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Wednesday, July 18, 2018

General Dynamics Corp News

West Coast Maritime Action

While maritime activity showing renewed signs of life along the entire Pacific Coast, from Prince Rupert to San Diego, shipbuilding is becoming ever-more dependant on the US Navy and Jones Act ships, while ship-repair yards are focused on a broad spectrum of boats and ships. In California, some of that work has focused on re-powering harbor craft to meet the state’s stringent environmental regulations. Along the Columbia River, shipyards remain centered on meeting the on-going demand for ocean-going barges…

US Coast Guard Moves Forward on New Icebreakers

USCG photo by Rob Rothway

The U.S. Coast Guard released a proposed acquisition timeline and requirements for two new heavy U.S. icebreakers that could cost $1 billion each and said it would meet with interested companies during an industry day in March. Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft told an event hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies that notice was intended to get information from companies about their ability to build and develop icebreakers that would be in use for 40 years and to explore options such as leasing.

Electric Boats Look Bullish

Image: General Dynamics Electric Boat

General Dynamics Electric Boat expects to hire nearly 4,000 people in the coming years as it ramps up production on Navy submarines, the Associated Press reports. Electric Boat is projecting a positive outlook for 2016 for revenue and employment, saying 1,800 more workers will be hired at its facilities in Connecticut and Rhode Island this year. Electric Boat, a subsidiary of General Dynamics Corp., employs 14,100 people, mainly in Connecticut. By 2030, EB is projecting that number will grow to 18,000. Electric Boat president Jeffrey S.

US Navy: One Year Delay in Zumwalt Class Destroyers

General Dynamics Corp will deliver two Zumwalt-class destroyers a year later than planned, U.S. Navy officials said, blaming complications related to new technology. The Navy is adjusting its official baseline for the $22 billion DDG 1000 ship program to reflect the new delivery dates but the change will not trigger a mandatory review since the resulting cost increase will be under 15 percent, a defense official told Reuters, requesting anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the press. Navy spokeswoman Commander Thurraya Kent said the delays were mainly due to challenges with the integration, installation and testing of unique technology on the new class of warships.

Pentagon Chief Unveils Plans to Buy More High-end Ships

U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter (Photo: U.S. Department of Defense)

U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter on Wednesday mapped out plans for the U.S. Navy to buy more high-end submarines, destroyers, fighter jets and unmanned underwater vehicles using $8 billion in savings generated by scaling back orders for smaller Littoral Combat Ships. Carter said the Pentagon's five-year budget plan also included $2.9 billion to modify Raytheon Co's SM-6 missiles for use as powerful anti-ship weapons, and buy 625 more of the weapons, which are now used for missile defense.

General Dynamics Sees Good Year Ahead

According to a Dec. 2 report from Reuters, General Dynamics Corp (GD.N) expects flat defense spending in coming years, or possibly small declines, but does not foresee the kind of “precipitous" declines seen in early downturns. (Source: Reuters)

Skilled Workers Needed to Build Trump's Navy Vision

File Image: AdobeStock CREDIT Bogdan Vasilescu

U.S. President Donald Trump says he wants to build dozens of new warships in one of the biggest peace-time expansions of the U.S. Navy. But interviews with ship-builders, unions and a review of public and internal documents show major obstacles to that plan. The initiative could cost nearly $700 billion in government funding, take 30 years to complete and require hiring tens of thousands of skilled shipyard workers - many of whom don't exist yet because they still need to be hired and trained, according to the interviews and the documents reviewed. Trump has vowed a huge build-up of the U.S.

Huntington Ingalls CEO Urges Speedup of Next Amphib Ship Program

Mike Petters (Photo: HII)

Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc Chief Executive Mike Petters urged the U.S. Navy to accelerate its new LX(R) dock landing ship program to fiscal 2018 from 2020 to avoid significant costs associated with restarting a production line. The production-line gap would occur when building of the LPD-28 warship ends about two years before the LX(R) is due to start. Petters told Reuters the move would save money by averting a costly break in production of the ships, which the Navy has decided to base on the LPD-17 amphibious dock warships also built by Huntington Ingalls.

US Navy Warns Congress that Piecemeal Cruiser Upgrades Costly

U.S. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus on Thursday warned that congressional plans for a piecemeal modernization of 11 cruisers would cost billions of dollars more than the Navy's original plan and meant the warships would have to be retired earlier. "They will still be under the command of the CNO (Chief of Naval Operations). They will never go out of commission," he told reporters after a speech at the National Press Club. Mabus said the Navy remained in dialogue with Congress about the issue, and would gladly accept congressional language aimed at ensuring modernization was actually completed. For instance, he said Congress could impose financial penalties if the Navy reneged on the plan, or require it to sign contracts with U.S. shipyards for upgrade work.

US Navy: Fewer Ships and No funds for DD-X?

The U.S. Navy proposes to build four new ships in 2006, with no funding earmarked for the new DD-X destroyer being designed by Northrop Grumman Corp., Reuters reported. It appears that rising fuel costs, health care costs and Iraq war costs have effectively conspired to sap the navy budget. According to Reuters, it calls for the Navy to spend $6 billion in 2006 to build one of the two Northrop LPD-17 amphibious assault ships initially planned; one Littoral Combat Ship; one T-AKE logistic ship and one nuclear-powered Virginia-class attack submarine, both built by General Dynamics Corp. The Navy proposal, being evaluated by officials drafting the overall Pentagon budget…

Damaged US Warship Heads to San Diego for Repairs

USS Fort Worth (U.S. Navy photo by Joe Bishop)

The USS Fort Worth, a U.S. warship that suffered damage to its combining gears in Singapore in January, will travel to San Diego under its own power for extensive repairs at a General Dynamics Corp shipyard, the U.S. Navy said Wednesday. The new coastal warship, built by Lockheed Martin Corp , will use its gas turbine engines to travel to its homeport of San Diego this summer from Singapore, where it has been deployed since December 2014, the Navy's Pacific Fleet said in a statement. The trip is expected to take about six weeks.

Navy Awards LCS Contracts to General Dynamics and Lockheed

The Navy has awarded General Dynamics Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. the final design contracts that could lead to orders for the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). General Dynamics’ Bath Iron Work’s contract is worth $79M, and Lockheed’s is valued at $47M. The LCS is an entirely new breed of U.S. Navy warship. flexibility to ensure maritime dominance and access for the joint force. operate with focused-mission packages that deploy manned and unmanned vehicles to execute missions as assigned by Combatant Commanders. The Manitowoc Company, Inc.

General Dynamics Awarded 'Zumwalt-class' Superstructure Contract

Zumwalt-class under construction: Photo courtesy of USN

US Defense Department, Navy, has awarded General Dynamics Corp. -- Bath Iron Works Corp., Bath, Maine, a $212,000,000 fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract for the design and construction of a steel superstructure (deckhouse and hangar) plus construction of an aft peripheral vertical launching system for the Zumwalt-class destroyer (DDG 1002). Work will be performed in Bath, Maine (80.5 percent), Corona, Calif. (4.1 percent), Coatesville, Pa. (2.6 percent), South Portland…

General Dynamics Gets $270m Sub Procurement Pact

General Dynamics Electric Boat, a subsidiary of General Dynamics Corp., said it received a $270m pact modification from the U.S. Navy to buy long lead time material for the fiscal 2009 Virginia-class submarine SSN-784. The contract provides funding for steam and electric plant components, as well as mechanical and electrical systems components for the construction of the SSN-784 in fiscal 2009. General Dynamics said the work is expected to be completed by July 2011. The contract being modified was originally awarded in August 2003 and will be worth $8.8m, the company said.

General Dynamics to Build Third Mobile Landing Platform Ship

MLP Ship: Credit NASSCO

Third Mobile Landing Platform Ship for USN ordered from General Dynamics. According to Reuters, General Dynamics Corp has won a $360 million contract to build a third 765-foot-long Mobile Landing Platform ship - a kind of "pier at sea" - for the U.S. Navy. NASSCO informs that once delivered to the fleet, MLP ships will join Maritime Prepositioning Force squadrons that are strategically located around the world to enable rapid response in a crisis. MLP vessels will change the way the Maritime Prepositioning Force operates…

General Dynamics Tops Q2 Estimates

General Dynamics' NASSCO Shipyard (Photo: NASSCO/Ken Wright)

General Dynamics Corp, a maker of ships, tanks and business jets, reported higher-than-expected quarterly earnings and revenues on Wednesday, and sharply raised its outlook for full-year profit. Net profit increased 16.4 percent to $752 million for the second quarter from $646 million a year earlier. Earnings per share jumped over 20 percent to $2.27 a share from $1.88 a year earlier, while revenues rose 5.5 percent to $7.88 billion from $7.47 billion. Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S estimated second-quarter earnings of $678.65 million…

Navy Cancels DDG-1000 Destroyer Program

The Navy canceled DDG-1000 program .

The Secretary of the Navy informed members of the Senate and House of its plans to cancel the $29b DDG-1000 program after completion of the first two ships, one of which is scheduled to be completed at Bath Iron Works. Assembly work on the guided-missile destroyers was to have been divided between the 124-year-old shipyard, owned by General Dynamics Corp., and a yard in . Cancellation of the 14,000-ton, Zumwalt-class destroyer after just two ships were funded, was made public by Maine's two Republican senators, Olympia J. Snowe and Susan M. Collins, and US Representative Thomas H.

Rising Steel, Oil Prices Raise LCS Costs

Lockheed Martin Corp. says a double-digit jump in the cost of steel and rising oil prices have influenced the rise in the final price tag of its latest warship for the Navy to more than double the initial estimates. Navy officials last month told lawmakers the service's initial estimate of $220m per ship had ballooned to as much as $550 million, which they blamed on design changes that occurred during construction. While the cost of the first two Littoral combat ships--one each being built by Lockheed Martin and General Dynamics Corp.-- is not allowed to breach a congressional cost cap of $460 million per vessel, the ceiling does not apply to run-ups in inflation.

Obama Pushes for US Icebreakers

File Image: Polar Star - one of the U.S. Coast Guard's dwindling fleet of icebreakers.

President Barack Obama on Tuesday proposed a faster timetable for buying a new heavy icebreaker for the U.S. Arctic, where quickly melting sea ice has spurred more maritime traffic and the United States has fallen far behind Russian resources. The move, part of a push to convince Americans to support Obama's plans to curb climate change, has long been urged by Arctic advocates as climate change opens up the region to more shipping, mining and oil drilling. The announcement came as Obama heads to the coastal town of Seward…

U.S. Navy awards contracts to Lockheed, Austal for 4 more ships

File Photo: LCS hulls 4 & 6 alongside the pier at Austal Shipyard..

The U.S. Navy has awarded contracts worth nearly $1.4 billion to buy four more Littoral Combat Ships from Lockheed Martin Corp and Australia's Austal Ltd, the U.S. Defense Department said on Monday. Lockheed won a contract valued at $699 million to build two more of its steel monohull-design ships, while Austal won a contract worth $684 million to build two more of its aluminum trimaran design, the Pentagon said in its daily digest of major weapons contracts. Lockheed welcomed the contract…

US Navy Braces for Budget Cut Battles

USS Gerald Ford: Image credit NNS

Reuters –  Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert told reporters late on Monday that the Navy would have no choice but to curtail funding for a planned refueling of the nuclear-powered USS George Washington aircraft carrier if sharp cuts in military spending remained in effect for 2016 and beyond. Such a decision, he said, would have a big impact on the shipbuilding industrial base, noting that the refueling involved several hundred thousand man-days of work, and could affect the ability of carrier building Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc to build the next aircraft carrier.

US Navy Sees Competition for Next Amphibious Ship

LPD-17 (Photo courtesy: Huntington Ingalls)

The U.S. Navy will insist on competition for the next U.S. amphibious warship despite a decision last year to base the ship on the LPD-17 ship designed by Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc, Marine Corps Major General Robert Walsh said on Tuesday. Walsh, who is director of the U.S. Navy's Expeditionary Warfare Division, said the U.S. military owned the design for the LPD-17 class of ships and would launch a competition for the new warship program known as LX (R). "Competition drives down cost," Walsh said after a speech at the annual symposium of the Surface Navy Association.

US Could Reach 355 Ship Navy in 2030s -Official

The future littoral combat ship USS Indianapolis (LCS 17) is moved from an indoor production facility in Marinette, Wisc., to launchways in preparation for its April 14 launch into the Menomenee River. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Marinette Marine by Val Ihde)

The U.S. Navy could build its strength to 355 ships over a decade earlier than previously thought due to an increased shipbuilding budget and tempo as well as extending the service for some ships in the current fleet, a Pentagon official told a Congressional panel on Thursday. The goal of a larger Navy, one of President Donald Trump's signature issues from the campaign trail, could be achieved in the 2030s instead of the 2050s, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development & Acquisition, James Geurts told the U.S.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jul 2018 - Marine Communications Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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