Marine Link
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Hard Hat News

Halifax Shipyard to Modernize Frigates

A sea of people in hard hats flooded a tent Monday at the Halifax Shipyard for the announcement of $549m worth of work on the navy’s Halifax-class frigates. Seven of the warships will go through a modernization program at the Irving-owned shipyard. also announced a $351-million contract Monday with Victoria Shipyards on the West Coast to upgrade the other five frigates.   Source:  Chronicle Herald

Crewman Overboard Near Texas

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and the crew of a nearby ship are searching for a crewman who fell overboard while painting the side of a bulk carrier at anchor about 10 miles off Sabine Pass, Texas, Saturday. The crew of the CF Crystal, a Chinese-flagged 738-foot bulk carrier, contacted Coast Guard Sector Houston/Galveston watchstanders at about 9 a.m. Saturday, to report a crewman had fallen overboard. The crew reportedly threw the man a life ring but couldn't reach him, and they saw him submerge shortly after. The USCG dispatched a Station Sabine Pass 45-foot rescue boatcrew, which arrived on scene within 30 minutes and began searching. A MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station Houston was also sent to join the search.

Implementing an Effective Personal Protective Equipment Program

Some of the newest OSHA regulations impacting the shipyard industry deal with Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE). When this set of standards was first published, many questioned the need for them - after all, how complicated are hardhats, safety glasses or steel-toe boots? At first glance, a PPE program does not seem very complex or difficult to implement; however, I have found this is a consistently deficient area in the safety audits I have performed. When I visit workplaces, I often find inappropriate PPE is being used or PPE is not being used at all. The identification of the appropriate PPE associated with a particular task or job classification is the first step in an effective PPE program.

Phillies to Be Honored at Keel-Laying

On October 12, workers at Aker Philadelphia Shipyard, just down Broad Street from the home of the Phillies, will sport baseball caps in addition to their traditional hard hats as they pay tribute to the World Champions and their trademark blue-collar work ethic when the yard holds the milestone keel-laying as it begins assembly of its 10th in a series of ocean going product tankers. Members of the 1,200-strong shipyard crew, who have distinguished themselves for their Phils-like precision and teamwork, will show their support for co-workers and the Phillies as the structurally-critical, 620-ton keel section is lowered into place. In keeping with ship-building tradition…

American Club has New Principal Surveyor

John Poulson, vice president, principal surveyor

John Poulson Rejoins Management Team. Well-known surveyor John Poulson, a highly-experienced former mariner, is rejoining the American P&I Club’s management team on February 1 as vice president, principal surveyor and head of the survey and technical department. He worked with the club’s managers for several years in the middle of the last decade before moving to GL Noble Denton (as it is now), New York, where he had oversight and responsibility for that company’s operations throughout the Americas.

Carrier's Namesake Tests Catapult

Former President George H.W. Bush, prepares to signal the launch of two "dead loads" off the flight deck of the Precommissioning Unit (PCU) George H. W. Bush's (CVN 77). "Dead Load" launches test the ship's catapult systems ability to launch aircraft. The ship is under construction at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard. U.S. From Pre-Commissioning Unit George H. Marking a milestone in the construction of the U.S. Navy's newest aircraft carrier, Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) George H.

DDG100 Keel Authenticated

U.S. here today. The event featured brief remarks delivered by Isaac C. Trade for Northrop Grumman's Electronic Systems sector. the grandson of the ship's namesake, U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Kidd, (1884-1941), and son of U.S. Navy Adm. Isaac C. (1920-1999). ceremony. In welcoming the Kidd family to the shipyard, Dr. Philip A. great milestone in shipbuilding. the Congressional Medal of Honor in World War II. killed in action was Adm. Isaac C. Kidd. said Cappy Kidd. there wearing those hard hats. breathe life into that which will carry our family name. Adm.

MDSU-2 Aids in Minneapolis Bridge Recovery

Navy Diver 1st Class Josuha Harsh of Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 from Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek, Va., surfaces after completing a salvage dive in the Mississippi River as the vehicle he and his team rigged is lifted from the water. MDSU-2 is assisting other federal, state, and local authorities managing disaster and recovery efforts at the site. U.S. Navy divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 from Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek are bringing unique expeditionary diving and salvage capabilities to the search and recovery efforts at the site of the I-35 bridge collapse. MDSU-2 divers and a command and control element that includes representatives from Naval Sea Systems Command and Underwater Construction Team (UCT) 1 have been in Minneapolis since Aug.

Sailors’ Society Woolly Hat Week to Aid Seafarers

Lloyd’s Register, sponsors of Sailors’ Society’s Woolly Hat Week, will be donning their woolly hats and holding a #HatHero collection to raise funds for seafarers and their families. (Photo: Sailor's Society)

Press release - Sailors’ Society is encouraging supporters to be a #HatHero this Woolly Hat Week to raise awareness of the challenges seafarers face daily and to help seafarers in need. Sponsored by Lloyd’s Register, this Woolly Hat Week will be held February 14-21. You can lend your support by wearing a woolly hat to work, donating to Sailors’ Society and tweeting a selfie to #HatHero @SailorsSociety. “Seafarers can be away from home for up to a year at a time braving freezing temperatures and dangerous seas to deliver 90 per cent of our goods. So, in our eyes, seafarers are real heroes.

Woolly Hat Campaign for Mission to Seafarers

Patrick Silla and Jos Standerwick Photo Mission to Seafarers

Following last year’s successful Woolly Hat Day, The Campaign for Wool is once again urging those up and down the country to wear wool to raise money for The Mission to Seafarers on the 14th October as part of Wool Week 2016. With support from shops, schools and businesses this year’s Woolly Hat Day hopes to raise £15, 000 to support the Mission’s important work in assisting seafarers and their families across the world in times of great difficulty. Welcoming the renewed collaboration between the Mission and The Campaign for Wool…

Lean Manufacturing Transforms Maker of US Navy Warships

Photo: Fincantieri Marinette Marine

Big investments, lean manufacturing techniques borrowed from the automotive industry, and a more engaged workforce have revamped the Wisconsin shipyard where Italy's Fincantieri SpA builds the Freedom variant of the U.S. Navy's coastal warships for prime contractor Lockheed Martin Corp. Fincantieri invested $100 million in recent years to transform the 1940s era shipyard into a state-of-the-art facility, where seven LCS ships are now under construction, including three that have already been launched into the river.

19th Century Shipwreck Found off Golden Gate Bridge

2013 Multi-beam sonar profile view of the shipwreck SS City of Chester (Credit: NOAA Office of Coast Survey NRT6)

NOAA announced it has found the underwater wreck of the passenger steamer City of Chester, which sank in 1888 in a collision in dense fog near where the Golden Gate Bridge stands today. The announcement was made during a press event at Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary’s San Francisco headquarters at Crissy Field. NOAA’s predecessor agency first located ship in 1890, two years after it sank. The story of City of Chester will be shared with the public in a future waterfront exhibit NOAA will place at the sanctuary office at Crissy Field. The office is the former U.S.

Woolly Hat Week Inspires Knitting Frenzy

The Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society Supports Campaign to Help Sailors. Sailors are renowned for spinning a good yarn, however on this occasion it is a volunteer at the land-locked Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society who has been getting busy with her knitting needles to make hats for mariners as part of Woolly Hat Week (6-13 Feb). Maureen Phillips has spearheaded a knitting frenzy at the care home, which provides dedicated accommodation and care to former seafarers, and has already produced 15 hats which will be given as gifts to sailors who arrive as strangers in ports all over the world.

Rigdon Christens and Delivers Hat Trick

Rigdon Marine Corporation (RMC), announced the christening and delivery of the Hat Trick in  Christina Teague, wife of John Teague, RMC’s Vice President of QHSE christened the seventh of ten Rigdon 4000 Class vessel with the traditional champagne against the bow. Upon delivery, the Hat Trick was deployed on a term contract to an oil major in the U.S. GOM. The Hat Trick is a 190 x 46  x 18-ft., diesel electric, DP-2 PSV, which features a capacity of 4,000 barrels of liquid mud in an oval, self cleaning, segregated tank system. The PSV will also include three (3) x Z-Drives and two large forward tunnel thrusters. The Rigdon 4000 Class PSVs are capable of serving a wide array of marine applications in all water depths.

Panama Canal's Locks Stand Test Of Time

The man-made chasm, large enough to swallow the Titanic whole, yawns before him. To reach the bottom takes an elevator, a hard hat and no fear of heights. But for Ivan Lasso, superintendent of the Panama Canal's Pacific locks, entering the void is all in a day's work. The huge 85-year-old lock chambers need a routine overhaul. When the locks were hand-poured in 1913, they were the largest reinforced concrete structures ever, allowing engineers to dream up skyscrapers they would later build in Manhattan. Tall as a six-story building, the 700-ton riveted steel Miter gates - 88 in all in the 50-mile (82 km) canal's three flights of locks - established Pittsburgh as a steel town.

Deaths & Injuries During Mooring Increasing

Serious accidents in mooring operations involving death or serious injury appear to be increasing over the long term, according to the UK P&I Club. The Club finds it has spent over $34m settling related insurance claims over the past 20 years. The numbers rarely exceeded four per cent of all claims on the Club and two per cent of settlements in 1987-97. During the next decade, however, the number peaked at 14 per cent in 2000 and the value at 15 per cent two years later. In 2007, both numbers and values dropped to 1997 levels. Mooring injuries have been only the seventh most frequent cause of personal injuries dealt with by the Club but the third most expensive per claim, indicating that these injuries are often more severe. Some 14 per cent of all accidents involved deaths.

BP Ships Second Containment Dome to Gulf Spill Site

According to a May 11 report from Reuters, BP Plc said it has finished building a smaller dome designed to trap oil spewing from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico and plans to try placing it over the relentless leak. This "top hat" dome was taken out to sea by ship from Port Fourchon in southeastern Louisiana, where it was made. Robotic submarines will then make preparations before the containment structure is put into place. (Source: Reuters)  

New Improved Estimate of Oil Spill Flow Rate

Based on updated information and scientific assessments, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, and Chair of the National Incident Command’s Flow Rate Technical Group (FRTG) Dr. Marcia McNutt (Director of the U.S. Geological Survey) today announced an improved estimate of how much oil is flowing from the leaking BP well. Secretary Chu, Secretary Salazar, and Dr. McNutt convened a group of federal and independent scientists on Monday to discuss new analyses and data points obtained over the weekend to produce updated flow rate estimates. Working together, U.S. government and independent scientists estimate that the most likely flow rate of oil today is between 35,000 and 60,000 barrels per day.

Danish Submarine-owner Charged with Abusing Journalist before Killing Her

File photo: Peter Madsen operates submarine UC3 Nautilius in August 2008. (Photo: Frumperino)

Danish inventor Peter Madsen tied up and abused Swedish journalist Kim Wall before murdering her on board his home-built submarine, according to the indictment published on Tuesday. Madsen planned the murder by bringing items, including a saw and screwdrivers, which were used to hit, cut and stab Wall while she was alive, the prosecutors said. Wall, a 30-year-old freelance journalist who was researching a story on the entrepreneur and aerospace engineer, went missing after Madsen took her out to sea in his 17-metre (56-foot) submarine in August last year.

Everett College to Launch New Research Boat

Phocoena (Photo courtesy of Everett Community College)

Everett Community College’s Ocean Research College Academy (ORCA) will launch its new research vesel on November 22 with a celebration at 11 a.m. at the Port of Everett. The dedication of the Phocoena (the scientific name for harbor porpoise, pronounced FOE see nuh) will happen at the port’s travel lift, located in front of ORCA’s classrooms at 1205 Craftsman Way in Everett. The 36-foot Phocoena was funded by a $218,000 grant from the National Science Foundation and built by Bean Custom Marine Fabrication.

Coast Guard to Appoint New Ancient Mariners

Furling sails barque 'Eagle': USCG photo

The Ancient Mariner title established in 1978 recognizes the officer and enlisted person with the earliest designation as a permanent cutterman and requires a minimum of ten years of sea time. A change-of-watch ceremony for the U.S. Coast Guard Gold and Silver Ancient Mariners is scheduled to take place aboard Barque'Eagle at 10 a.m. Friday, May 2, 2014. The Gold (Officer) Ancient Mariner designation will pass from Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp to Rear Adm. Fred Midgette…

St. Lawrence Seaway Opens Shipping Season Today

The St. Lawrence Seaway will open its 54th annual international shipping season today. The first vessel to transit the Welland Canal as part of the opening ceremony will be the Wilf Seymour/Alouette Spirit from McKeil Marine. The event will include the annual "top hat" ceremony - a tradition since 1947, where a top hat is presented to the captain of the season's first vessel. Indiana's first international ship is tentatively scheduled to arrive at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor on April 7. The MV Isadora, a Polsteam vessel, is traveling from Ijmuiden, Netherlands. "The opening of the locks on the St. Lawrence Seaway allows the flow of international trade to and from the Great Lakes ports," said Peter Laman, port director at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor.

Sonetics Launches Trade-Up Program

Sonetics Launches Wireless Made Easy Trade-Up Program to Provide Reliable Team Communications for Users of Legacy Wired Systems. Sonetics has announced the Wireless Made Easy Trade-up Program for users of legacy wired headsets. The program offers credits up to $150 per wired headset redeemed towards the purchase of completely wireless Apex and Triton headsets providing a cost-effective transition to wireless benefits while upgrading from David Clark, Peltor, Piratecom, Avcom and other legacy systems. Millions of headset users remain tethered to intercom systems, repeatedly repairing unreliable decades-old wired equipment at substantial ongoing cost.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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