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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Bow Mariner News

Bow Mariner Salvage Operation Ends

The operation to locate and recover the missing crew from the Bow Mariner and remove fuel oil ended Friday, March 26, with the approval of the Coast Guard. The salvage effort was called off after a comprehensive search using a sophisticated ROV (remotely operated vehicle), an analysis of high-resolution video images and evaluating extensive soundings of the sunken vessel's fuel tanks. "We are saddened because we did not locate any of the 18 missing seamen," said a joint statement by Ceres and Odfjell, respectively the managers and owners of the Bow Mariner. Salvage experts retained by Ceres and Odfjell presented the results of their findings to Coast Guard officers at Norfolk's Marine Safety Office Friday.

Bow Mariner Investigation Completed

The investigation of the Feb. 28, 2004 sinking of a chemical tank ship off the coast of Virginia has been completed. A press conference is scheduled for Tuesday January 3, 2006, at 10 a.m. to be held at Coast Guard Sector Hampton Roads at 200 Granby Street, in Norfolk. The speaker will be Capt. Robert O' Brien, Captain of the Port of Hampton Roads. He will be accompanied by Jerry Crooks, Chief of Investigations at Sector Hampton Roads. The Bow Mariner, a 570-foot, 40,000-ton tanker exploded with 27 people aboard. It was carrying 3.2 million gallons of industrial-grade ethanol, plus 200,000 gallons of No. 6 fuel oil and 53,000 gallons of diesel oil.

Chem Tanker Explodes Off Virginia

On Saturday, February 28, the 570-ft. chemical tanker Bow Mariner apparently caught fire and exploded about 50 miles off the coast off Chincoteague, Virginia. As of Monday, March 1, only nine of the 27 crew have been accounted for; six alive and three dead, while it appears that the search for the remaining 18 crew members will be called off. The tanker was carrying a reported 3.5 million gallons of industrial grade ethanol, and an estimated 193,000 gallons of bunker fuel. It exploded shortly after 6 p.m. and sank at approximately 7:30 p.m. The Singapore-flagged was owned by Odfjell and operated by Ceres Hellenic Shipping Enterprises Ltd. in Greece. It was transiting from New York to Houston with 24 Filipino and three Greek crewmembers.

Bow Mariner Update: Oil Recovery Ops Continue

According to the Coast Guard, the Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC) oil recovery vessel VIRGINIA RESPONDER began skimming operations, however, recoverable oil is widely dispersed and the amount recovered has been minimal to date. A helicopter has been flying throughout the day to locate patches of oil and direct the skimming vessel. The oil spill recovery vessel has been on-scene since Monday prepared to recover oil. Previous flights of the area located oil that was too spotty, patchy and widely dispersed to efficiently pick-up. On-scene conditions are favorable. During a Tuesday over flight, patches of oil were located in the area where the T/V BOW MARINER sank Saturday night.

Bow Mariner Update: Oil Recovery Efforts Continue

A fire-damaged lifeboat from the Bow Mariner drifts Feb. 29, 2004, after the vessel sank the night before off Chincoteague, Va. The U.S. Coast Guard flights continues off the coast of Virginia to search for survivors and to survey the state of the fuel oil spilled from the chemical tanker which exploded and sank Saturday evening. The vessel, T/V Bow Mariner, a Singapore-flagged chemical tanker, had left Linden, New Jersey for Texas City, Texas, carrying a partial cargo of 3.2 million gallons of ethanol.

Bow Mariner Update: Oil Recovery Efforts Continue

A fire-damaged lifeboat from the Bow Mariner drifts Feb. 29, 2004, after the vessel sank the night before off Chincoteague, Va. The U.S. Coast Guard flights continues off the coast of Virginia to search for survivors and to survey the state of the fuel oil spilled from the chemical tanker which exploded and sank Saturday evening. The vessel, T/V Bow Mariner, a Singapore-flagged chemical tanker, had left Linden, New Jersey for Texas City, Texas, carrying a partial cargo of 3.2 million gallons of ethanol.

Side-Scan Sonar Employed to Explore Bow Mariner

The U.S. Coast Guard is working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ship Rude and will use Side Scan Sonar technology to check the condition of the T/V Bow Mariner that exploded and sank Saturday night. The 90-foot Norfolk, Va., based NOAA Ship Rude is equipped with side scan sonar technology and will sweep the area where the T/V Bow Mariner sank to acquire imagery of the condition of the vessel. This is not the first time the Rude has been used for missions like this. Previously, the RUDE assisted with the search and recovery of TWA flight 800 in 1996 and the search and recovery operations of John F. Kennedy Jr’s aircraft and Egypt Air flight 990 off the Massachusetts coast in 1999.

Sonar Imagery Assists Bow Mariner Investigation

The Coast Guard has released two multi-beam sonar images taken by the NOAA ship Rude of the sunken tanker Bow Mariner. The images, taken March 4, are among a suite of side-scan sonar and multi-beam images provided by RUDE to the Coast Guard for use in its investigation of the cause of the explosion that sank the vessel on February 28. Rude (pronounced Rudy) found the wreck on March 2, and initial side-scan imagery showed the placement and orientation of Bow Mariner. However, Rude had to discontinue operations because of bad weather.

Coast Guard Report Reveals Rule Violation in Tanker Blast

According to reports, the explosion that destroyed a tanker and killed 21 crew in 2004 was caused by the captain's unsafe order to his crew to open vapor-filled cargo tanks for cleaning, the Coast Guard said in a report Tuesday. Opening the hatches on 22 empty tanks caused the highly flammable vapors to escape onto the deck, where the crew of the Bow Mariner was working, according to the report. A spark ignited the mixture of air and vapors from a gasoline additive, the investigators said. The investigation also found that Capt. Efstratios Kavouras abandoned ship without sending a distress call or trying to save his crew, contributing to the high death toll. The 570-ft.

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History - February 28

1867-  As ordered by the Treasury Department, each officer of Revenue Cutter Service, while on duty, was entitled to one Navy ration per day. 1871- Congress passed 16 Stat. 458 which addressed shortcomings in previous legislation regarding the inspection and certification of steamboats and their crews. This Act established the Steamboat Inspection Service within the Department of Treasury headed by a Supervisory Inspector General answerable to the Treasury Secretary. The Act also provided SIS inspectors with greater authority over more aspects of the maritime field. 1942- Certain duties of former Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation transferred to Coast Guard temporarily by Executive Order 9083. The transfer was made permanent on July 16, 1946. Also, the U.S.

SMIT Wins Bow Mariner Salvage Contract

SMIT Salvage was contracted to assist in locating the missing 18 seamen of the sunken tanker ‘Bow Mariner’ in the U.S. SMIT will deploy an ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) and specialized divers to locate the missing crewmembers of this accident. SMIT’s second task is to remove the bunker oil from the tanker that lies in the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of approximately 264 feet, 50 nautical miles off the coast of Virginia. Until now heavy weather has prevented the ROV from being launched to begin the search for the missing seamen of the vessel and from making video footage to determine whether there remain recoverable quantities of ethanol and fuel oil in the vessel.

Bow Mariner oil skimming successful

Oil skimming was suspended this weekend as bad weather moved toward the site where the tanker T/V BOW MARINER exploded and sank off the Virginia coast Saturday night. Helicopter over-flights showed the oil was mostly in thin sheens on the water, strung out in long streamers, and widely separated, limiting the amount the skimming vessel, the VIRGINIA RESPONDER, was able to recover. The sixth and final member of the crew was released from Sentara Norfolk General Hospital. All of the survivors have had an opportunity to meet with diplomatic officials from their native Philippine Islands, and have had an opportunity to call their families. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration vessel RUDE made a second attempt to obtain images of the sunken vessel with its side-scan sonar.

Maersk Supply Service Wins Contract With Quadrant Energy

Photo: Maersk Supply Service

Maersk Master and Maersk Mariner, Maersk Supply Service’s two first Starfish-class anchor handling vessels built in 2017, will be on contract with Quadrant Energy in Western Australia, commencing March 2018. Both vessels will support Quadrant Energy’s Phoenix South and Van Gogh drilling campaign which will initially cover three wells for a duration of 150 to 200 days. The highly modern and efficient vessels will be supporting Transocean’s semi-submersible rig DD1 with supply and anchor handling duties throughout the campaign. “Quadrant Energy is an important customer.

Coast Guard Crew Recognized for Heroism

Coast Guardsmen from Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., are scheduled to be recognized in a ceremony Feb. 22 at 11 a.m. at the air station. The recognition is for the crewmembers' heroism during the Coast Guard’s response to a chemical tanker explosion off the coast of Virginia nearly a year ago. North Carolina Senator Richard Burr and Coast Guard Fifth District Commander, Rear Adm. Sally Brice-O’Hara, are both scheduled to take part in the ceremony. Among the awardees is Petty Officer William (Dave) Foreman, a rescue swimmer who is being awarded the distinguished Coast Guard Medal. The Coast Guard Medal is one of the highest awards in the service.

Odfjell Brings More Ships Under Norwegian Flag

Odfjell brought M/T Bow Brasilia (5,870 DWT/built 1997) and a newbuilding from Korea into the Norwegian International Ship Register (NIS). The M/T Bow Brasilia and the 51,000 DWT newbuilding are two out of five vessels that Odfjell has planned to bring into NIS registration in 2010. Odfjell took delivery of the newbuilding on 28 April from SLS Shipbuilding Co Ltd, Korea. The change of flag on Bow Brasilia is due to relocation of chartering, operation and ship management from Germany to Bergen. Odfjell has 25 vessels registered in NIS, and is the largest employer of Norwegian mariners under NIS flag. “If we see the shipping industry getting more stable conditions in the future, we will consider increasing our number of vessels in NIS,” said Jan A. Hammer, President/CEO Odfjell SE.

Jumbo Orders LNG-powered Heavy Lift Ship

(Image: Ulstein Design & Solutions B.V.)

Dutch transportation and installation contractor Jumbo said it has signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) with shipbuilder China Merchants Industry Holdings (CMIH) for the construction of a new heavy lift crane vessel (HLCV) scheduled for delivery in the first quarter of 2020. The DP2 vessel will feature dual fuel engines capable of operating on liquefied natural gas (LNG), and will be built to serve the offshore wind and the offshore oil and gas industries. “Despite the current offshore climate, we are committing to this industry long term,” said Jumbo managing director, Michael Kahn.

Odfjells Announces Good 1Q Results

Odfjell's consolidated net result after tax was $34 million the first quarter 2004 compared to $18 million 1Q 2003. The first quarter 2004 figure includes capital gains on assets of $9 million. Time-charter results per day improved by 9 percent compared to first quarter 2003 and to the full year 2003. Increased voyage expenses reflect the increased number of ships in the fleet. Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) for first quarter 2004 were $53 million, up from $41 million first quarter 2003. Operating result (EBIT), including capital gain on assets, was $38 million in the first quarter 2004, compared to $19 million in the first quarter 2003.

Maritime Accidents on the Decline

INTERTANKO has recorded 60 tanker incidents during the first part of 2004, most of them minor with no resultant pollution or loss of life. This compares to the 130 tanker incidents reported for the whole of 2003. The biggest pollution incident during the first half of 2004 appeared to be 200 tonnes oil lost from the Everton, which was laden with 80,400 tonnes of crude oil. The tanker caught fire off the Gulf of Oman on 22 March 2004 and was abandoned by its crew. The oil was reported to have been mainly burnt up. One seafarer was reported missing after this incident. The other pollution incidents recorded were very minor. As in 2003 the most serious tanker incidents in 2004 have involved fire and explosion (F&E). Sadly we have reports of 44 people killed or missing.

Blount Industries' M/V Grande Mariner

Blount Industries newest cruise ship, M/V Grande Mariner, was built for American Canadian Caribbean Line, Inc. It is the second in a new line of Grande Class small cruise ships, built and designed for the American Canadian Caribbean Line, Inc. The 183 ft. ship accommodates 100 passengers, and is designed with several ACCL innovations, includinug patented bow ramp, shallow draft and retractable pilot house. Grande Mariner also features super-quiet engines and generators, ice-strengthening and a specially designed clear air system. The ship's hull is steel constructed with an aluminum superstructure. It is powered by two D2842LE Man diesel engines, producing 1,440 bhp @ 1,800 rpm. The engines turn two five-blade 48 x 39 in.

A Worker to Explore the Seabed

Photo courtesy Seabed AS / Cummins Norway AS

Mariners have become accustom to seeing ever more complex and sophisticated vessels launched in support of the petroleum exploration industry. A new level was set this year when the Norwegian yard Fjellstrand AS launched the multi-purpose offshore vessel Seabed Worker for Seabed AS of Begen Norway. The DP2 classed vessel has two 2500 kW stern-mounted Voith propulsion units, a Rolls Royce 1000-kW tunnel bow thruster and a Rolls Royce 1000-kW retractable azimuthing bow thruster.

Mass Maritime’s Manned Model Shiphandling Program

As advances in computing power have made marine training via simulator more mainstream, the majority would contend that the most effective training is on the water, at the helm. While training on real-world vessels can be tough due to time and safety constraints, Massachusetts Maritime Academy maintains its unique solutions: the Manned Model Shiphandling Program on the Great Herring Pond. The Manned Model Shiphandling Program at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy is unique in that it is only one of a handful in the world to offer mariner’s hands-on training courtesy of professionally built…

Three Mariners Rescued from Sinking Ship

The Coast Guard rescued three mariners from a sinking fishing vessel Saturday in the vicinity of Calibogue Sound, S.C., January 12. Watchstanders in the Coast Guard Sector Charleston command center received a report from Beaufort County Dispatch stating the 62-foot fishing vessel Christina Leigh was taking on water, at 3 p.m. The three mariners aboard had to place the call via cell phone since their VHF radio was damaged. Sector Charleston personnel put out an Urgent Marine Information Broadcast and launched crewmembers from Coast Guard Station Tybee Island at 3:04 p.m. A crew aboard a rescue helicopter from Coast Guard Air Station Savannah was also launched. The helicopter crew arrived on scene and located the vessel at 4 p.m.

Schottel Optimizes Training With Simulator

Image: Courtesy Schottel

Since autumn 2014 customers can exercise their handling and knowledge of SCHOTTEL propulsion systems in the SCHOTTEL Academy by using a training simulator. Academy participants are seated as if on the bridge of a real vessel and learn how to deal safely with the different SCHOTTEL propulsion systems, control levers, operator panels and displays. Again and again, crews are faced with situations where a fast response is essential – both during their normal work and even more so in emergencies, such as sudden evasive manoeuvres or system failures.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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