Marine Link
Thursday, January 18, 2018

Issues Safety News

Dangers of Conflicting Actions in Collision Avoidance

The IMO issued Safety of Navigation Circular 226 entitled Dangers of Conflicting Actions in Collision Avoidance

MSO Issues Safety Bulletin

USCG Marine Safety Office (MSO) New Orleans issued a Marine Safety Bulletin reminding mariners to exercise extreme caution during the high water levels currently experienced on the Mississippi and other rivers. Caution is particularly called for during fleeting operations and transits of narrow passages, such as bridges.

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert following a recent fireon a product tanker. The Safety Alert recommends that personnel ensure the proper maintenance and repair of fuel and exhaust systems associated with main propulsion and diesel-driven auxiliaries onboard their vessels. The engines should be maintained as designed, except for authorized modifications. Insulation of potential fuel oil ignition sources and use of specialized fasteners and other devices to reduce the loosening of critical engine and systems components is essential.

This Day in Coast Guard History – August 13

1954-Congress passed Public Law 584, resulting in the Coast Guard relinquishing to the Federal Communications Commission the responsibility for issuing safety radiotelegraphy and safety radiotelephony certificates and exemption certificates under the International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea. 1967-CGC Sweetbriar and CGC Cape Coral came to the rescue of Alaska Governor Walter J. Hickel and his fishing party after they began trapped in a cove by a heavy storm.  The cutters escorted the fishing party safely back to Juneau. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The US Coast Guard Office of Investigations and Analysis issued a Safety Alert advising that certain emergency escape hoods manufactured by Brookdale International Systems, Inc. are being voluntarily recalled by that company. Even though such devices are not Coast Guard approved, they are carried on some vessels. Companies that have such devices on their ships should contact the manufacturer at http://www.evacsafety.com to determine whether your particular item is subject to the recall. source: HK Law

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The U.S. Coast Guard Office of Investigations and Analysis issued a Safety Alert stating that certain “Strike First” fire extinguishers are being recalled. The fire extinguishers are the 2.5 and 5 pound dry chemical type. The valve stem seats on a number of these assembled between December 2002 and February 2004 may prevent the extinguisher from discharging properly when the lever is activated. Retro-fit kits are available free of charge from the manufacturer. Source: HK Law

Coast Guard Issues Safety Zone ex-USS Oriskany

The US Coast Guard issued a press relase stating that it is enforcing a safety zone around the ex-USS ORISKANY as the obsolete aircraft carrier is towed into waters of the Gulf of Mexico near Pensacola where it will be scuttled to create the largest artificial reef in history. Source: HK Law

CG Issues Safety Alert for Faulty Liferaft

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert stating that servicing of some inflatable liferafts by AMPAK facilities in Baton Rouge (Louisiana) and Panama City (Florida) may not have been proper. Work has been found in some instances to be improper and tests in some instances were not actually performed. The AMPAK facilities were not authorized by the U.S. Coast Guard to service liferafts. The AMPAK facilities have apparently ceased operations. Inflatable liferafts serviced at these AMPAK facilities should be taken to an approved servicing facility as soon as possible. If possible, the U.S. Coast Guard should be notified as it would like to witness the servicing.

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert stating that a chemical tanker recently suffered a tank explosion in the Gulf of Mexico near Galveston. After stripping a tank, the tankerman opened the tank top cover and an explosion ensued, injuring the tankerman and damaging the vessel. While the investigation is ongoing, the cause appears to be that the bearings in the cargo pump failed, allowing the shaft and impeller to shift and spin against the casing. The friction caused extreme heat and possible sparks, which ignited the atmosphere in the tank. Owners and operators are advised to ensure proper maintenance of cargo pumps. Source: HK Law

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The U.S. Coast Guard has issued a Safety Alert reporting that the Ikaros model Mark II Man-Overboard Smoke Signal may explode if the igniter mechanism is reinserted after ignition has commenced. The device is designed to automatically ignite when pulled from its bracket. It is used with a number of ring lifebuoys and is generally detached when the lifebuoy is deployed. Owners and operators should consider replacing the model Mark II with the new model Mark III, which includes a pressure relief mechanism to prevent explosion due to pressure build-up. In the meantime, owners and operators are encouraged to install warning placards advising crewmembers to not return the smoke signal to its bracket following ignition. Source: HK Law

BSEE Issues Guidance for Workplace Safety Rule

The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) today issued a Notice to Lessees (NTL) that provides further guidance on the previously issued Safety and Environmental Management System (SEMS) rule. The SEMS rule, also referred to as the Workplace Safety Rule, is designed to reduce the likelihood of accidents, injuries and spills that occur in connection with offshore oil and gas exploration and development activities on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The NTL consolidates guidance and information to help operators comply with the requirements of the rule. Operators are required to implement a SEMS program by November 15, 2011.

NTSB Determines Pilot’s Maneuvering Error in 2006 Accident

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) determined that the probable cause of the grounding of the New Delhi Express was the error of the docking pilot in not using all available resources to determine the vessel's position as he navigated the Kill Van Kull waterway. Contributing to the cause of the grounding was the failure of both pilots to practice good bridge resource management. "This accident could have been prevented if previously issued safety recommendations regarding bridge resource management had been implemented," said NTSB Chairman Mark V. Rosenker. On April 15, 2006, the container ship New Delhi Express arrived at the entrance of New York Harbor after a transatlantic voyage. Aboard the vessel were a master, 21 crewmembers, three passengers, and a Sandy Hook pilot.

Canada Unveils New Arctic Shipping Safety Regulations

Photo: Transport Canada

Canada's Arctic is a vast and diverse region that is an integral part of this country. Marine transportation in the Arctic connects Canada to other countries and provides an essential lifeline for northern communities. To uphold the Government of Canada's high standards for marine shipping in the north, Transport Canada has introduced new Arctic Shipping Safety and Pollution Prevention Regulations. The regulations incorporate the International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (the Polar Code) into Canada's domestic legislation.

Focus on Safety Pays Off for SCA Member Shipyards

Injury and illness rates at shipyards that belong to the Shipbuilders Council of America (SCA) have declined over the past three years helping facilities to drastically their overhead costs. The average Total Recordable Incident Rates (TRIR) for SCA member facilities declined from 12.94 percent in 1998 to 11.76 percent in 2001, while the average TRIR for the industry as a whole (SIC 3731) as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) was 20.2 percent in 1999 and 22 percent in 2000. SCA’s data is based on the quarterly injury and illness surveys calculated by the Council. SCA has an active safety committee that reviews the results of each quarterly survey and holds bi-annual safety seminars to address the areas where most injuries occur.

Safety Pays Off for SCA Shipyards

Injury and illness incident rates at shipyards that belong to the Shipbuilders Council of America (SCA) have, for the fifth consecutive year, stayed below the industry average. to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). SCA has an active Safety Committee that reviews the results of each quarterly survey and holds bi-annual safety seminars to address the areas where most injuries occur. naval shipyards and the importance of worker orientation programs. annual safety record. number of hours worked. average are eligible for awards. Industries, Inc., headquartered in Morgan City, LA. had a TRIR below the association’s average.

BOEMRE Seeking Accident Investigation Board Chief

WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) today announced it is seeking to fill a senior position in the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), one of the two agencies that will replace the former Minerals Management Service on Oct. 1, 2011. The position is being filled now to ensure a smooth transition. This position will serve as the Chief of the Accident Investigation Board, and will be located in the bureau’s office in Herndon, Va.

Shell Marine Issues Safety @ Heart Award

Pictured is Sheamus Keehan and Marco Galizioli, Manager Americas, Operation Technical HS&E, SMP U.S. present Shell’s “Safety @ Heart” Award plaque to Pat Studdert, Pres., Buffalo Marine Service, Inc., Houston. Shell Marine Products recognized Buffalo Marine Service, Inc., Houston when they announced Buffalo as the recipient of Shell’s “Safety @ Heart” Award (2004) in the ‘Best Barge Contractor” category. The nomination and selection was worldwide in scope. Mr. Michiel Kool, Chief Executive Officer…

Industry Asks IMO to Require Weighing of Containers

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has received a formal proposal co-sponsored by a broad array of industry organizations, labor, and governments to require loaded containers to be weighed to determine their actual weight. The proposal was submitted by Denmark, The Netherlands, the United States, BIMCO, the International Association of Ports and Harbors (IAPH), the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF), and the World Shipping Council (WSC).

MAN OVERBOARD Prevention & Recovery Workshop

The 2018 MAN OVERBOARD Prevention & Recovery Workshop is being held at the Grand Harbour, Southampton, U.K. on April 17. All sectors are invited to participate in this unique one day event that focuses on viable solutions. Knowledge gained about the deadly risks of people falling in the water from recent incidents with sub IMO / sub 24 meter vessels is becoming increasingly relevant to vessels of all sizes. Workshop organizer, John Haynes, said, “Topics focus on visible issues today, plus hidden areas of concern the professional maritime sector may need to face tomorrow.

Containers Overboard; Response Continues

Barge container ship, Columbia Elizabeth, is towed to Port of Palm Beach, Dec. 6, 2015. While enroute to Puerto Rico, several cargo containers fell overboard off the coast of Port Canaveral, Fla. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

The U.S. Coast Guard said it continues to respond to the loss of containers from the barge Columbia Elizabeth, which reported losing multiple containers into the sea between Cape Canaveral and Palm Beach, Florida, Sunday. Marine prevention teams from Coast Guard Sector Miami and Marine Safety Detachment Lake Worth have been dispatched to the Port of Palm beach where the barge is currently being unloaded, according to the Coast Guard. As of Tuesday afternoon, crews have removed 243 containers from the barge at the Port of Palm Beach.

NTSB Issues Safety Recommendation on Lifesaving Equipment

The National Transportation Safety Board is urging the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) to inspect certain lifesaving equipment that might not operate properly when needed. The urgent safety recommendations are the result of information learned by the NTSB during its investigation of the Empress of the North grounding earlier this year. The Board has identified deficiencies in liferaft release units and evacuation slides. The Safety Board regards the issues as serious enough to issue urgent safety recommendations in advance of the final accident report. On May 14, 2007, the passenger vessel Empress of the North grounded at the intersection of Lynn Canal and Icy Straits, about 20 miles southwest of Juneau, Alaska, after the vessel failed to negotiate a turn to the west.

Jamaica Strives to Reduce Death at Sea

Captain Steven Spence (Photo: Jamaica Ship Registry)

Jamaica is backing a pledge by the Secretary General of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to half the number of lives lost at sea by 2015. Mr. Koji Sekimizu has made reducing maritime casualties a key aim of his term of office. IMO figures put the number of lives lost at sea in 2012 at approximately 1,000, including 500 in international shipping. Rear Admiral Peter Brady, Director General of the Maritime Authority of Jamaica, said, “We fully endorse the Secretary General’s aims and will do all we can to assist him to achieve his target.

First Containership Receives LR Cyber Notation

COSCO Aries (Photo: COSCO Shipping)

The newly built containership MV COSCO Shipping Aries, recently delivered to COSCO Shipping Lines, is the first ever containership to receive Lloyd’s Register’s (LR) cyber-enabled ship (CES) descriptive note “Cyber AL3 SECURE PERFORM” for its energy management system. The 20,000 TEU ship was built by Nantong COSCOS KHI Ship Engineering Co., Ltd (NACKS). “MV COSCO Shipping Aries is the first 20K TEU level ultra large containership built in Chinese shipyard owned by COSCO Shipping Container Lines.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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