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Friday, December 15, 2017

Canal Waters Time News

Panama Canal Administrator Briefs Asia

In a speech delivered to influential business leaders, the Administrator of the Panama Canal, Alberto Alemán Zubieta, briefed members of the American Institute for Shippers' Associations (AISA) on the state of the Panama Canal and the importance of Panama as a logistics and transportation center. Alemán highlighted the Canal's increasing importance to global trade - particularly cargo coming from Asia - and impressive record of creating operational efficiencies, executing the Canal's vast modernization program and improving Canal safety. Of late, the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) has shifted its model by operating the Canal as a business and has made tremendous progress in shortening transit time and reducing accidents.

Track & Turntable System for Panama Canal

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) updated its track and turntable system located in the Canal’s Gatun Locks. The system continuously transports locomotives through the locks to assist transiting vessels. Previously, vessels stopped midway through the locks to exchange locomotives, increasing Canal Waters Time or the average time it takes a vessel to navigate the Canal. The new system enables two additional Panamax vessels to transit the waterway every day. “The new track and turntable system significantly enhances the efficiency and safety of the Canal…

Panama Canal Transit Hits Record

The trend of larger ships using the Panama Canal is increasing, as evidenced by the record set recently in May 2005 of 120 transits made by vessels 900 ft. or more. Of these 120 transits, 117 were made by full container vessels and three were made by cruise ships. The record breaks the previous mark achieved in January 2005 of 114 transits of these types of vessels. Canal Waters Time (CWT), the average time it takes a vessel to transit the Canal, including waiting time for passage, did not increase, despite the volume of transits and larger vessels handled.

Panama Canal Takes Steps to Shrink Wait Times

Panama Canal Miraflores Locks (Photo: ACP)

Aiming to help accommodate unseasonably high demand, the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) announced it has taken a number of steps to expedite traffic and decrease Canal Waters Time (CWT).   The ACP has postponed noncritical maintenance work, modified bookings and assigned additional operations personnel. As a result, the canal has made steady progress, according to ACP.   ACP said current wait times for transiting ships have been reduced and now stands at four days or less. Moreover, the number of ships awaiting transit has been cut by 40 percent from its recent high in October.

Panama Canal Authority Reduces Time

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) announced that it has reduced by 16.6 percent, the time a vessel spends in Canal waters until it completes its transit through the waterway. The average Canal Waters Time (CWT) for 2001-2002 was 26.2 hours, compared to an average CWT of 31.4 hours for 1999-2000. The difference represents a 5.2-hour average savings to vessels on each trip through the Canal. Moreover, the reduction was more dramatic for shippers using the Canal's "reservation system," where ships are able to reserve an exact date to transit the Canal, resulting in precise scheduling. Ships that employed the reservation system took only 18.6 hours to transit the Canal.

Five Panamax Ships Transit Gatun Locks

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) said that five “extreme-sized” panamax ships (more than 900´ in overall length) transited successively through the waterway’s Gatun Locks on August 26, 2004. This accomplishment marks the first time that five of these panamax vessels have transited Gatun Locks consecutively going southbound, toward the Pacific Ocean. Eight locomotives and 16 wires were used to move the vessels through the Locks. Normally, six locomotives and 12 wires are used to accommodate regular panamax vessels.

Panama Canal Authority FY2009 Q3

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) released third quarter (Q3) operational metrics for fiscal year 2009. In Q3, Canal Waters Time (CWT), the average time it takes a vessel to transit the Canal, including waiting time for passage, decreased significantly. Additionally, total transits and net tonnage decreased slightly. These metrics are based on operations from April through June 2009, the third quarter of the ACP's 2009 fiscal year, and are compared with Q3 of fiscal year 2008. Average CWT decreased 47.9 percent – to 19.96 hours from 38.31 hours. CWT for booked vessels (those ships holding reservations) decreased 26.5 percent – to 14.53 hours from 19.77 hours. In Transit Time (ITT) also decreased 26.6 percent – to 9.55 hours from 13.02 hours.

Panama Canal Authority Releases Q1 Operational Metrics

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) released first quarter (Q1) operational metrics today for fiscal year 2007. In Q1, there was an increase in net tonnage, total transits and transits of supers (vessels 91 feet or more in beam). No official accidents occurred this quarter. transit the Canal including waiting time for passage, increased, as well as booking slot utilization. first quarter of the ACP's 2007 fiscal year, and compared to Q1 of fiscal year 2006. Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tonnage increased 11.7 percent – to 79.9 million PC/UMS tons from 71.5 million PC/UMS tons. the Canal experienced an increase in traffic. Total Canal transits increased eight percent – to 3,568 transits from 3,299.

Panama Canal Authority Releases Q3 Metrics

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) released third quarter (Q3) operational metrics for fiscal year 2007. Canal Waters Time (CWT), the average time it takes a vessel to transit the Canal including waiting time for passage, decreased. In Q3, there was also a minor decrease in net tonnage, total transits and booking slot utilization. These metrics are based on operations from April through June of 2007, the third quarter of the ACP's 2007 fiscal year, and compared to Q3 of fiscal year 2006. Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tonnage decreased 0.3 percent - to 75.6m PC/UMS tons from 75.9 million PC/UMS tons. Total Canal transits also decreased 0.3 percent - to 3,727 transits from 3,737.

Panama Canal Authority Announces Quarterly Metrics

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) released results from first quarter operations that show traffic on the Canal has increased both in terms of ships and Panama Canal Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tonnage and that vessels are moving more quickly through the Canal and with fewer accidents than a year ago. These improvements are based on operations from October through December of 2002, the first quarter of the ACP's fiscal year 2003. During the first quarter of FY2003, the Canal continued to improve its safety record, reducing maritime accidents by 33.3 percent with only four accidents -- compared to six for the same period last year.

ACP Releases Second Quarter Metrics

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) released second quarter (Q2) operational metrics today for fiscal year 2007. In Q2, there was an increase in net tonnage, total transits and booking slot utilization. There was also an increase in official accidents. Canal Waters Time (CWT), the average time it takes a vessel to transit the Canal including waiting time for passage, decreased. Q2 of fiscal year 2006. Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tonnage increased 6.30 percent - to 79.7 million PC/UMS tons from 75 million PC/UMS tons. The steady climb in tonnage was complemented by an increase in traffic, including transits of Panamax vessels (the largest vessel that can transit the Canal). 4,052 transits from 3,869.

ACP Announces Fiscal Year 2005 Metrics

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) announced operational metrics for the 2005 fiscal year (FY 05). Year-end statistics reveal a significant drop in Canal Waters Time (CWT), the average time it takes a vessel to navigate the Canal, including waiting time for passage. Moreover, the numbers show a rise in total tonnage and an increase in transits by vessels 900 feet or more in length overall. The ACP's fiscal year runs from October to September. Overall CWT for Panama Canal transits dropped 7.8 percent, compared to statistics from the 2004 fiscal year - to 24.58 hours from 26.66 hours. CWT for booked vessels (those ships holding reservations) remained the same at 16.4 hours. Booked vessels account for more than 50 percent of oceangoing transits.

Panama Canal FY 2010 Q1 Metrics

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) released first quarter (Q1) operational metrics for fiscal year 2010. In Q1, Canal Waters Time (CWT), the average time it takes a vessel to transit the Canal (including waiting time for passage) significantly decreased. There also were increases in total transits and net tonnage. These metrics are based on operations from October through December 2009, the first quarter of the ACP's 2010 fiscal year, and are compared with Q1 of fiscal year 2009. CWT decreased 27.5 percent – to 20.29 hours from 27.97 hours. CWT for booked vessels, those ships holding reservations, also experienced a decrease of 20.7 percent – to 13.43 hours from 16.94 hours. Total Canal transits increased two percent – to 3,590 transits from 3,520.

Panama Canal Authority 2009 Q2 Metrics

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) released second quarter (Q2) operational metrics for fiscal year 2009. In Q2, Canal Waters Time (CWT), the average time it takes a vessel to transit the Canal, including waiting time for passage, decreased significantly, while total transits and net tonnage remained nearly flat. These metrics are based on operations from January through March 2009, the second quarter of the ACP's 2009 fiscal year, and are compared with Q2 of fiscal year 2008. Average CWT decreased 27.9 percent – to 26.22 hours from 36.39 hours. CWT for booked vessels (those ships holding reservations) decreased 19.5 percent – to 15.83 hours from 19.66 hours. The drop in CWT can be attributed to the ACP’s efficient operations and a slight decline in transits.

Panama Canal Authority FY 2009 Metrics

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) announced its operational metrics for the 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009). Most importantly, Canal Waters Time (CWT), the average time it takes a vessel to navigate the Canal, including waiting time, significantly decreased. Fiscal year 2009 (October 2008 – September 2009) statistics show a slight decline in total transits and tonnage compared to FY 2008. In addition, the Canal experienced growth in some principal segments, most notably, general cargo, dry bulk, and tanker transits. In FY 2009, CWT decreased 26.9 percent – from 31.55 to 23.06 hours. For booked vessels (those ships holding reservations), CWT declined 16.1 percent – from 18.52 in FY 2008 to 15.54 hours this year.

Panama Canal 4Q Metrics

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) released fourth quarter (Q4) operational metrics for fiscal year (FY) 2008. These metrics are based on operations from July through September 2008, the fourth quarter of the ACP's 2008 fiscal year and are compared with Q4 of FY 2007. In Q4 of FY 2008, tonnage decreased minimally, but tanker and passenger transits and tonnage jumped significantly. During Q4 of FY 2008, Canal Waters Time (CWT), the average time it takes a vessel to transit the Canal (including waiting time for passage), decreased nearly 10 percent to 26.73 hours from 29.61 hours in Q4 of FY 2007.

Panama Canal Sets New Tonnage Record

Panama Canal Authority Administrator/CEO Jorge Luis Quijano.

The Panama Canal set a mark in its history as it reached a new tonnage record of 333.7 million Panama Canal tons (PC/UMS) during fiscal year 2012 which concluded on September 30. This achievement highlights the value of Panama and its significance as a link in the chain of global trade. "This milestone attests to the reliable and continuous service offered by the Canal, which is supported by a workforce of 10,000 men and women. The Panama Canal works tirelessly to provide its customers with first-rate service…

Panama Canal Releases 2Q Data

Total Canal transits decreased 2 percent during Q2 – from 4,053 to 3,971 transits. Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tonnage also dropped 2.6 percent – from 80.4 million PC/UMS tons to 78.4 million PC/UMS tons. Passenger transits increased 34.8 percent – from 92 to 124 transits – while dry bulk transits rose 6.7 percent, from 586 to 625 transits and dry bulk cargo tonnage increased 10.4 percent, from 12.3 to 13.5 million PC/UMS tons. The number of containers, vehicle carriers, tankers and general cargo dropped when compared to figures for FY 2007. Refrigerated cargo transits slightly decreased, by 1.4 percent, but refrigerated cargo tonnage increased 1.1 percent – from 5.6 million PC/UMS tons to 5.7 million PC/UMS tons.

Panama Canal Sets Records

On July 3, 2003, a record 24 Panamax-sized vessels transited the Panama Canal. Nearly one million tons of cargo were transported through the Canal. Never before has the Canal broken two significant records in the same day. Recent Canal improvements and operational efficiencies have reduced Canal Waters Time (CWT), particularly important to transiting Panamax vessels and enhancing reliability. Over the past several months, the ACP has seen a significant rise in Panamax traffic. The previous Panamax record was 21 vessels in one day, set December 2, 2002; the previous tonnage record was 929,915 PC/UMS tons, set November 14, 2002. Panamax vessels, with beams more than 100 feet, were specifically engineered to navigate the Panama Canal.

Panama Canal Sets Record in Tons of Cargo

March 16 was a great day for the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) as a new significant record was set. More than one million (1,005,551) Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tons of cargo were transported through the Canal. This new record breaks the recent July 3, 2003 figure of a recorded 934,488 PC/UMS tons of cargo. Contributing to the tonnage were the Canal traffic of seven container vessels, 11 dry bulk carriers, four vehicle carriers and three cruise ships. Of the seven container vessels, five were 900 feet long. And, of the cruise ships, one ship was 900 feet long and another measured 800 feet. In addition, total Canal revenue, generated from tolls, exceeded three and one half million dollars - totaling $3,563,490.55.

Panama Canal Sets Cargo Record

On March 16 the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) set a new significant record. were transported through the Canal. recorded 934,488 PC/UMS tons of cargo. four vehicle carriers and three cruise ships. long. And, of the cruise ships, one ship was 900 feet long and another measured 800 feet. totaling $3,563,490.55. "We are very pleased with the new record we have set," said ACP Administrator Alberto Alemán Zubieta. goods to market from Asia to the U.S. East Coast and vice-versa," Alemán added. increased capacity. tugboats and the deepening of Gatun Lake.

Panama Canal Celebrates 5 Years

Five years since the Panama Canal was handed over to the Panamanian people from the United States, the waterway is running better and safer than ever in its 90 years of operation. Beginning a new century under Panamanian stewardship, the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) has set and broken records, made significant improvements and invested in the equipment and infrastructure of the waterway. These accomplishments have helped the “All-Water Route” (the route from Asia to America’s East Coast via the Panama Canal – and back) become a very attractive option for the industry to move cargo between these markets. The five-year anniversary of the Handover falls on December 31, 2004.

Canal Enhances Security with Nine New Boats

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) has acquired nine new patrol boats – an investment to enhance security and safety at the Canal and to provide additional resources for the Security and Environment Department within the ACP. The new patrol boats will be used to monitor the waterway at both the Atlantic and Pacific entrances of the Canal, as well as Gatun Lake (the man-made lake formed during the Canal’s original construction). Similar to the aluminum patrol boats currently used by the U.S. Coast Guard, the boats are 27 and 23 feet long, equipped with both inboard and outboard engines. “The safety and security of the Canal, our customers and their cargo is of utmost importance to those of us who run the Canal.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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