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Thursday, December 14, 2017

Marine Safety Unit News

Coast Guard Monitors Sunken Tow Boat

Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Port Arthur is monitoring the pollution threat and structural integrity of the 132-foot, U.S.-flagged towing vessel Mama Lere, which is partially submerged and accompanied by a four barge tow. The Mama Lere began flooding while transiting from New Orleans to Houston. The flooding began in the engine room at Mile Marker 289 on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the West Port Arthur Bridge. Coast Guard small boats were in the area at the time of the sinking and rescued the five crewmembers onboard. The Mama Lere is believed to be carrying approximately 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel oil. The vessel is not obstructing navigation and the waterway currently remains open to traffic as monitored by Marine Safety Unit Port Arthur.

Container Ship Delivers First Boxes to Great Lakes Port

Coast Guard Inspection: USCG photo

The US Coast Guard say that the 'Fortunagracht', a 450-foot Dutch-flagged container ship, has delivered the first-ever load of containerized cargo to the Great Lakes. Before the establishment of the Cleveland-Europe Express, shippers relied heavily on rail service to transport goods from the larger east coast container ports, such as New York and Baltimore, to the Great Lakes region. Talks to bring CEE to Cleveland began in the fall with cooperation between the Coast Guard, Customs and Border Protection, the FBI and other government agencies.

Houston Ship Channel Collision: Tank Barge & Cargo Ship

Hull damage: Photo credit USCG

The cause of a collision between the cargo ship 'Genius Star VII' and a barge loaded with 840,000 gallons of #6 fuel oil in the Houston Ship Channel is being investigated by the US Coast Guard. Watchstanders with Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Texas City received a report at approximately 8:30 p.m., on Friday concerning a collision, which occurred between a loaded barge and a 394-foot cargo ship loaded with grain. There has been no report of injuries or pollution from either vessel. Both vessels are reporting damage, but are in stable condition.

Coast Guard Investigates Collision in Houston Ship Channel

The unloaded 800-foot tanker, Minerva Maya, sustained some damage after a collision with a tug pushing barges in the Houston Ship Channel June 2, 2013. No injury or pollution was reported from the incident. U.S Coast Guard Photo.

The Coast Guard responded to a collision between a tug pushing barges and a tanker in the Houston Ship Channel Sunday. There has been no report of pollution or injury from either vessel. The unloaded 800-foot tanker, Minerva Maya, is reporting damage to the port bow and the five barges being pushed by the tug, M.L. Crochet, sustained some damage. All vessels are currently secured and in stable condition. Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Texas City watchstanders were notified of the collision at 9 a.m. and began the response.

Coast Guard Investigates Barge Allison

Personnel from Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Huntington, W.Va., are investigating the cause of an allision between the H. Carpenter bridge and the M/V C.J. Queenan in St. Mary's today. The Coast Guard received the report at about 8:30 a.m. that the M/V C.J. Queenan and its fifteen barge tow had allided with the bridge at mile marker 155.5 along the Ohio River. The barges were empty at the time, and there are no reports of injuries or pollution, and preliminary reports indicate very minor damage to bridge and barges. The waterway remains open, and the cause of the accident is currently under investigation by personnel from Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Huntington.

Feeder Ports for Marine Inspector Training

The US Coast Guard issued an ALCOAST (All Coast Guard Message) designating 18 Sectors and Marine Safety Units as “Feeder Ports” to be utilized for training of new marine safety and security personnel.  The designation recognizes that these units have a sufficiently diverse workload and volume to allow for training in at least four of the 17 marine inspection and port state control examination competencies, as well as sufficient experienced staff to provide mentoring. (2/11/09). (Source: Holland & Knight)

OSV Strikes Rig

The Coast Guard was responding to an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on February 16, 140 miles southeast of Galveston, Texas. The spill is located approximately 30 miles south of the Flower Gardens Banks National Marine Sanctuary, an environmentally sensitive area. At 4:28 a.m. a watchstander at Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Galveston received a call from the master of the Grady Fagan, a 193-ft offshore supply ship. The master reported that the Grady Fagan hit the rig Ocean Star as it was preparing to offload supplies. The ship was holed below the water line in its starboard fuel tank, the collision also caused a 2-inch gash above the water line. An unknown amount of diesel fuel has leaked from the ship. The fuel tank held 9,000 gallons of diesel fuel.

USCG Ensures Safety at Tall Ship Festival

Aboard the tall ship Royaliste, Wayne "Lord Pirate Captain Marcato" Marquardt listens as U.S. Coast Guard Chief Warrant Officer Jack Hambidge of Marine Safety Unit Chicago explains the safety requirements the Royaliste must meet before people may board the vessel for tours during the Tall Ships Festival at Navy Pier in Chicago Aug. 24, 2010. Coast Guard marine inspectors boarded every tall ship before visitors were allowed on to ensure the ships met all the safety requirements. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Jorgensen)

Hurricane Katrina – USCG Operations in Sector New Orleans

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Marine Safety Bulletin expressing its appreciation for the overwhelming industry support during the ongoing response effort to Hurricane Katrina. Marine Safety Unit (MSU) Morgan City will serve as the primary point of contact for the marine industry with regard to Sector New Orleans issues. Source: HK Law

New Unit To Stand-Up

A new Coast Guard marine safety unit has been put into place to more quickly respond to a myriad of marine safety missions, such as response to oil spills and commercial vessel incidents in northeast North Carolina. Marine Safety Team Elizabeth City, N.C., a field unit for Marine Safety Office Wilmington, N.C., has been stood-up at the Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City and will be responsible for port safety and security, inspections of U.S. flagged vessels, including passenger ferries, marine environmental protection, commercial fishing vessel safety program, and investigations of marine casualties and accidents. “By having a marine safety team at this location, we are able to more adequately and more rapidly respond to many types of marine safety incidents,” said Coast Guard Lt.

USCG Reorganizes Sector North Carolina

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a final rule reorganizing Sector North Carolina.  Effective immediately, the headquarters for Sector North Carolina is moving from Fort Macon to Wilmington.  Marine Safety Unit Wilmington is being disestablished as a separate unit.  76 Fed. Reg. 26603  (May 9, 2011).   (Source: Bryant’s Maritime News)

Coast Guard Recognizes WW II Veteran

Rear Adm. Fred Midgette (left) presents World War II veteran Phillip Sustersic with awards he earned while serving in the Merchant marines nearly 70 years ago. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher M. Yaw

The United States Coast Guard honored World War II veteran Phillip Sustersic for his Merchant Marine Service nearly 70 years ago with medals during a ceremony held at Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Cleveland on September 5, 2013. Rear Adm. Fred Midgette, commander of the Coast Guard 9th District, presented the Ohio veteran Mr. Sustersic with the the World War II Victory Medal, the Atlantic War Zone Medal, the Mediterranean War Zone Medal, the Honorable Service Button, the Merchant Marine Emblem, a Harry Truman presidential letter and a 9th District challenge coin. uscgnews.com  

US Coast Guard Hosts Subchapter M Forum

Steven Douglas from the Coast Guard Towing Vessel National Center of Expertise explains the inspections requirements for new and existing towing vessels outlined in Subchapter M, at Illinois Marine Towing Nov. 9, 2016. Douglas presented the information during a forum held to educate more than 80 industry representatives from across the Midwest. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Byron Rios)

Marine Safety Unit Chicago and the U.S. Coast Guard Towing Vessel National Center of Expertise hosted an informational outreach forum Wednesday with towing vessel operators to explain the implementation of the new regulations for the inspection of towing vessels, Subchapter M. The meeting was held at the offices of Illinois Marine Towing in Lemont Wednesday morning with more than 80 industry representatives from the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River Basin attending. This informational…

Coast Guard MSU Savannah Change of Command

Change of Command ceremony: Photo USCG

Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit (MSU) Savannah informs it has held a change of command ceremony to formally recognize transfer of command of the unit from Cmdr. Joseph Loring to Cmdr. Amy Beach. Cmdr. Loring served as commander of MSU Savannah for the past three years and is departing to continue his service at Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Loring said Savannah has an excellent and strong maritime community and provides unparalleled military support, and the MSU does great work so it is hard for him to leave. “I’ve had a great tour,” he added. Cmdr.

65-foot Vessel Grounds Near Shoup Bay, Alaska

Coast Guard personnel monitor the 65-foot fishing tender, Fate Hunter, after it grounded near Shoup Bay, approximately four miles west of Valdez, Alaska, Aug. 11, 2013. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Marine Safety Unit Valdez)

Coast Guard and State of Alaska personnel are monitoring a 65-foot fishing tender grounded near Shoup Bay, four miles west of Valdez, Sunday. The owner of the 65–foot fishing tender, Fate Hunter, is working with Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Valdez and State of Alaska personnel to minimize environmental impact from the grounding and refloat the vessel. Coast Guard Sector Anchorage command center watchstanders received a call Sunday morning from the crew of the Fate Hunter, reporting the vessel had run aground near Shoup Bay with four persons on board.

Valdez Fire Dept., USCG Respond to Vessel Fire in Valdez

City of Valdez and U.S. Coast Guard personnel responded to a report of a vessel fire at the Crowley fuel dock within the Valdez Small Boat Harbor. At approximately 11:30 a.m. Monday morning, the 28-foot recreational vessel Falcon, with two adults and three children onboard, caught fire at the Crowley fuel dock in the Valdez Small Boat Harbor. All five persons aboard were transferred to shore and Crowley dock employees quickly secured fuel to the pier’s pumps. The Valdez Fire Department, Valdez Harbormaster’s Office, and Coast Guard immediately responded to the scene and found the Falcon engulfed in flames and a small fire on the Crowley fuel dock.

Bulker Owner Fined for US Ballast Water Discharge

The U.S. Coast Guard said it has issued a $5,000 fine to the owners of a foreign freight vessel for unauthorized ballast water discharge into the Willamette River in Portland, August 16. During a routine port state control ballast water examination on the 590-foot bulk freighter ANSAC Moon Bear, Coast Guard marine inspectors, from Marine Safety Unit Portland, discovered that the vessel had discharged untreated ballast water into the Willamette River on three separate occasions during port calls in 2017. As part of the port state control exam, log books were reviewed during administrative evaluations by the marine inspectors, which led to the ballast water discharge discovery.

Crude Oil Filled Barges Freed after Weekend Grounding

Photo: USCG

Two double-skinned barges, loaded with approximately two million gallons of crude oil, grounded near the Galveston Causeway Bridge Sunday and were freed Tuesday. After many unsuccessful attempts to unground the barges with assist tugs Monday, the Coast Guard approved a plan to offload some crude oil to stand-by barges to lessen the weight and increase buoyancy, which freed them. Marine Safety Unit Texas City personnel were on scene throughout the offloading and reloading of the crude oil in order to ensure the evolution was successful and to investigate the cause of the grounding.

Coast Guard Inspects Cleveland's First Containership

Petty Officer 2nd Class Cody Johnson, a marine inspector stationed at Marine Safety Unit Cleveland, inspects navigation equipment aboard the motor vessel Fortunagract for compliance with international and domestic regulations April 19, 2014. Fortunagracht was the first vessel of its kind to enter the Great Lakes as part of the newly-formed Cleveland-Europe Express. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Stephanie Pitts

U.S. Coast Guard marine inspectors conducted safety and security examinations on the first-ever containership to arrive in Cleveland Saturday morning. The Fortunagracht, a 450-foot Dutch-flagged containership, delivered the first-ever load of containerized cargo to the Great Lakes. Before the establishment of the Cleveland-Europe Express, shippers relied heavily on rail service to transport goods from the larger east coast container ports, such as New York and Baltimore, to the Great Lakes region.

US Coast Guard Fishing Vessel Safety Examinations Now in Force

USCG's mandatory commercial fishing vessel safety examinations for those operating more than three miles from the territorial sea baseline take effect. This requirement, which affects commercial fishing fleets nationwide, comes as a result of Congress' passing of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2010. To help fishermen come into compliance with the regulations that apply to their vessel, the Coast Guard has built an on-line commercial fishing vessel "checklist generator" available here. This tool will help owners and operators to understand their specific equipment and operational requirements and the checklist can be used to examine the vessel and prepare for the Coast Guard visit.

Oil & Chemical Cargo Barges Collide in Intercoastal Waterway

Photos of damage to the barge CBC 7026 and barge TTI-150 after they collided near mile marker 341 in the Intracoastal Waterway, Dec. 23, 2013. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The Coast Guard has responded to a collision between two barges in the vicinity of Siever’s Cove on Bolivar Peninsula, in the Intracoastal Waterway. The captain of the tug pushing the barge TTI-150 contacted watchstanders at Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Texas City to report this barge's collision with barge CBC 7026. A 25-foot Response Boat from Station Galveston was sent with a team of incident responders, marine inspectors, and marine casualty investigators, to conduct a preliminary investigation and mitigate any possible further risk to the environment or the mariners aboard the vessels.

Freighter Allides with Two Boats

The Unified Command responded to two boats being struck on the West Bank of the Flats in . The Unified Command consists of the Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Cleveland, Dept. of Natural Resources, the Cleveland Fire Dept., Cleveland Police Dept., the Fire Boat Anthony J. Celebreeze and the Cleveland Harbor Master. The Station Cleveland 25-foot response boat were on scene providing a safety zone to ensure safe travel of all boating traffic. Motor Vessel Cuyahoga struck two boats while transiting up the , one boat was severely damaged and is submerged, and one received lesser damage and both were moored at the dock behind Shooters Night Club. The submerged vessel has two large fuel tanks filled with gasoline and is currently sheening.

Tankship, Bulk Carrier Collide off Galveston

Hull collision damage: Photo credit USCG

U.S. Coast Guard reported a collision between deep draft tankship and bulk ship 30 miles off Galveston. At approximately 5:50 a.m. watchstanders at Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Texas City received a report of a collision between the 900-foot Tank Vessel Profit loaded with approximately 19 million gallons of crude oil and the 625-foot Motor Vessel Imperial Spirit loaded with grain. There has been no report of injury or pollution from either vessel; however, both vessels are reporting damage but are in stable condition.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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