Marine Link
Sunday, January 21, 2018

Low Sulfur News

APL Joins Clean Air Program in New York Harbor

APL volunteered to burn cleaner fuel in every vessel calling at the ports of New York and New Jersey. The agreement is part of a Port Authority program designed to curb emissions in New York Harbor. Under the plan, APL vessels will use low-sulfur fuel in auxiliary generators while berthed. “We have been leaders in implementing clean-air measures on our ships,” said Gene Seroka, APL President in the Americas. Earlier in October, APL joined a low-sulfur fuel program at the Port of Hong Kong. It has long been part of similar programs at the ports of Los Angeles, Oakland, Seattle and Vancouver, British Columbia. The Port Authority will reimburse 50% of the added cost APL incurs. Low-sulfur fuel is more expensive to burn.

Beijing Forced to Use Low-Sulfur Coal from August 1

Anti Pollution measures

Xinhua News Agency reported on Saturday that Beijing from August 1 will be forced to use low-sulfur coal to help improve air quality in Beijing. Reported, citing the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Quality Supervision, said, according to the "low-sulfur coal and products" local standards to be implemented in Beijing, Beijing will be forced to use low-sulfur coal.The standard for the quality of coal in particular the relationship between environmental pollution and sulfur, volatile organic compounds and other indicators, strict control, some indicators than the national standard.

Neste to Supply Low-Sulfur Marine Fuel to Polferries

Image: Polferries

Neste and Polferries, a Polish company with a fleet of ferries operating on the Baltic Sea, have agreed on the delivery of low-sulfur marine fuel for the Nynäshamn-Gdansk route in 2017. "Polferries is an important new customer for us. This cooperation is enabled by the fact that our product's distribution services are expanding to Sweden. It's great that a Polish company in the ferry business has taken our premium quality, low-sulfur product into use," says Panu Kopra, Executive Vice President of Neste Oil Retail.

MOL Vessels Enrolled in Low Sulfur Fuel Program

MOL announced that it has voluntarily enrolled two of its vessels, the MOL Endowment and MOL Experience, in the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Ocean Going Vessel Low Sulfur Fuel Program. MOL is one of the first ocean carriers to enroll in the Low Sulfur Fuel program, and is the first of the Japanese carriers to do so. The program provides incentives to operators of ocean vessels to utilize low-sulfur fuel in their main propulsion and auxiliary engines instead of bunker fuel known as Intermediate Fuel Oil 380. Switching to low-sulfur fuels reduces emissions of fine particles as well as carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and nitrous oxide and contributes to the improvement of the environment.

EPA Approves Marine Diesel Additive

EPA approves ValvTect BioGuard Plus 6™, the only biocide that prevents bacteria and provides six other benefits.

ValvTect BioGuard Plus 6 prevents bacteria and solves all other diesel fuel related problems - eliminates need for multiple products. Jerry Nessenson, president of ValvTect Petroleum, announced today that ValvTect has received formal approval for the registration and sale of ValvTect BioGuard Plus 6 multifunctional biocide diesel additive from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and in all 50 states. “Prior to the EPA’s approval of ValvTect BioGuard Plus 6, all biocides…

EPA Issues Notice on Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a notice stating that, effective June 1, refiners will begin producing low-sulfur diesel fuel for use in ships. Initially, the sulfur content may not exceed 500 parts per million (ppm). The eventual goal is a maximum sulfur content of 15 ppm. Source: HK Law

Neste to Deliver Low-Sulfur Marine Fuel to Eckerö Line

Image: Eckerö Line

Neste will begin deliveries of low-sulfur marine fuel to Eckerö Line at the beginning of next year. The agreement covers m/s Finlandia on the Helsinki-Tallinn route throughout 2017. "I am happy that Eckerö Line selected Neste as its partner. The quality of our low-sulfur marine fuel, lower sulfur emissions, and our logistics services convinced Eckerö Line to work with us. Refueling will take place at sea from ship to ship. This eliminates the need for tanker traffic among other cargo in the port area…

CMA CGM to Apply Low Sulfur Surcharge

Photo: CMA CGM

CMA CGM said it will implement a low sulfur surcharge on all its trades in Emission Control Areas (ECAs) and for all cargos as of January 1, 2015. MARPOL Annex VI regulations for the prevention of air pollution from ships assign Sulfur Oxides (SOx) Emission Control Areas (ECA) with more stringent controls on sulfur emissions. Stricter regulations covering the sulfur content of fuel oil will be strengthened by local regulators in the European Union, U.S. and Canada. First implemented in the Baltic Sea more than 10 years ago…

Cargill To Ship Low Sulfur Cargo From SE Asia

Cargill Inc is reportedly in the process of shipping the first low-sulfur gas oil or diesel cargo from Southeast Asia to Europe. Reports say the company had chartered a tanker called the Young Lady, which is on its maiden clean products voyage, to lift a total of 680,000 barrels of gas oil from the Malacca II refinery in June. The Malaysian refinery is the only major refinery in Southeast Asia that can produce high-quality diesel that meets tight United States CARB and European EN590 specifications, traders said.

Washington State Ferries to Shift to Clean Fuel Initiative

Washington State Ferries (WSF)/Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) will shift the entire ferry fleet to low-sulfur diesel fuel, test ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, and test biodiesel fuel—all steps that will improve air quality by reducing the amount of harmful substances in the ferries’ diesel fuel exhaust. The ferry system also has upgraded its vessels with more-efficient engines and made operational changes that have reduced fuel consumption and emissions, and will continue seeking new ways to improve fuel efficiency. As a result of all these changes, nearly 10,000 fewer tons of pollutants will be released into the air by ferry fuel emissions.

Low Sulfer Fuel Demand Set to Rise

New international rules – set to enter force in May 2005 – which require ships to burn fuel oil with a maximum sulfur content of 4.5 percent by May next year, and down to 1.5 a year later in certain world regions, will significantly boost the demand for low sulfur fuels, according to wire reports. The measures are set to increase shippers' demand for low sulfur fuel oil, while supplies may be insufficient to meet the anticipated pick-up in buying interest. Front month forward paper prices for fuel oil with a low 1.5 percent sulfur content were at about $168.50 a ton on Tuesday, just $2 above 3.5 percent high sulfur fuel oil prices. The premium widens to $7 a ton for fourth-quarter paper, and to $10 by the third quarter of 2005.

Singapore Registers Double-Digit Bunker Fuel Sales Growth

Photo source: Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore

Maritime and Port Authority (MPA) of Singapore said that Singapore bunker fuel sales rose 5.34% month on month and up 12.33% year on year, to 3.58 million mt in March reports Platts. The vessel arrivals in Singapore for bunker fuel rose to 3,295 in March, up 9.65% from February and up 0.61% year on year, the data showed. According to official figures released by the MPA, the March volumes included 2.65 million mt of 380 CST high sulfur fuel oil, 56,100 mt of 180 CST HSFO and 721,400 mt of 500 CST HSFO.

EPA Modifies Diesel Fuel Sulfur Transition Rule

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is modifying its diesel fuel sulfur transition rule to provide production and distribution industries with additional time to complete the transition from low-sulfur diesel (no more than 500 ppm sulfur) to ultra-low-sulfur diesel (no more than 15 ppm sulfur). Terminals and retailers will now have until October 15, 2006 to complete the transition. This rule applies to terminals and retailers that supply diesel fuel for highway use and for non-road use, such as for use as marine diesel fuel. 70 Fed. Reg. 70498 source: HK Law

ClassNK - Guidance for Degraded Fuels

Key factors affecting FO problems noted in 1996 consist of the four “highs”, that is, high density, high viscosity, high sulfur, and high catalytic fines. Key factors affecting FO problems in 2008, however, have shifted to one “high” and three “lows”, that is, high density, low viscosity, low sulfur, and low catalytic fines. The text gives a good technical explanation of the many factors that contribute to problems caused by poor combustibility and the various measures that can be taken to address these issues. The contents of this updated and revised Guidance include a discussion on the shift in factors affecting FO problems and examine FO with poor combustibility, low-sulfur FO, ISO standards, emission regulations, FO processing systems, and countermeasures for improving FO use.

NOAA: Air Pollution Plummets when Ships Shift Fuels

New clean fuel regulations in California and voluntary slowdowns by shipping companies substantially reduce air pollution caused by near-shore ships, according to a new NOAA-led study published online today in Environmental Science & Technology. The study examined a container ship operating under a 2009 California regulation requiring that ships switch to low-sulfur fuels as they approach the California coast, and also adhering to a voluntary state slowdown policy, intended to reduce pollution. The research team found that emissions of several health-damaging pollutants, including sulfur dioxide and particulate matter, dropped by as much as 90 percent.

IMO Low-Sulfur Requirements to Disrupt Industries

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) recently confirmed that global refiners and shippers must comply with new regulations to reduce the sulfur content in marine bunker fuels by January 2020—five years earlier than many expected. As a result, both the global refining and shipping industries will experience rapid change and significant cost and operational impacts, according to new analysis from IHS Markit, the leading global source of critical information and insight.

California Passes Law to Reduce Emissions

The California Air Resources Board adopted a regulation that eliminates 15 tons of diesel exhaust daily from ocean-going vessels. The new measure requires ocean-going vessels within 24 nautical miles of 's coastline to use lower-sulfur marine distillates in their main and auxiliary engines and auxiliary boilers, rather than bunker fuel. About 2,000 ocean-going vessels visiting ports annually are subject to this restriction. The regulation will be implemented in two steps, each requiring lower sulfur content in the fuel- first in 2009 and final in 2012. Both U.S.-flagged and foreign-flagged vessels are subject to the regulation which is the most stringent and comprehensive requirement for marine fuel-use in the world.

Maersk Leads Fuel Switch at Port of Virginia

Maersk Line will switch to low-sulfur fuel while at berth for all of its containerships calling the Port of Virginia starting in February. This fuel switch program will help improve air quality in the greater Hampton Roads area by significantly reducing emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. Maersk Line is the lead shipping line to participate in the fuel switch program sponsored by the Commonwealth of Virginia through the Virginia Port Authority (VPA) and the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ), as well as the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Continental Refining Expands Diesel Offering

Photo: Continental Refining Company

Continental Refining Company Now Processing Low Sulfur Marine Diesel T90-700 and Completes Upgrades to Receive Transmix for Finished 500ppm LM Diesel Fuel Production; CRC Expands with Two New Niche Market Product Offerings that Serve Marine Users and Help to Prevent Bottlenecks in the U.S. Today Continental Refining Company, LLC announced a new product offering for the marine market with the production of low sulfur marine diesel, a special blend distillate fuel that has a T-90 greater than700° f…

MARAD Tests Alternative Power for Ships

The Maritime Administration (MARAD) is testing state-of-the-art, environmentally efficient technology onboard the Training Ship (TS) Kennedy. The National Defense Reserve Fleet vessel was provided to the Massachusetts Maritime Academy by MARAD for Cadet training. This one-year undertaking is part of a MARAD initiative to test fuel cells as a source of power for shipboard electrical systems. Researchers will evaluate the performance of the fuel cell technology and how low sulfur marine diesel fuel can be used to efficiently power a fuel cell to produce auxiliary power.

Unusually, Shipping Coalition Demands an ECA

A coalition of shipping companies wants the Pearl River Delta cleaned up and turned into a low emission zone. The call, from the Hong Kong Liner Shipping Association (HKLSA) and the Hong Kong Shipowners’ Association (HKSA) in conjunction with 17 shipping companies came along with a renewed, one-year pledge from the shipping companies to burn only low-sulfur fuels while berthed in Hong Kong, reports the China Daily. The coalition wants low sulfur emissions mandated by laws by January 2014. But in the meantime, the coalition is also recommending that authorities provide incentives, such as a 50 percent cut in port fees for vessels that come into voluntary compliance, prior to the January 2014 deadline. The alliance wants to increase its reach, beyond Hong Kong however.

IBIA in Attack Mode

Bunker fuel company staff supervising supply operations at port [Photo: ©2016 Patrick King Photo for GAC]

The IMO’s MEPC 70 proposals for a marine fuels sulfur cap of 0.5% to be in place by 2020 have attracted severe criticism from several major stakeholders in the maritime sector, including the International Bunker Industry Association, the organization that defends the interests of bunker fuel suppliers. The IBIA has stated that several unknowns remain about the proposed limit and has asked whether assumed global capacity will translate into actual marine market supply in 2020: “Will refiners produce suitable fuels, and what will these fuels look like?

Alaska Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel Transition

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated its final rule implementing requirements for sulfur, cetane, and aromatics for highway, nonroad, locomotive, and marine diesel fuel produced in, imported into, and distributed or used in the rural areas of Alaska. Beginning June 1, 2010, diesel fuel used in these applications must meet the 15 ppm (maximum) sulfur content standard. Source: HK Law

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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