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Sunday, January 21, 2018

Arctic Sea News

Operation to Liberate the MV Arctic Sea

According to Defence Minister Anatoly Serdyukov, eight people of Estonian, Latvian and Russian nationality were arrested during the operation to liberate the Arctic Sea. Investigations revealed that on July 24, 2009, these people boarded the Arctic Sea and using the threat of arms, demanded that the crew change course. Then the Arctic Sea sailed on to an African route indicated by the aggressors and turned off its navigation equipment. Serdyukov reported on the measures taken in accordance with the President's instructions concerning the disappearance of the Arctic Sea and the Russian crew on board. Earlier on during the meeting, Serdyukov reported to President Medvedev that the crew of the Arctic Sea has been released.

Arctic Sea Ice at Alrmingly Lower Level

Photo Credit: NASA/Operation Ice Bridge

Low Arctic sea ice extent for March caps a highly unusual winter in the Arctic, says the US National Snow and Ice Data Centre (NSIDC). In March, Arctic sea ice extent fell to its second lowest extent since 1981 — as did the overall Arctic sea ice extent for 2106. The decline of Arctic sea ice is already setting records in 2016, with the winter peak in March clocking in as the lowest since satellite records began, scientists say. Low Arctic sea ice extent for March caps a highly unusual winter in the Arctic, characterized by persistent warmth in the atmosphere that helped to limit ice growth.

HMM to Launch Arctic Sea Service

File Photo: Hyundai Merchant Marine

South Korea’s leading container carrier Hyundai Merchant Marine Co (HMM) is considering launching a regular liner service via the Arctic Sea, a move that could cut transits between Asia and Europe considerably, reported Pulse. South Korea’s largest ocean carrier is considering a trial operation from as early as 2020. A number of local logistics companies have ventured into the Arctic routes, but did not last due to lack of ships and crew expertise to navigate against the ice-packed waters.

Arctic Sea Ice Reaches Maximum Extent for 2014

A NASA Blue Marble view of Arctic sea ice on March 21, 2014.

NSIDC issued an update to Arctic Sea Ice News & Analysis describing winter sea ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean stating Arctic sea ice reached its maximum extent for the year on March 21 at 14.91 million square kilometers (5.76 million square miles), making it the fifth lowest maximum in the satellite record (1978-2014). Antarctic sea ice reached its annual minimum on February 23, and was the fourth highest Antarctic minimum in the satellite record. While this continues a strong pattern of greater-than-average sea ice extent in Antarctica for the past two years…

Arctic on Thin Ice

Arctic Sea Ice: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Arctic sea ice - the ice that freezes and floats on Arctic waters - is thinning at a steadier and faster rate than researchers previously thought, a new study finds. Using modern and historic measurements, the researchers got an extensive view of how the thickness of Arctic sea ice has changed over the past few decades. According to measurements from multiple sources, the ice in the central Arctic Ocean thinned 65 percent between 1975 and 2012, from 11.7 feet (3.59 meters) to 4.1 feet (1.25 m).

Arctic Sea Ice Decline

Photo: NASA

Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean is at its lowest May level since records began in the 1980s, says Al Jazeera. The lowest levels in the history of Arctic sea ice observation for this time of year and likely the lowest levels for hundreds, even thousands of years. The problem is not just one of a new record low. It’s one of timing and divergence. Accelerated melt in the May-to-June time-frame can have serious impacts on late season ice. The reason is that greatly reduced ice coverage also reduces albedo or reflectivity.

Arctic Sea Ice May Vanish Even If World Achieves Climate Goal

© Andreas Altenburger / Adobe Stock

Arctic sea ice may vanish in summers this century even if governments achieve a core target for limiting global warming set by almost 200 nations in 2015, scientists said on Monday. Arctic sea ice has been shrinking steadily in recent decades, damaging the livelihoods of indigenous peoples and wildlife such as polar bears while opening the region to more shipping and oil and gas exploration. Under the 2015 Paris Agreement, governments set a goal of limiting the rise in average world temperatures to well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times…

Royal Navy Data Provide Insights for Arctic Science

Image: Arctic Council Secretariat

The researchers at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) have investigated the nature of turbulence in the ocean beneath the Arctic sea-ice using recently released Royal Navy submarine data reports Science Daily. This meeting of oceanography and military intelligence has seen declassified data from the 1990s analyzed to gain insights into how diminished ice cover affects turbulence in arctic waters. Recent decreases in Arctic sea ice may have a big impact on the circulation, chemistry and biology of the Arctic Ocean, due to ice-free waters becoming more turbulent.

Ice Free Arctic?

Photo Credits: NASA/Kate Ramsayer

Arctic melting slowed enough in midsummer that scientists don't expect this year's sea ice minimum to set a new record. This year’s melt season in the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas started with a bang, with a record low maximum extent in March and relatively rapid ice loss through May. The melt slowed down in June, however, making it highly unlikely that this year’s summertime sea ice minimum extent will set a new record. “Even when it’s likely that we won’t have a record low, the sea ice is not showing any kind of recovery.

Arctic Summers Possibly Ice-free Within Twenty Years

"It’s not a question of 'if' there will be nearly ice-free summers, but 'when,' say two NOAA scientists. James Overland of NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and Muyin Wang of the NOAA Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean at the University of Washington, consider that the Arctic summers will be ice free before 2050 and possibly within the next decade or two. The two scientists looked at three methods of predicting when the Arctic will be nearly ice free in the summer in a work that was published recently online in the American Geophysical Union publication Geophysical Research Letters. “Rapid Arctic sea ice loss is probably the most visible indicator of global climate change…

Arctic Sea Ice Melt at Higher Level

Image: National Snow and Ice Data Center

Sea ice is decreasing in the Arctic but year-to-year variability in sea ice extent is large. Ice extent is influenced by atmospheric circulation, with temperatures dictating ice melt, and winds shifting the ice, reports the Nature. According to National Snow and Ice Data Center, through the first half of July, Arctic sea ice extent continued tracking close to levels in 2012, the summer that ended with the lowest September extent in the satellite record. The stormy weather pattern that characterized June has persisted into July.

Arctic Sea Ice Report

The National Snow and Ice Data Center, sponsored by the University of Colorado and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), issued its report on Arctic sea ice. The ice in the Arctic Ocean has reached its minimum extent for 2009 and is starting to reform. This year’s minimum extent is above the record and near-record minimums of the last two years, but lower than the average minimums of the past 30 years. (9/17/09). (Source: Bryant’s Maritime News)

Changes in the Arctic: Background and Issues

Summary - A Report to Congress. The diminishment of Arctic sea ice has led to increased human activities in the Arctic, and has heightened interest in, and concerns about, the region’s future. The United States, by virtue of Alaska, is an Arctic country and has substantial interests in the region. On January 12, 2009, the George W. Bush Administration released a presidential directive, called National Security Presidential Directive 66/Homeland Security Presidential Directive 25 (NSPD 66/HSPD 25), establishing a new U.S. policy for the Arctic region. Record low extent of Arctic sea ice in 2007 focused scientific and policy attention on its linkage to global climate change, and to the implications of projected ice-free seasons in the Arctic within decades.

Keppel and ConocoPhillips to Build Arctic Jackup

Keppel and ConocoPhillips to design first ice-worthy jackup rig for the Arctic Offshore. Joint project will yield breakthroughs in offshore Arctic drilling. Keppel Offshore & Marine Technology Centre (KOMtech), a design and engineering arm of Keppel Offshore & Marine (Keppel O&M), and ConocoPhillips are jointly designing a first-of-its-kind ice-worthy jackup rig to operate in one of the harshest marine frontiers, the Arctic Seas. This jackup rig will have dual cantilevers to optimise drilling operations within a limited time window. The rig is capable of operating in a self-sustained manner for 14 days and is equipped with a hull that is designed for towing in ice.

Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice at Record Low in January

Photo: © staphy / Adove Stock

The extent of sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic last month was the lowest on record for January, the U.N. World Meteorological Organization said on Friday, while concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere hit a January record. "The missing ice in both poles has been quite extraordinary," David Carlson, director of the World Climate Research Programme, told a U.N. briefing in Geneva. "It is a quite strange situation. The month of January was probably the second or third hottest such month on record, but that was not a reliable indicator of the state of the climate, he said.

Melting Sea Ice: A Canary in the Coal Mine

© André Gilden / Adobe Stock

The rapid loss of Arctic sea ice is a sentinel. Most of us will never venture into the Arctic, but it can and does provide us with a forewarning of impacts coming to our parts of the Earth – and some of the most significant impacts will directly affect the maritime industry. In earlier times, coal miners were sometimes overcome by the buildup of odorless carbon monoxide gas. Some died as a consequence. Eventually it was realized that canaries were more susceptible to the gas than were humans.

Arctic Ice Retreat Continues

Yellow line: Northwest Passage. The International Ice Charting Working Group (IICWG), meeting at ESRIN in Frascati, issued the following statement on October 26, 2007: “In September 2007, the Arctic sea ice reached the minimum extent in the history of ice charting based on satellite, aircraft and surface observations, continuing a recent trend of diminishing sea ice that began in the 1980’s and has accelerated. While there will still be natural inter-annual variability, the decline is likely to continue. “The Arctic is already experiencing an increase in shipping, primarily for oil and gas development and tourism, and we can expect to see further increases as diminishing ice extent makes Arctic marine transportation more viable.

Malta & Russia – Update Re MV Arctic Sea

The Malta Maritime Authority issued a press release stating that the MV Arctic Sea is under the control of Russian Authorities and is located 16 nautical miles off Las Palmas. A team comprised of officials from the Malta Police Force and the Malta Maritime Authority boarded the ship on 10 September and are currently carrying out a maritime safety investigation in parallel with a law enforcement investigation. (9/11/09). (Source: Bryant’s Maritime News)  

Arctic Sea Mystery Continues

According to an August 16 report from www.presstv.ir, Finnish officials have rejected claims that the MV Arctic Sea, a missing Russian-manned freighter, was carrying a secret nuclear cargo. Russia and NATO joined forces on August 16, the report stated, in an international hunt for the ship that vanished from the radar after crossing the English Channel in late July. (Source: www.presstv.ir)

Steel Cut for Yamal LNG Project’s Lead Tanker

SCF Yamalmax mock up (image courtesy of SCF Group)

A steel-cutting ceremony was held on September 29 for the lead gas tanker ordered by SCF Group for transportation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) under the Yamal LNG project. The prototype vessel will be operated under a long-term time charter between OAO Sovcomflot and JSC Yamal LNG. The steel-cutting ceremony, marking the formal start of a ship’s construction process, took place at the Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Ltd. (South Korea) shipyard in the presence of representatives from OAO Sovcomflot…

Trailblazing Through Ice: Russia Optimistic About 'Short Cut' Sea Route

Russia expressed optimism about plans for a short-cut Arctic sea route between Europe and the Pacific Ocean despite skepticism from the Russian military and some foreign shipowners. "Of course there are problems...but we look at the future of the Northern Sea Route with optimism," Russian Transport Minister Sergei Frank said. The seaway is almost 40 percent, or up or 4,000 miles (6,400 km), shorter than conventional routes via the Suez or Panama canals between Europe and Japan. The end of the Cold War has revived mariners' dreams of creating a commercial passage through the ice. Frank said Russia is studying the building of a new generation of nuclear ice-breakers…

Russia is Open for Business at NEVA 2013

NEVA 2013, which convenes in Russia’s ‘maritime capital’ St Petersburg between September 24 and 27, will offer delegates and exhibitors the opportunity to scrutinise the significant developments in the structure and operation of Russia’s maritime industries and the nation’s growing presence on the international stage. Organized by UK-based Dolphin Exhibitions at the Lenexpo exhibition complex, NEVA 2013 is expected to attract more than 870 exhibitors from over 55 countries seeking to broaden trading ties with Russia. It will also feature a wide-ranging conference and seminar programme with an array of leading Russian and foreign experts ready to debate the key issues.

RS at Offshore Marintec Russia

From October 7-10, 2014, Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RS) will participate in Offshore Marintec Russia, the International Conference and Exhibition, a new project for the Russian market. The event is focused on offshore development and is dedicated to the specialists of oil and gas industry. During the exhibition RS will present “Member’s Area”, a new information service which enables the RS customers, depending on the category, to access various RS information resources and databases. RS experts will actively participate in the Conference. Within the Conference Session ’Development of Modern Offshore Fleet for the Exploration of the Arctic and the Shelf of Russia‘ Georgiy Bedrik…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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