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Monday, January 22, 2018

Lagoon News

Venice 'Blue Flag' Accord Signed

San Marco from the Lagoon: Photo credit Wikimedia CCL

Cruise ships agree to adopt the strictest measures to reduce air pollution when entering Italy's Venice Lagoon. The agreement, known as “Venice Blue Flag II,” commits cruise lines to operate the main and auxiliary engines of their ships with marine fuel with sulphur content of no more than 0.1% (lower than the EU guidelines, which recently set restrictions at 0.5%) immediately upon passing the Lido harbour entrance and while travelling through the Lagoon’s marine canals. It also…

ABB to Play Role in Protecting Venice

Venice & Lagoon Inlets:Image courtesy of NASA

ABB’s Symphony Plus control system to help protect Venice from high water flooding at the long Venetian Lagoon Malamocco inlet. Every four years or so, text messages, church bells and sirens alert the Venetians to what they call an "Aqua Alta" or the imminent arrival of an exceptionally high tide. These are high waters of more than 140 cm, which cover around 54 percent of the city. More frequent, but no less worrying, are high tides of around 110 cm, which occur up to four times a year…

Molasses Spill Kills Fish in Honolulu Harbor

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed that the brown substance that is contaminating much of Honolulu Harbor and Keehi Lagoon and is the apparent cause of death for many marine animals, is molasses that spilled into the harbor from a pipeline under Pier 52. The public is advised not to enter the ocean if they notice a brown color in the water. The plume of dark water is moving with the tides and currents from Honolulu Harbor into the Keehi Lagoon. From the lagoon, it is expected to dissipate into the ocean. DOH also advises the public not to consume any of the dead fish that may be found in the area. In response to the spill…

Ivory Coast Urban Water Transport Opened to Outside Investors

Ivory Coast abolished a state monopoly on passenger traffic on the lagoon surrounding the commercial capital Abidjan, the government announced on Wednesday, clearing the way for outside investors. Abidjan, a city of around 6 million inhabitants, straddles the Ebrie Lagoon. The SOTRA urban transportation company, majority-owned by the state with a minority interest held by Italian bus manufacturer Iveco, runs several water-taxi lines. Government spokesman Bruno Kone said the waterways had been under-utilized. "This will allow other entities to make major investments," Bruno said after a cabinet meeting. He also announced the approval of an agreement between the transportation ministry and Rainbow Ferry Lines…

ABB To Help Save Venice From the Sea

Barriers Venice Photo ABB

ABB to deliver advanced integrated automation and electrical solution for largest Italian public work project of the last century. ABB will supply the complete integrated electrical and automation system for Mo.S.E. (the Italian acronym for experimental electro mechanic module), a flood barrier system designed to block the high tides and storm surges that enter the Venetian Lagoon year after year through three inlets and regularly flood the historic center of Venice. ABB received the automation order in 2015 and the electrical order in early 2016.

NAVSEA Takes Lead in Repairing Oil Leak from Sunken Ship

Divers from Mobile Underwater Diving Salvage Unit (MUDSU) 1 based at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, will soon descend into a Pacific lagoon to stop a recent oil leak and assess the material condition of a World War II Navy oil tanker that sank in 1944. USS Mississinewa (AO 59), a 553-foot auxiliary oiler, was commissioned May 18, 1944, and supported the ships of the 3rd Fleet in the Central and South Pacific. The huge lagoon at Ulithi Atoll was an anchorage for hundreds of Pacific Fleet ships and major staging area for campaigns at Leyte Gulf, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Mississinewa was anchored in Ulithi's lagoon when it was struck by a Japanese-manned suicide torpedo, or "kaiten," on the morning of Nov. 20, 1944. The ship burst into flames and sank, killing 63 American Sailors.

SMIT Completes Salvage of Tanker in Lagoon

SMIT Salvage has successfully completed the salvage of the tanker Irina 2. This 15,063 gt vessel ran aground 40 miles off Oro Bay, Papua New Guinea, on July 29 after departing Kimbe with a cargo of palm crude. This casualty was one of three groundings SMIT responded to in August. The Irina 2 grounded in a lagoon. SMIT, working under a Lloyd's Open Form agreement, mobilised salvage personnel and equipment and two tugs - one of which connected up to the casualty. On August 3, the 1983-built vessel was pulled free and towed to a nearby deeper anchorage within the lagoon. The salvage team then investigated an exit route. A small tug was used to survey the area, as the lagoon contained numerous shallow areas and unmarked reefs.

Reduced Draft at Berths at New Mangalore Port

Due to monsoon conditions with siltation in the approach channel and lagoon, the maximum permissible draft at [New Mangalore's berths 10, 11, 14 & 15] is reduced to 14 metres, with 1 metre height of tide with immediate effect. New Mangalore Port  

VOOPS: Venice Offshore Onshore Port System

An artist’s rendering of the completed VOOPS project offshore port.  (Image credit: Venice Port Authority)

The New York Times once called Venice “undoubtedly the most beautiful city built by man.” But as beautiful as Venice might be, it is still a port city struggling to compete in a global economy, and beauty doesn’t attract Ultra Large Container Vessels (UCLV). Port of Venice authorities hope that its ambitious new offshore-onshore port project might do just that. The Venice Offshore Onshore Port System (VOOPS) was born out of necessity. The Venetian government made it a goal to…

Load Cell Measures Dredging Line Tension

The view from the dredge cabin. (Photo: Straightpoint)

A 2.5-ton capacity SP Radiolink plus load cell measures tension on a line stretching across a lagoon, upon which a dredge travels at a biosolids management facility, part of the City of Eugene Waste Water Dept., in Oregon, U.S. The RLP was added to inventory at the start of the latest six-month biosolids management season in March, where it replaced a dynamometer that was not suited to working in the elements. The load cell is connected to a land-based lateral move system that allows the dredge to move from side to side as well as forwards and backwards to harvest biosolids in the lagoon.

NOAA Awards $967,000 to 11 Marine Debris Removal Projects

The Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources will continue organizing cleanups to remove debris from beaches in Kaho'olawe.

NOAA’s Marine Debris Program provided $967,000 through its Restoration Center to support locally driven, community-based marine debris prevention and removal projects. Eleven groups across the country received funding to remove derelict fishing nets, litter, lumber, tires and other harmful marine debris from shorelines and coastal waters. “Marine debris plagues coastlines all over the country, and these communities have the expertise and motivation to address it,” said Nancy Wallace, Marine Debris Program director.

Coral Reefs: A Unique Natural Resource

© vlad61_61 / Adobe Stock

Stony corals are marine invertebrates with somewhat unique life cycles. For the most part, they reproduce sexually, broadcasting gametes into the water. Often, an entire coral colony or reef will spawn on the same night. Coral may also reproduce asexually by producing genetically identical polyps. Fertilized gametes drift in the current until, hopefully, they alight on a hard surface like a rock suitable for attachment. The gamete then develops into a polyp, producing a basal plate that affixes itself to the hard surface.

China Asserts Its Power at Strategic Shoal

Far out in the South China Sea, where dark blue meets bright turquoise, a miles-long row of fishing boats anchor near Scarborough Shoal, backed by a small armada of coastguard projecting China's power in Asia's most disputed waters. China still calls the shots at the prime fishing spot and has boosted its fleet there, nine months after an international panel ruled its blockade of the lagoon was illegal. Beijing rejected that ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration, which invalidated China's claim of sovereignty over most of the South China Sea. But the presence of Philippine boats dotted between Chinese vessels shows a degree of compliance with the ruling.

Clean Tanker Decline Deepens

Tumbling freight rates for clean tankers in the Atlantic have dropped steeply this week, and brokers pointed to the almost total closure of most transatlantic arbitrages as the reason. "The Continent transatlantic market has collapsed with the close of the arb'," said one New York tanker broker. London's Baltic Exchange closed on Tuesday with its assessment of the Rotterdam to New York trade down by nearly nine points on the preceding day to $0.26. Tankers for gasoline cargoes of 30,000 tons were being fixed at over $0.36 at the start of January. Traders said on Tuesday that the arbitrage would still be open for some types of gasoline if freight rates were to fall slightly.

Suspected WWII Sea Mine Found off Kiribati

Suspected Explosive Remnant of War was discovered in late May near the main wharf in Betio Lagoon, South Tarawa in the Republic of Kiribati, beneath the wreck of the MV Tovota by salvage workers from The Dive Centre Pty Ltd Fiji. The Australian Defense Force has been requested by Kiribati authorities to dispose of the object as it poses a potential hazard to local shipping.

A team of Australian Defense Force (ADF) personnel has headed to the Pacific Island nation of Kiribati to dispose of a suspected World War II sea mine. The object was discovered beneath a sunken vessel that is being salvaged by commercial operators in Betio Lagoon, South Tarawa. Six Royal Australian Navy clearance divers and a support team are flying to the island nation on a Royal Australian Air Force C-130J Hercules aircraft. They have deployed at the request of the Kiribati Government following the discovery of the object, which may date back to World War II.

Ship Runs Aground Off St. Croix

Less than a half-mile west of the channel entrance to Krause Lagoon, the freighter Sea Cloud remains hard aground in the amidships area after a failed attempt to enter the channel yesterday morning. A Coast Guard team from St. Croix immediately responded to the incident and was assisted by a second team from San Juan, Puerto Rico. The Coast Guard and local authorities along with the salvage company and environmental response contractor hired by the responsible party are working together to remove the vessel while minimizing the risk of pollution and damage to the surrounding environment. Sea Cloud is carrying a cargo of non-hazardous dry-goods loaded in containers…

Carnival to Build and Operate Cruise Terminal in Honduras

Carnival Corporation & plc has signed an agreement to build and operate a cruise terminal on the island of Roatan, Honduras. Development of the facility - to be called "Mahogany Bay - Roatan" – is expected to start in fall 2007 and be completed by summer 2009 at a cost of $50m. The cruise facility will be situated on 20 acres on the Roatan waterfront and will consist of a two-berth cruise terminal capable of accommodating super post-Panamax vessels and up to 7,000 passengers daily. Partnering with Carnival on the project is Jerry Hynds, a local business leader and a member of the Honduran Congress. He is also the owner of Coral Cay, a resort property located adjacent to the planned port facility. host 225 cruise ship calls and 500,000 passengers annually.

This Day in Naval History – Nov. 19

1813- Capt. David Porter claims Marquesas Islands for the United States. 1943 - Carrier force attacks bases on Tarawa and Makin begun. 1943 - USS Nautilus (SS-168) enters Tarawa lagoon in first submarine photograph reconnaissance mission. 1961 - At the request of President of Dominican Republic, U.S. Naval Task Force sails to Dominican Republic to bolster the country's government and to prevent a coup. 1969 - Navy astronauts CDR Charles Conrad Jr. and CDR Alan L. Bean are 3rd and 4th men to walk on the moon. They were part of Apollo 12 mission. CDR Richard F. Gordon, Jr., the Command Module Pilot, remained in lunar orbit. During the mission lasting 19 days, 4 hours, and 36 minutes, the astronauts recovered 243 lbs of lunar material. Recovery by HS-4 helicopters from USS Hornet (CVS-12).

This Day in Naval History – Nov. 19

1813- Capt. David Porter claims Marquesas Islands for the United States. 1943 - Carrier force attacks bases on Tarawa and Makin begun. 1943 - USS Nautilus (SS-168) enters Tarawa lagoon in first submarine photograph reconnaissance mission. 1961 - At the request of President of Dominican Republic, U.S. Naval Task Force sails to Dominican Republic to bolster the country's government and to prevent a coup. 1969 - Navy astronauts CDR Charles Conrad Jr. and CDR Alan L. Bean are 3rd and 4th men to walk on the moon. They were part of Apollo 12 mission. CDR Richard F. Gordon, Jr., the Command Module Pilot, remained in lunar orbit. During the mission lasting 19 days, 4 hours, and 36 minutes, the astronauts recovered 243 lbs of lunar material. Recovery by HS-4 helicopters from USS Hornet (CVS-12).

Italy to Impose Venice Cruise Ship Restrictions

Venice Cruise Ship: Photo courtesy of 'No Big Ships Committee'

The Italian government has announced it will begin to limit the number of large cruise ships that pass through Venice. Environmentalists have protested against the ships in recent years, saying they damage the city's fragile lagoon, reports BBC News. From January 2014, the number of cruise ships allowed through Venice will be cut by 20%. Ships of more than 96,000 tonnes will be banned from the centre of the city from November next year. Concerns over big ships sailing too close…

Captain Leonard to Employ GOST Nav-Tracker

The Nav-Tracker GPS tracking system from boat security systems supplier Global Ocean Security Technologies (GOST – formerly Paradox Marine) will be used to monitor the progress of Three Little Birds, a Lagoon 500 catamaran, on a- three-year circumnavigation. Boat captain Scott Leonard and his family will set sail in July and throughout the voyage, Scott plans to become “The Mobile CEO” – running his multi-million dollar financial services firm while sailing around the world on his 50 foot yacht. GOST Nav-Tracker is designed to track a vessel (or an entire fleet) from anywhere in the world with an internet connection. A boat’s precise voyage and exact location can be viewed on Google Earth and as new reports come in from the Nav-Tracker, they are automatically updated to the site.  

The World's Largest Sailing Catamaran to Set Record

Hemisphere (formerly Project Gemini), designed by naval architects Van Peteghem Lauriot Prévost (VPLP) and built by Derecktor Shipyards in Bridgeport, CT, is on course for delivery later in 2008. With a length overall of 145 ft. and a gross tonnage of just under 500,  is set to scoop the record as the world's largest sailing catamaran.  The result is a  design  with practical features blending speed and stability with both space and style. It features a draft of only 9.8ft aimed to add ease of maneuverability and access to ports and lagoons inaccessible to monohulls of comparable size.  

New MERUS Rings Aboard River Countess

Photo: Pronomar

Uniworld’s river cruise vessel River Countess set sail to cruise the lagoon of Venice and the thereto connected river delta. For doing so in accordance with the standards required for the Uniworld fleet, the vessel was equipped with MERUS rings for the complete domestic water system. Pronomar said it protected various applications on the River Countess by installing the MERUS technology at the hydrophore for the complete cold water system, at the boilers for the warm water system and at the kitchen lines for the kitchen equipment.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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