Marine Link
Sunday, January 21, 2018

Danger News

Tug Safety Training Offered at Port of Milford Haven

Milford Haven's simulator suite has the potential to put you at the helm of any marine vessel, in any port. (Photo: MPHA)

A powerful virtual-reality ship simulation system, operated by the Port of Milford Haven is running courses to train tug boat operators from across Britain. The Navigation Suite, based at Milford Waterfront, creates highly realistic computer-generated versions of any port in the world, giving trainees the opportunity to take the controls of any vessel, including tugboats, to practice scenarios. Tug skippers from Williams Marine Services and Teignmouth Harbor Commission spent two days undertaking theory based safety training and working on simulated ‘as real’ scenarios within the port.

Maritime Piracy Activity is at a 22-year Low -Report

In March 2017 fuel tanker Aris 13 was attacked by armed pirates off the coast of Somalia (Photo: EU NAVFOR)

Global maritime piracy activity fell to its lowest level in over two decades, according to the latest International Maritime Bureau (IMB) report. The 180 incidents of piracy and armed robbery against ships reported to the International Chamber of Commerce’s (ICC) IMB in 2017 was the lowest annual number since 1995, when 188 incidents were reported. According to the IMB, pirates boarded 136 vessels in 2017, while 22 attacks were attempted, 16 vessels fired upon and six vessels hijacked.

Tanker Collided with Oil Rig in North Sea

Image: Essberger

The tanker Elsa Essberger collided with unmanned oil rig Q1 with is no longer in use, at around 1820 UTC Dec 31 in North sea some 20 nm southwest of Den Helder, Netherlands. The platform Q1 Halfway is not in use and according to the Coast Guard there were no people at the time of the collision. The plant built there in 1995 is part of an oil and gas field in the Dutch part of the North Sea off Den Helder. In the collision the bow of the Elsa Essberger was damaged, but the cargo tanks remained completely intact, so there is no danger of outflow or leakage of the cargo.

Dangers of Conflicting Actions in Collision Avoidance

The IMO issued Safety of Navigation Circular 226 entitled Dangers of Conflicting Actions in Collision Avoidance

Safety Alert - The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide Exposure

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert warning mariners of dangers posed by exposure to carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas produced as a by-product of diesel and gasoline engines and can accumulate quickly in confined spaces. Mariners are urged to ensure that exhaust systems on diesel and gasoline engines are properly vented away from accommodation, working, and recreational areas on vessels. (7/9/03). Source: HK Law

Raising Awareness of the Dangers of Confined Spaces

Analox Sensor Technology is calling for increased awareness of the potential dangers to anyone whose job requires them to work in confined spaces. Analox Sensor Technology specializes in gas sensors, detectors and alarms. “It is easy for oxygen levels to fall in confined spaces, or levels of toxic gases to rise,” said Managing Director Mark Lewis. “Without detection equipment, a person cannot know before entering such a space whether it is safe or not. The call for better awareness of the potential dangers follows an incident in which a water meter reader suffered severe brain damage. It was reported by IMCA, the International Marine Contractors Association. The meter reader entered a chamber approximately 1.8 meters deep to carry out a routine reading.

USCG Cutter Sinks Japanese Tsunami Derelict

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Anacapa has successfully sunk the derelict fishing vessel Ryou-Un Maru 180 miles west of the Southeast Alaskan coast. The Anacapa crew completed two gunnery evolutions shooting highly explosive ammunition into the vessel until it sank in 6,072 feet of water. “For the safety of mariners, sinking the vessel was the quickest way to properly address the danger this unattended vessel posed,” said Capt. Daniel Travers, Coast Guard District 17 Incident Manager. The Coast Guard worked closely with federal, state and local agencies to assess the immediate dangers the vessel presented and determined that sinking the vessel at sea would be the best course of action to help minimize any navigation and environmental threats.

State Urged to Replace Old Ferries

Maritime stakeholders in Mombasa have warned over stalled ferries at Likoni, Mombasa. They urged the government to check the condition of the vessels that dock at the Likoni channel to prevent a disaster. Stakeholders warned of the danger of collision between stalled ferries and ships, which use the Mombasa Port. Kenya Maritime Authority (KMA) said it would be difficult for a loaded oil tanker to break or drop anchor to avoid hitting a stalled ferry. The Mtongwe disaster, Kenya’s worst marine accident, where over 200 passengers died, should serve as a warning and jolt the authorities into action to avert similar disasters. Some Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) boats sail at over 40 knots along the Likoni channel and any ferry breaking down midstream posed danger to passengers.

Latest on 'Emma Maersk' Suez Incident

'Emma Maersk': Photo credit Maersk Line

Maersk Line’s largest container vessel, had an ingress of water into the engine room & terminated the voyage at Suez Container Terminal. According to a statement issued by Maersk, the vessel had just commenced its southbound voyage through the Suez Canal en route to Asia when water began flooding the engine room, and the captain decided to terminate the planned voyage and go alongside the nearby Suez Canal Container Terminal. The initial assessment is that the vessel was not at any time in any danger of sinking, nor was the crew at any time in danger. There are no signs of pollution.

Great Lakes Community Soon Treading on Thin Ice

US Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan advises of the dangers as increasingly warmer temperatures weaken ice. The Coast Guard warns that warmer temperatures present the possibility of extremely hazardous ice conditions throughout Lake Michigan, including Green Bay, Sturgeon Bay, Lake Winnebago, and other surrounding bodies of water and harbors. Recent trends suggesting decreased stability of ice reveal a danger to citizens ice fishing or transiting on the ice whether by foot or snowmobile. “With the arrival of spring, ice will begin to melt and the risk for people to fall through or become stranded on an ice floe greatly increases,” said Cmdr. Erik Leuenberger, Sector Lake Michigan search and rescue mission controller.

QinetiQ Launches ARKs for Hazardous Environments

QinetiQ recently launched a range of Appliqué Robotic Kits (ARKs) designed to convert the current in-service military JCB 4CXM or CAT320B families of vehicles into fully integrated remote controlled units for use in various hazardous environments in less that 12 hours, giving users control of the vehicle from as far as 1 km away. In addition, the ARKs are designed to allow existing vehicles to change between full remote or manual mode, thus reducing potential dangers to the operators but still enabling it to be fully used for tasks for which it was designed. The product is ideal for plant operators and drivers often placed in real danger when working in hazardous environments or involved with activities that deal with military operations…

QinetiQ Launches ARKs for Hazardous Environments

QinetiQ recently launched a range of Appliqué Robotic Kits (ARKs) designed to convert the current in-service military JCB 4CXM or CAT320B families of vehicles into fully integrated remote controlled units for use in various hazardous environments in less that 12 hours, giving users control of the vehicle from as far as 1 km away. In addition, the ARKs are designed to allow existing vehicles to change between full remote or manual mode, thus reducing potential dangers to the operators but still enabling it to be fully used for tasks for which it was designed. The product is ideal for plant operators and drivers often placed in real danger when working in hazardous environments or involved with activities that deal with military operations…

SCA Says Prestige Sinking Shows Danger

The Shipbuilding Council of America (SCA) says the sinking of the 26-year old tanker Prestige illustrates the danger of continued operation of single-hulled tank vessels. The accident should serve as a warning to shippers who continue to look for cheap alternatives to modern, double-hull tank vessels. SCA has long been warning of the dangers of continued operation of aged single-hull tank vessels. “Unfortunately, even in the U.S., companies continue to charter older, single-hull tankers similar to the sunken Prestige at discounted rates,” stated SCA President Allen Walker. No new product tankers are under construction or on order for the domestic trades. Only 21 product tankers in the U.S.-flag fleet are currently double-hulled and 10 of those vessels are more than 16 years old today.

SCA: Prestige Shows Danger of Single Hulls

The Shipbuilding Council of America (SCA) says the sinking of the 26-year old tanker Prestige illustrates the danger of continued operation of single-hulled tank vessels. The accident should serve as a warning to shippers who continue to look for cheap alternatives to modern, double-hull tank vessels. SCA has long been warning of the dangers of continued operation of aged single-hull tank vessels. "Unfortunately, even in the U.S., companies continue to charter older, single-hull tankers similar to the sunken Prestige at discounted rates," stated SCA President Allen Walker. No new product tankers are under construction or on order for the domestic trades. Only 21 product tankers in the U.S.-flag fleet are currently double-hulled and 10 of those vessels are more than 16 years old today.

Drydock Explosion Kills Five

An explosion on board the vessel Seamec II in the Curaçao ship repair company CDM killed five workers, the Daily Herald reported. The workers had made a hole in the hull of the offshore oil platform support vessel to remove a machine that required electronic work. As usual, the company’s chemist checked for possible gasses or other dangerous substances and gave the green light. What exactly happened is unclear, but the suspicion is that there was somehow a gas leak. The first explosion was followed by a second, and then a fire with a lot of smoke. The Fire Department had to deal with the smoke and the fact that the fire heated up the boat’s steel construction. There was also the risk of more explosions.

Greece Deploys Frigate to Stricken Rescue Ship

Greece has sent a frigate to rescue a container ship believed to carrying hundreds of undocumented migrants and in distress off its southern island of Crete, the Greek coastguard said on Tuesday. The Kiribati-flagged vessel, with about 700 people aboard, was sailing 30 nautical miles (55 km) southeast of Crete. The ship reported an engine problem in an area with strong winds. Four container ships sailing nearby could be called on to help if needed, a coastguard spokesman said. "There is no immediate danger, our priority is to save them if needed," he said. Greece is a popular entry point into Europe for thousands of undocumented migrants from Asia and Africa.

Hanjin Aqua Aground in Sunda Strait

Hanjin Aqua. Photo: Hanjin Shipping

The container ship  Hanjin Aqua (4,500-TEU) ran aground off Sangiang Island in Indonesia's Banten, Sundra Strait. The ship with 2303 containers on board is en route from Adelaide Australia to Jakarta, including hazardous cargo class A. Vessel (249m length overall and beam of 37m) has a portside list 3 degrees, grounded by bow part, hull is understood to be breached, details unclear. Indonesia patrol ships are on grounding site, crew remaining on board, as there is no danger of sinking. Local reports say that though the hull has breached, there is no danger of the ship sinking.

Shetland Coastguard Offer Sea Safety by Radio

96.2mhz. coastline. in case of an emergency to get help quickly. at Sea, to name but a few. Web address is: www.shetlandcoastguard.co.uk. The Maritime and Coastguard Agency are committed to Accident Prevention. activities. the numbers of people involved to grow over the next five years. potential dangers that can be minimised by a few simple precautions. being adopted, that can be readily understood by those at sea and on the shore.

New Zealand Warns Ships on Mir Breakup

New Zealand has issued international warnings to ships and aircraft travelling in the South Pacific area where Russia's Mir space station is due to break up next week. However, air and maritime safety officials say they don't expect shipping and air traffic to be at serious risk from debris falling into the watery "space junk graveyard". New Zealand is in charge of monitoring air and sea traffic in the splashdown area about 4,000 km (2,500 miles) east of the southern tip of New Zealand's South Island. Russian space officials have advised that 15-year-old Mir is expected to re-enter the atmosphere on Thursday, March 22, plus or minus one day, a senior Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) official said.

Environmentalists Critical of Draft IMO Polar Code

Arctic shipping: CCL File Photo

The new draft ‘Polar Code’ of safety and environmental rules, issued on 24, January 2014, fails to address the looming danger of having non ice-strengthened and poorly prepared ships in supposedly ‘ice-free’ polar waters, environmental organisations have warned. The final draft, drawn up by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), governs ships operating in Arctic and Antarctic waters. Increased shipping activity poses significant new threats to the polar environment and wildlife through oil spills, black carbon deposition, sewage discharges and the introduction of invasive species.

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History - April 13

1909- Cleveland, Ohio, Lake Erie. Two boys were unable to pull against the wind, were in danger of drifting on the breakwater. Life-saving crew at Cleveland went out, took the 2 boys in their power lifeboat, and towed their boat to East Ninth Street pier.   (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History - April 20

1871- Secretary of Treasury was authorized by Congress to employ crews of experienced surfmen at lifeboat stations at maximum rate of $40 per month, marking the end of the volunteer system. This was the beginning of direct Federal control over life-saving activities.   1997- Dikes along the Red River in North Dakota gave way causing dangerous floods. The Coast Guard responded to calls for assistance and rescued more than 200 people from danger.   (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)    

French Ferry Holed

A French ferry was badly holed in France's Channel harbor of Calais after being hurled onto the jetty by high winds, owners Sea-France said. No-one was injured on the ferry Monet which had sailed from the British port of Dover. Passengers and vehicles landed safely. Divers carried out emergency repairs and put in pumps to keep the ferry afloat. The company said it was not in danger of sinking but would remain in Calais for several weeks for repairs.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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