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Friday, January 19, 2018

Channel Deepening News

Port of NY/NJ Deepened for Larger Box Ships

Image: Port of New York & New Jersey

The Port of New York & New Jersey, in partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, has completed a $2.1 billion Main Navigation Channel Deepening Program in order to facilitate the next generation of larger containerships calling the port following the expansion of the Panama Canal. The Port of New York and New Jersey serves as the gateway to one of the most concentrated and affluent consumer markets in the world. The Main Navigation Channel Deepening Program creates a safe…

Port of LA Channel Deepening Project Assessed

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued a supplemental notice of intent regarding changes and additional considerations to be made to the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Port of Los Angeles channel deepening project. The project involves deepening the Inner Harbor Channels to accommodate the most modern vessels in the commercial container fleet. Comments should be submitted by November 21. Source: HK Law

Port of Los Angeles – channel deepening project

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued a Notice stating that it intends to prepare a supplemental environmental impact report with regard to the additional disposal capacity determined to be required for the ongoing Channel Deepening Project in the Port of Los Angeles. A formal scoping meeting will be held in Wilmington, California on November 30. 69 Fed. Reg. 64280 (HK Law).

Congress Approves More than $130M for Port of NY/NJ Projects

Critical channel-deepening and environmental projects at the Port of New York and New Jersey will continue to advance under a funding bill approved this week by Congress. The deeper channels will allow new, larger ships to enter the harbor, maintaining the port’s competitive edge as the leading port on the east coast of North America. The fiscal year 2004 Energy and Water Development appropriations bill, which funds U.S. Army Corps of Engineers civil works projects, includes $110 million for channel-deepening projects in the port. The funding will allow for the continuation of federal channel-deepening projects under construction in the Kill van Kull-Newark Bay, the Arthur Kill and Port Jersey channels.

News:Congress Approves More than $130M for Port of NY/NJ Projects

Critical channel-deepening and environmental projects at the Port of New York and New Jersey will continue to advance under a funding bill approved this week by Congress. The deeper channels will allow new, larger ships to enter the harbor, maintaining the port's competitive edge as the leading port on the east coast of North America. The fiscal year 2004 Energy and Water Development appropriations bill, which funds U.S. Army Corps of Engineers civil works projects, includes $110 million for channel-deepening projects in the port. The funding will allow for the continuation of federal channel-deepening projects under construction in the Kill van Kull-Newark Bay, the Arthur Kill and Port Jersey channels.

Delaware River Main Channel Deepening Project Justified

After an economic reanalysis, the United States Army Corps of Engineers announced that Delaware River Main Channel Deepening Project is justified for construction. The conclusion of the reanalysis is that the project will yield a net benefit of $1.18 for every $1 spent on the project. Maj. Gen. Robert Griffin, director of Civil Works for USACE, said, "Our comprehensive economic reanalysis shows that the Delaware River Main Channel Deepening Project is a sound investment for the nation. "The reanalysis has been thoroughly reviewed by an external independent panel. That panel determined the reanalysis to be based on sound economics. Work on the Delaware project was suspended by Griffin on April 22…

Project Aimed to Reduce Emissions

The Port Authority Board of Commissioners has approved a measure to undertake a demonstration project with the New York City Department of Transportation to retrofit a Staten Island ferryboat with new exhaust emission reduction devices. If the project is successful, a new agreement between the two agencies could be developed to retrofit the remaining six vessels in the Staten Island Ferry fleet. The demonstration project grew out of discussions with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and environmental agencies in New Jersey, New York and New York City on air impacts associated with the upcoming project to deepen channels in New York harbor to 50 feet.

Go Ahead for Brownsville Ship Channel Deepening

President Barack Obama signed into law the Water Resources and Development Act (WRDA) of 2016, authorizing the Brownsville Ship Channel deepening project, making it eligible for federal funding, as announced by the Port of Brownsville. The Brazos Island Harbor Channel Improvement Project was one of 28 water infrastructure projects nationwide included in the WRDA and submitted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to Congress for approval. The project calls for the Port of Brownsville channel to be deepened to 52 feet from its current design depth of 42 feet. When complete, the Port of Brownsville will become one of the deepest ports in the Gulf of Mexico. “The deepening of the channel strengthens the port’s infrastructure and increases our global competitiveness.

Public Meetings to be held on Norfolk Channel Deepening Project

The US Navy published a notice stating that it intends to prepare an environmental impact statement for proposed dredging of the Norfolk Harbor Channel in the Elizabeth River. The dredging is necessary to provide the service’s aircraft carriers with safe and unrestricted access. Public scoping meetings will be held in Norfolk (October 4) and Portsmouth, Virginia (October 5). Source: HK Law

Panama City Dredging Project Underway

The Port of Panama City and the U. S. Corps of Engineers have begun a joint dredging project to deepen Panama City’s entrance channel and turning basin from 32 ft. to 36 ft. Inland Dredging Company of Dyersburg, Tennessee will begin work in the channel in January. The Panama City Port Authority is in the process of bidding the dredging work in the berthing areas. The entire project will cost approximately $8.5 million dollars and be completed by the end of May, 2003. The channel deepening is the first of a series of major improvements underway at the Port of Panama City.

Port of NY/NJ Reports Cargo Increase

The Port of New York and New Jersey saw its container volume grow by a dramatic 13 percent in 2002, sparked by a substantial increase in Asian trade. Port Commerce Director Richard M. Larrabee said the New York-New Jersey port accounted for 59.6 percent of the containerized cargo handled by all North Atlantic ports, and 13.5 percent of all U.S. New York Governor George E. Pataki said, “The strength and vitality of the port has clearly given the New York regional economy a needed boost at a critical time. Port Commerce Director Larrabee said, “The 13-percent increase in the port’s containerized cargo reinforces our belief that more and more shippers are migrating to the use of all-water services to transport their products from Asia to the Northeastern and Midwestern parts of this country.

Panama Canal Deepening Project Ahead of Schedule

Panama Canal Authority project to deepen the navigational channel in Gatun Lake is 40 percent complete - ahead of schedule and within budget. The project's goal is to deepen the channel in the Lake, the large, man-made body of water that all ships navigate when transiting the Canal. Among the many benefits, when complete, the deepening will provide an additional meter of water storage, a 45 percent increase. This would minimize future draft restrictions, enhancing reliability and improving vessel safety, and accommodate future demand for drinking water.

Port Authority Receives Approval to Begin Deepening Program

The Port Authority announced today that it has received approval from the Army Corps of Engineers to deepen a section of the Kill van Kull to 50 feet, launching the agency’s ambitious $1.8 billion project to dredge the region’s harbor channels to 50 feet and maintain its ranking as the leading East Coast destination for shippers from around the world. Under eight separate dredging contracts, the Corps and the Port Authority are working together to deepen the Kill Van Kull from 40 to 45 feet. In the near term, the Corps’ new action will allow the Port Authority to augment one of those contracts to deepen a section of the Kill van Kull around Bergen Point to 50 feet.

Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Net Arthur Kill Contract

Arthure Kill Channel Area: Image credit US ACE

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) contract is for deepening NY/NJ Arthur Kill Channel to 50 feet. The contract area for this project is along Newark Bay, New Jersey and the Arthur Kill, Borough of Staten Island, New York, N.Y. Its  value is $41,368,100, cost-shared with The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. The project includes drilling, blasting, dredging, and disposal of rock. contract will not adversely affect the surrounding communities. The Arthur Kill Channel…

L.A. to Review YTI Improvement Proposal

The Los Angeles Harbor Commission approved a resolution initiating an Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) on a proposed berth-improvement project by Yusen Terminals Inc. (YTI). Start of the EIR process is the first step in YTl’s proposed plan to deepen and improve its terminal facilities, allowing the terminal operator to accommodate next-generation vessels and increase cargo volume at its site. “Terminal modernization and improvements such as those proposed by Yusen Terminals Inc. are key to the Port of Los Angeles’ long-term global competitiveness and success,” said Port Executive Director Geraldine Knatz, Ph.D.

Aids to Navigation Receives Funding of $4.6 mil

The Mariners’ Advisory Committee for the Bay and River Delaware, the Pilots Association for the Bay and River Delaware, and the Maritime Exchange for the Delaware River and Bay applaud the inclusion of a $4.6 million request for aids to navigation, or ATONs, in President Obama’s FY17 U.S. Coast Guard budget justification. "Thanks to efforts last year by Sens. Cory Booker, Robert Casey, Christopher Coons, and Robert Menendez, the president's FY17 budget includes a proposal for an additional $4.6 million for U.S. Coast Guard to improve safety and navigation aids on the Delaware River," said Jonathan Kemmerley, chairman of the Mariners’ Advisory Committee. "I was encouraged to see the president's budget request include $4.6 million to be used for improving navigation on the Delaware River.

Jasper Ocean Terminal Budget Approved

The Jasper Ocean Terminal (JOT) board of directors met earlier this week to solidify a budget and work plan for FY2016 as well as review work completed during the 2015 fiscal year. The board approved a 2016 fiscal year budget that includes accomplishing further studies of the site design, sediment, access corridor and channel improvements necessary for the largest containerships, as well as efforts to recruit a third party required for completion of an environmental impact study. Cosponsors Georgia Ports Authority (GPA) and SC Ports Authority (SCPA) will each contribute $1.25 million to the FY2016 budget. “This was a watershed meeting for our board,” said board chairman David Posek.

Savannah Harbor Expansion Project Update

GPA Executive Director Curtis Foltz, left, and Lt. General Thomas Bostick, commander of the USACE, give an update on the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project as cranes work a vessel, Thursday, May 28, 2015, at the Garden City Terminal near Savannah, Ga. (Photo: Georgia Ports Authority/Stephen B. Morton)

Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick, commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, visited the Port of Savannah on Thursday, for an update on the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project (SHEP). "The SHEP will create economic opportunity not only across Georgia, but throughout the Southeast," said Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal. The harbor deepening, currently in the construction phase, will deepen the shipping channel from 42 to 47 feet at mean low water. This will allow today's larger, more efficient vessels to transit the channel with heavier loads and greater scheduling flexibility.

Port of NY/NJ Shows Gains in 2001

Cargo volumes in the Port of New York and New Jersey grew by 5.6 percent in 2001, despite the economic downturn that saw cargo volumes in other North Atlantic ports decline during the year, Port Authority Port Commerce Director Richard M. Larrabee announced. Larrabee said the New York-New Jersey port outperformed all other North Atlantic ports combined, which reported cargo tonnage declines of 1.3 percent. He said that the New York-New Jersey port saw growth in virtually every sector - containerized cargo, bulk, breakbulk and rail activity. Port Authority Executive Director Joseph J. Seymour said, "The Port Authority is moving ahead with a program of investments to keep the port a world-class shipping destination.

U.S. Ports Applaud Passage of Water Resources Bill

Representatives of public seaports in the United States today are lauding Congress for passing HR 1495, the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 2007, citing it as long overdue legislation that addresses a seven-year backlog of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers programs, including navigation projects, policies and procedures that are necessary to keep pace with today's burgeoning trade. The Act helps to address demand for critical water resources projects and the costs to implement them. Numerous projects and provisions in the WRDA 2007 bill will help address port waterside infrastructure needs. Included are projects for navigation channel deepening, dredged material disposal and storage facilities, and policy provisions to improve the Corps of Engineers project implementation process.

Specialist Maritime Engineer Joins Arup’s Houston Office

Arup, the multidisciplinary engineering and consulting firm, has been joined by Larry Wise as an associate and maritime engineer in the firm’s Houston office. In this role, explains Arup, he will be responsible for leading and executing energy and maritime assignments, supporting and servicing regional energy, oil and gas terminals, ports and marine terminals, urban waterfront restorations, and environmental restoration projects. A seasoned coastal and marine engineer with more than 18 years of experience in the marine and environmental industries, Larry has worked on several notable projects recently including the Mozambique LNG Export Facility project, the Texas City Channel Deepening project, and the Alaska LNG Export Terminal.

Rochford Lauds Decision to Move Ahead on Channel Deepening Project

Governors Ed Rendell and Jon Corzine are to be commended for reaching an agreement to move forward on the Delaware River Main Channel (45-ft.) Deepening Project. This accomplishment is expected to propel regional port development and allow all Delaware River port facilities to competitively attract the emerging class of larger cargo vessels. Because of growing congestion problems experienced by West Coast ports, the reality today is that ocean carriers operating in the trans-pacific route are diverting larger cargo vessels through the Suez Canal to East Coast ports. The proposed Philadelphia Regional Port Authority Southport Project…

Yusen Container Terminal Draft EIS/EIR Released

The Port of Los Angeles and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Report (EIS/EIR) for the Yusen Terminals Inc. (YTI) Container Terminal Improvements Project, located at Berths 212-224 at the Port of Los Angeles, on the north side of Terminal Island along the Cerritos Channel, near the East Basin. The proposed project entails improving Berths 214-216 wharves, increasing berth depth from -45 to -53 feet, and improving Berths 217-220 wharves to make way for 100-foot gauge gantry cranes, as well as deepening to a -47 feet berth depth. The project will also construct additional on-dock rail yard capacity for YTI.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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