Marine Link
Monday, March 19, 2018

Marine Environmental Protection Committee News

Kyriacou to Lead De Nora's BWMS Unit

Dr. Stelios Kyriacou (Photo: De Nora)

Electrochlorination equipment supplier De Nora announced that Dr. Stelios Kyriacou has been appointed as General Manager of its BALPURE Ballast Water Management System (BWMS) business unit. Dr. Kyriacou joins De Nora Water Technologies from Wärtsilä, where he managed the research, development, design and certification of the full Wärtsilä BWMS range. He previously undertook the same role at Hamworthy from 2009 until its acquisition by Wärtsilä and held roles at Hatlapa Marine Equipment. Dr.

Piranha Waste Water Systems Receives Approval

ACT2 Technologies, a Fla. based company specializing in Sewage Treatment, Water Purification , Oil to Water and many other Waste to Water Systems, announced that they have received U.S. Coast Guard Certifications for 13 of their Piranha Waste to Water Systems. The Piranha Systems are ocean friendly using an environmentally safe, energy efficient and “green” method to convert waste water into clean water for purposes of discharging, recycling for on-board technical uses or re-flushing. The process converts waste into clean water removing the need for a separate sludge tank. The low maintenance and compact design features of the system were made with small, mid-sized and large vessel operations in mind. The Piranha Systems are compliant with the recent expanded U.S.

Stakeholders Discuss Use of HFO in the Arctic

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) held a public listening session in Washington D.C. on September 27, 2016 to address ships’ use of heavy fuel oil (HFO) in the Arctic, examining its risks and as well as potential mitigation strategies which can be taken to the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The event was held in the Department of Transportation building, where Paul “Chip” Jaenichen, Sr., Maritime Administrator for the U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD), welcomed participants. The listening session was led by Jeff Lantz, director of Commercial Regulations and Standards at USCG headquarters, and head of U.S. Delegation to the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee and Marine Environment Protection Committee.

Linsin Joins Blank Rome

Blank Rome LLP announced that Gregory F. Linsin has joined the Firm as a Partner in the White Collar, Internal & Government Investigations practice group. Mr. Linsin brings more than 25 years of experience as a federal prosecutor and has an extensive background in the supervision and prosecution of complex maritime and environmental criminal cases with the Environmental Crimes Section of the United States Department of Justice. Mr. Linsin will be based in Firm’s Washington, D.C. office. Prior to joining Blank Rome, Linsin served as Special Litigation Counsel for the United States Department of Justice, Environmental Crimes Section. In this capacity, Mr.

Ocean Conservancy Calls for Clean Arctic

Photo: Ocean Conservancy

“Ocean Conservancy welcomes steps taken by the International Maritime Organization to mitigate risks to the Arctic from the use and carriage of the world’s dirtiest fossil fuel. “Support for Measures to Reduce Risks of Use and Carriage of Heavy Fuel Oil as Fuel by Ships in Arctic Waters marks an important milestone in the bid to phase out the use of heavy fuel oil in the Arctic. “With climate change impacts resulting in record-breaking loss of sea ice—winter ice in the Arctic…

New Sponsor for Marine Science

Image: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s marine science advisory group, Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP), is welcoming a new sponsor. The International Seabed Authority (ISA), the agency responsible for regulating mining and related activities in the international seabed, beyond national jurisdiction, an area that includes most of the world's oceans, is becoming the tenth sponsoring organization of GESAMP. The new…

Responders Tracking Containers Lost off North Carolina

(File photo: Maersk Line)

The U.S. Coast Guard, NOAA and Environmental Protection Agency are monitoring the tracking and assessment of more than six dozen stray cargo containers lost due to high winds and heavy seas about 17 miles off Oregon Inlet, N.C. On Sunday, March 4, the cargo ship Maersk Shanghai alerted watchstanders at Sector North Carolina’s command center that they lost about 70 cargo containers during a heavy roll. Maersk later confirmed the total number of containers lost overboard was 76 as well as their contents. A. P.

IMO Dodges Marshall Islands Plea for CO2 Target

Emissions from shipping. Photo courtesy: HZG

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) has dodged a decision on the setting of a new global target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping, proposed by the Marshall Islands. The environmental lobby group Transport & Environment (T&E)  accused the IMO of falling to "procedural excuses" and ignoring obligations. The proposal was initially announced last month, with Marshall Islands' Minister of Foreign Affairs, Tony de Brum having said at the time that the industry could grow to represent 6 to 14 percent of global emissions if "urgent action" was not taken.

Seminar, Environmental Reqs for Ships

A Seminar on Environmental Requirements for Commercial and Navy Ships for Efficient Maritime Operations and Effective Environmental Stewardship will be held on Dec. 9, 2009, at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta in Atlanta, Ga. Sponsored by ASTM Committee F25 on Ships and Marine Technology, the seminar will be held in conjunction with the Dec. 8-10 standards development meetings of the committee. The desired outcome of this seminar is to identify areas where environmental standards should be developed to fill gaps to improve maritime operations and at the same time promote environmental stewardship. Participants will learn the latest requirements for marine environmental protection of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and U.S.

IMO: TBT Ban Could Have Adverse Effects

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) held its 43rd session of the Marine Environmental Protection Committee (MEPC) from June 28th through July 1st. Delegates to the MEPC were expected to consider a proposal to ban the application of tributyltin (TBT) self-polishing copolymer paints by the year 2003. At the previous MEPC session in November 1998, delegates prepared a draft resolution that calls for a ban on the application of TBT by 2003 and a ban on its use by 2008. These dates were designated based on the assumption that viable alternatives would be available on the market. However, since November, serious questions have been raised concerning the possible adverse environmental effects and the availability of suitable alternative paints.

Dr. Anne-Marie Warris: WISTA-UK Personality of the Year

Dr. Anne-Marie Warris (Courtesy of ISO)

Dr. Anne-Marie Warris, an internationally respected expert in the fields of sustainable shipping, climate change and environmental management, has been chosen as Personality of the Year 2013 by WISTA-UK, part of the Women’s International Shipping & Trading Association. Dr. Warris recently retired from a leading environmental role at Lloyd’s Register to initiate a new venture, ecoreflect ltd, a U.K.-registered company, whose purpose is “to explore ‘eco’ and to ‘reflect’ on the…

INTERTANKO Welcomes IMO’s Revisions to MARPOL Annex VI

An historic agreement was struck last week when the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Marine Environmental Protection Committee (MEPC 57) reached agreement on a package of amendments and revisions to MARPOL(*) Annex VI (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) which, subject to formal adoption at MEPC 58 in October 2008, will enter into force through the tacit amendment procedure in February 2010. These measures provide for the wellbeing of our environment, and of those who live and work on ships or near ports. They address regional and global concerns on sulphur oxide (SOx), nitrogen oxide (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM) emissions from both new and existing ships in an integrated manner…

Shipping Officials To Discuss Singe Hull Phase Out

Shipping legislators meet on Monday to discuss a timetable for eliminating single-hulled tankers, a pollution threat to the world's coastlines. But major maritime nation Brazil looks set to oppose the ban, proposed by the European Union, which eventually would see the world's fleet limited to double-hulled tankers. Shipping sources said many more countries were planning to back Brazil's position at the meeting in London of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). IMO, during a week-long session, will discuss possible deadlines of either 2015 or 2017 by which time all the world's single-hulled tanker fleet would have to sail to the scrapping beaches. The meeting is under the Marine Environmental Protection Committee, which is comprised of 113 nations from IMO's 158 members' states.

Montgomery McCracken Names Two Maritime Attorneys to Firm Partnership

Robert E. O’Connor (Photo: Montgomery McCracken)

Montgomery McCracken announced it has named attorneys Robert E. O’Connor and Davis Lee Wright to the firm’s partnership. O’Connor, located in the firm’s New York office, was previously an associate. Wright, who is located in the firm’s Wilmington office, was of counsel. O’Connor is a general litigator and a member of the firm’s Maritime and Transportation practice group. He represents insurers, owners and operators of vessels, and marine fuel suppliers among others. O’Connor also…

Scrubbers Set to Help Shippers Meet the New Sulfur Cap

The 0.5 percent global sulfur cap by 2020 requires marine industry action. “By 2025, up to 20 percent of the global fleet could have [scrubber] technology installed,” estimates DuPont Clean Technologies Marine Business Development Manager, Europe, Marco Dierico. “Ship owners and operators that want to minimize costly changes and continue to burn heavy fuel oil (HFO) will require a scrubber to clean the fuel. The October 27 decision from the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Marine Environmental Protection Committee (MEPC) to enforce a global 0.5 percent cap on sulfur emissions from fuels by 2020 will necessitate ship owners and operators to select an emissions abatement solution in order to meet the new requirements.

Definitive Study On The Impact Of Global Sulphur Regulations


Marine Energy Consulting Ltd. (MECL) and 20|20 Marine Energy, two leading consultancies in this field, today announced that they will collaborate to produce a comprehensive evaluation of the impact of MARPOL Annex VI global sulphur regulations on the shipping industry. The study will include a detailed impact assessment of the regulations, as well as insights into compliance solutions, enabling recipients to make more informed decisions when developing strategies to both manage the transition, and the future.

Wärtsilä acquires Transas

Transas Collaborative Decision Making Platform uniting Ship, Fleet Operations, Training and Ship Traffic Control Image Transas

Wärtsilä announced today that it has acquired Transas, an innovative, digital solutions provider headquartered in the UK. This acquisition is a recognition of Transas’ strong position in the maritime technologies market and its technological leadership. The transaction will allow Transas to work within a global maritime company in delivering its solutions, bringing scale and value to the industry in need of innovation leadership. Transas is a global market leader in marine navigation solutions that include complete bridge systems, digital solutions and electronic charts.

MARAD Issues Report

The Maritime Administration (MARAD) issued its quarterly Report on Port and Shipping Safety and Environmental Protection dated July 2002. The report reviews such maritime developments as the recent meetings of the IMO Legal Committee and Maritime Safety Committee, as well as the proposed EPA rule regarding emission standards for certain new marine diesel engines. Source: HK Law

Stopping the Spread of Invasive Species

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Non-native species can be spread from ocean to ocean via ship. They may be carried via ballast water or attach to the hulls and other parts of ships, hitching a ride across the oceans. International Maritime Organization (IMO) is addressing this problem through the Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention, which entered into force in September 2017 and requires ships to manage their ballast water to limit the spread of aquatic organisms. Also, IMO’s Biofouling Guidelines address bioinvasions via ships’ hulls.

MARAD Issues Report on Port and Shipping Safety

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) released its quarterly report on port and shipping safety and environmental protection. This report discusses the latest session of the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee; the bill to reauthorize the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21); the Coast Guard’s interim maritime security regulations; and the OECD report on Security in Maritime Transportation.

Tug, Switcher Engine Upgrades Offer Most Cost-Effective Options

© itsallgood / Adobe Stock

Clean diesel technology upgrades for large tug and switcher locomotive engines cost only $4,379 to $15,201 per ton of nitrogen oxides (NOx), compared to more than $30,000 per ton of NOx for many other diesel emission reduction projects. The Diesel Technology Forum (DTF) and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has released a report documenting the significant emission reduction benefits that can be gained by replacing older engines in tug boats and switcher locomotives with the latest clean diesel models.

Emission Policies Update

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

An overview of worldwide emission control policies and technologies has been presented at an international workshop in Hong Kong, China (14 to 16 December 2016). International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s Heike Deggim outlined the current regulations and recent work in the Marine Environment Protection Committee to an audience of government officials, international shipping industry representatives, academics and environmental non-governmental organizations. The presentation covered IMO regulations to control air pollution emissions from ships…

IMO Closer to Polar Environmental Regulation

Photo: Danish Maritime Authority

Last week, the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of United Nations’ International Maritime Organization (IMO) agreed which ships are to be covered by the future environmental regulations for voyages in polar areas, The Danish Maritime Authority said. An international set of regulations on navigation in polar areas, referred to as the Polar Code, is still at the top of the IMO agenda. The Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) intensively debated the environmental provisions in the Polar Code.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Mar 2018 - Annual World Yearbook

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