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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Glover News

Willard Marine Hires New East Coast Director

David "Smokey" Glover

Willard Marine, Inc. announced Monday that David “Smokey” Glover will join its east coast Virginia Beach facility as Director of Operations. Glover’s career in the maritime industry dates back to 1974 when he completed a four-year apprenticeship as marine machinist for Norfolk Naval Shipyard. He went on to work as both a shipbuilder and operational manager with SUPSHIP Portsmouth and Bluewater Yacht Sales before dedicating 13 years to the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Combatant Craft Division (NSWC CCD) as a Mechanical Engineer Technician.

Ferry Co. Charged with Dumping Sewage

A company based in Marblehead was charged on Jan. 7 in federal court with dumping sewage into North Shore waters from a popular ferry it operates out of Salem. United States Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz, Rear Admiral J. L. Nimmich, United States Coast Guard, Commander, First Coast Guard District and William Schenkelberg, Special Agent in Charge of the Northeast Region of the Coast Guard Investigative Service, announced today that The Rockmore Company, Inc. was charged in a Criminal Information with two violations of the Rivers and Harbors Act arising out of its practice of dumping human waste into local waters. The Information alleges that, from 1990 to 2006, the company has operated a 59-ft long passenger vessel named the P/V Hannah Glover based in Salem.

Fast Ferry Study Enters New Phase

Kitsap Transit will pile sand and gravel on a few beaches in early fall to see how much a passenger-only ferry boat will take away. It’s part of the agency’s attempt to bring back the half-hour commuter run between Bremerton and Seattle. The study, which could begin in late September, is designed to measure the impact of ferry wakes left by a newly designed ferry. It also would determine whether renourishing an affected area is a viable way to repair ongoing beach damage from vessel wakes. For the study, sand and gravel approximating what’s already on each beach will be loaded onto the shores from barges during high tide, then graded at low tide. Most of the property owners affected by the new material already have given their approval for the test, Hayes said.

State Maritime Employees Barred from Jones Act Suit

The Supreme Court of the State of Alaska ruled that a state-employed seaman injured on job may not recover against the state for alleged personal injuries in an action under the federal Jones Act. In the instant case, plaintiff was employed as a crew member on an Alaska state ferry. He was allegedly injured while working when the vessel was underway. When the state handled the injury under the state’s worker’s compensation system, plaintiff brought a declaratory judgment action in state court, asserting that the state law asserting sovereign immunity in these type cases violated the Alaska Constitution and the United States Constitution.

Washington Court Will Not Hear Alaska Dispute

The Court of Appeals of the State of Washington affirmed the dismissal of a lawsuit on the basis of comity. In the instant case, plaintiff seaman was allegedly injured while working as a crew member on an Alaska state ferry. When the state started handling the injury as a workmen’s compensation issue in accordance with state law, plaintiff filed a declaratory judgment action in Alaska state court. After losing at the trial level, plaintiff appealed in Alaska and brought this separate action in Washington State seeking recovery against the State of Alaska under the federal Jones Act. The Washington appellate court noted that the dispute arose in Alaska, is based on Alaska law, and is being separately litigated in Alaska.

New Strathclyde Marine Institute, Glasgow

Photo courtesy University of Strathclyde

A new institute dedicated to pioneering research and technology for the marine sector has been launched at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow. Scotland's Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor Anne Glover, met with researchers from the institute, which aims to contribute to the UK's marine economy by providing industry and government with cutting-edge research into marine energy, the environment and transport. The Strathclyde Marine Institute will combine expertise from the fields of engineering…

Study at Cleveland Port Reveals Options

The Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port Authority has received a capacity study identifying options for sustaining the Port's position as an engine for manufacturing jobs, while the City of Cleveland is opening up the lakefront for greater public access and economic development. The study's main finding was that as the Port vacates key docks and storage areas, then those maritime facilities would need replacement given any reasonable future business projection. The Port of Cleveland is a destination port, meaning it produces local jobs because 90 percent of the Port's cargo is produced or consumed within a 75-mile radius. For example, the Cleveland Cliffs iron ore brought here from Minnesota by Oglebay Norton is used for manufacturing steel at ISG.

Northeast Maritime Shiphandling Contest

Northeast Maritime Institute (NMI) has announced plans to hold a competition that will identify the world’s most skilled ship handlers. The competition, to be held June 5 to June 7, 2009 in Fairhaven, Mass. will offer a total of $50,000 in prizes to the top three contestants. The International Shiphandling Championship will challenge contestants to demonstrate their skills in handling four different vessel types ranging in size from modern tugs to large containerships. Participants will face challenging ship handling scenarios on Northeast Maritime Transas simulators. First prize will be $30,000, second will be $15,000, and third will be $5,000.

ASCE to Release New Report Detailing Trade Impacts

ASCE to Release New Report Detailing Trade Impacts of Failing to Invest in America’s Seaports/Inland Waterways. The nation’s seaports and inland waterways are critical links that make commerce possible. With the expansion of the Panama Canal by 2015, these facilities require rapid modernization. Recognizing this, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) will unveil a new economic study on THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13th at 10 AM. The study measures the impacts on jobs, GDP and other economic indicators if the nation fails to meet the investment needs of our ports infrastructure on our national economy. Attendees can RSVP by emailing rsvp@gpgdc.com. The nation’s ports facilitate international trade, a significant driver of growth in the U.S. economy.

Arctic Ice Sets New Record Low for Winter

Photo: NOAA

The extent of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has set a new record low for the wintertime in a region strongly affected by long-term trends of global warming, U.S. and European scientists said on Wednesday. Sea ice around the North Pole expands to its biggest extent of the year in February or March after a deep freeze in the winter polar darkness and shrinks to the smallest of the year in September, at the end of the brief Arctic summer. Arctic sea ice appears to have reached its annual maximum extent on March 7…

U.S. Navy To Pay Cheney's Utility Bill?

The White House is asking the U.S. Navy to pay the six-figure utility bill for Vice President Dick Cheney's house, as Democrats accused Cheney, the administration's point man on energy policy, of "staggering insensitivity." The bill for electricity, gas and water for the 33-room official vice presidential residence at the U.S. Naval Observatory is projected at $136,000 for fiscal 2002 which ends in September, compared with a budget of $43,600, the White House said. The bills have far outstripped the budget since an electricity meter was installed in 1998, the White House said. This has driven Cheney to practice the energy conservation…

Vibration Mitigation on Fast Craft

The professional maritime sector recognizes the need to reduce the effects of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) but this is not a straightforward process for those operating planing craft. These vessels can expose crews and passengers to high levels of repeated shock and vibration which has been shown to increase the risk of injury. In flat sea conditions there is vibration from the engine, gearbox and shaft but the crew and passengers are not exposed to harmful vibration. All fast boat operators know that waves change everything.

Brazil Shipbuilding: A Forecast

The rise and fall of the Brazilian shipbuilding market is well-known, having plummeted from the top of the world list in the early 1980s to the bottom by 1999. Today, Brazil is storming back, an amazing revival of the nearly defunct shipbuilding industry driven by the sudden influx of orders from major offshore oil & gas players, namely Petrobras. Today the shipbuilding market in Brazil has in excess of 100 firm orders for ships in a variety of shapes and sizes, in addition to a large number of drill rigs and production unit orders.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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