navy, Army and Air Force personnel are on their way home after taking part in RIMPAC, the world’s largest naval exercise, which concluded in Hawaii today. Australia sent the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) ship HMAS Success and Submarine HMAS Sheean, a rifle company from 5th Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment and three Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft to the exercise to conduct military training with defense forces from 21 other Pacific Rim nations.

Essex Amphibious Ready Group in S. China Sea

USS Essex (LHD 2) conducts maneuvers during normal operations Courtesy USN

The Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) transited the Straits of Malacca and conducted routine operations in the South China Sea as part of a deployment to the Western Pacific Nov. 7-10. The ARG's flagship, the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2), conducted the patrol as the amphibious transport dock USS Anchorage (LPD 23) and the amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47) prepared for bilateral training exercises with Brunei and Malaysia. On Nov. 10, Rushmore began offloading troops for the 2015 iteration of Malaysia-U.S.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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