Marine Link
Friday, January 19, 2018

Modern Piracy News

Danger on the High Seas

A tale of survival could best describe John S. Burnett's experience onboard his sloop Unicorn in January 1992. Sailing solo across the South China Sea to Singapore - one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world - Burnett was attacked by pirates. However, with luck on his side, Burnett, who is a journalist and professional seaman, survived. Following this harrowing experience, Burnett was prompted to investigate further the world of modern-day piracy - world that is as shocking as it is terrifying. Dangerous Waters: Modern Piracy and Terror on the High Seas (Dutton, $24.95), provides an investigative look into maritime terrorism on the world's oceans. Burnett holds readers with his exploration of resurgence of piracy and also explains why this subject is increasing at such a rapid rate.

Seafarers' Trust Celebrates 30 Years With London Event

The ITF Seafarers’ Trust will celebrate its 30th birthday with a conference in London tomorrow exploring how best to provide for the welfare needs of the world’s seafarers in the 21st century. The event will share the experiences of the welfare community, unions and shipping industry, and explore new ways of helping seafarers. “The Trust has 30 years of experience to draw on and a superb network of people we’ve worked with who are leaders in this field, and many of them will be here tomorrow,” said Tom Holmer, administrative officer of the Seafarers’ Trust. “Legislative, social and technical factors mean that seafarers’ needs are changing, and we have to be ready to change to meet them.

Book Review:Danger on the High Seas

A tale of survival could best describe John S. Burnett's experience onboard his sloop Unicorn in January 1992. Sailing solo across the South China Sea to Singapore — one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world — Burnett was attacked by pirates. However, with luck on his side, Burnett, who is a journalist and professional seaman, survived. Following this harrowing experience, Burnett was prompted to investigate further the world of modern-day piracy — world that is as shocking as it is terrifying. Dangerous Waters: Modern Piracy and Terror on the High Seas (Dutton, $24.95), provides an investigative look into maritime terrorism on the world's oceans. Burnett holds readers with his exploration of resurgence of piracy and also explains why this subject is increasing at such a rapid rate.

UAESA Reverses Decision on Armed Security Teams

The tragic loss of life on board the S/V Quest last week, which saw four American citizens die at the hands of Somali pirates, has once again raised the issue of the use of force into the headlines. The killings come as the shipping industry reconsiders its position on the presence of weapons on board vessels, with the UAE Shipping Association (UAESA) reversing their decision against the use of private security guards aboard commercial vessels. In the case of the S/V Quest, it would appear that negotiations between US forces and the pirates went seriously wrong, with terrible consequences.

Increasing Maritime Piracy in Southeast Asia

Piracy in South East Asia (Pic: ReCAAP)

Does piracy off the coast of South-East Asia pose a threat? The answer is yes. Shipping lanes in Southeast Asia, one of the world’s busiest trade routes, have been hit by a “worrying new rise” in piracy. How is maritime piracy threatening South-East Asia and to what extent? Piracy is mushrooming in the area of the Strait of Malacca, Singapore Strait, Bangladesh, South China Sea and Vietnam, a shipping bottleneck that sees one-third of the world's annual commercial maritime traffic, making it the busiest waterway on earth.

Maritime Anti-Piracy, The Captain’s Guide Book

The fight against global piracy is as old as the seas themselves. Recent years have seen huge increases in pirate attacks against commercial shipping and, while the risk of piracy off East Africa is now believed to be somewhat diminished, the threat remains in the region and the cost to the global economy has been estimated to be as much as $6 billion by Oceans Beyond Piracy in their 2012 report. Piracy in West Africa and the South China Sea, meanwhile, is very much on the increase.

Allianz Piracy Study

Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS), an insurer of ships and cargo, has released a study suggesting its clients adapt their approach to marine insurance as the threat of piracy off the Horn of Africa continues to grow. In addition, the study points out that crews entering dangerous waters must be prepared to handle an attack, and it calls for a more coordinated solution to the current wave of piracy. In a study entitled “Piracy: An ancient risk with modern faces,” AGCS suggests that special war insurance policies should be used to meet the needs of ships in high risk areas. AGCS also identifies a number of practical responses that crews can take when passing through piracy zones…

BIMCO President Rages Over Kidnapping and Murder of Seafarers

A highly audible protest from the shipping industry against piracy – with a 30-second blast from ships’ sirens every day at noon, in every port in the world – has been recommended to draw public attention to the criminals who are now menacing world trade, and who are holding nearly 800 seafarers captive. Delivering the keynote address at this week’s Singapore conference of the Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery against ships in Asia (ReCAAP),…

Maritime Piracy Activity is at a 22-year Low -Report

In March 2017 fuel tanker Aris 13 was attacked by armed pirates off the coast of Somalia (Photo: EU NAVFOR)

Global maritime piracy activity fell to its lowest level in over two decades, according to the latest International Maritime Bureau (IMB) report. The 180 incidents of piracy and armed robbery against ships reported to the International Chamber of Commerce’s (ICC) IMB in 2017 was the lowest annual number since 1995, when 188 incidents were reported. According to the IMB, pirates boarded 136 vessels in 2017, while 22 attacks were attempted, 16 vessels fired upon and six vessels hijacked.

Modern Piracy & International Shipping ... the Challenge Continues

Tom Bowman

Travelling by ship, whether for trade, exploration or war, has been one of the most important parts of human history. As the global economy progressed and developed, the importance of shipping skyrocketed. While the advent of the car and plane heralded new eras of transportation, shipping has always been of vital importance to humanity. Vessels have changed dramatically over the years, but continue to be responsible for the bulk of international trade. However, piracy continues to be a major problem, and as developed in line with International Shipping.

Naval Coalitions Rely on TracPhone V7 for Counter-Piracy

Commercial ships are the most cost effective and fastest means of transporting goods globally but pirate activity is a significant threat that costs the world economy between $7 and $12 billion annually according to a recent estimate by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The Combined Maritime Forces (CMF), a coalition of 22 nations led by the United States, is now engaged in efforts to promote security and stability in response to the growing threat of piracy across approximately 2.5 million square miles of international waters in and around the Arabian Sea. However, executing effective strategies against piracy, terrorism…

Pirates Release Tanker and Crew in Gulf of Guinea

MT Barrett (Photo: Union Maritime)

Product tanker MT Barrett has been released and all crew are safe following a six-day piracy incident in the Gulf of Guinea, U.K. based Union Maritime has confirmed. Union Maritime said it lost communications with its 11,999-dwt product tanker while the vessel was at anchor off Benin, West Africa on the morning of January 10, after which the company immediately implemented its emergency response plan and alerted regional maritime authorities and other vessels. A resolution process began when the pirates holding the MT Barrett made contact with the Union Maritime late on January 12.

Counter-Piracy Force Boosted by New High-speed Patrol Craft

Patrol Boat 'ESPS Relampago': Photo credit EUNAVFOR

Specialised Spanish counter-piracy patrol vessel joins EU Naval Force in Gulf of Aden. The EU’s counter piracy task force (EUNAVFOR) has been augmented by the addition of the offshore patrol vessel ESPS RELAMPAGO of the Spanish Navy. The addition of RELAMPAGO to the counter piracy mission heralds a new generations of smaller, highly adaptable vessels which will be able to use their high speed and modern equipment to monitor ever increasing portions of the high risk area. •    Control of environmental legislation and anti-pollution.

Int’l Anti-Terrorism & Piracy Course Graduation

Six students from, Nigeria, Seychelles, Jordan and Sierra Leone graduated from the U.S. Navy’s International Anti-Terrorism and Piracy Course during a ceremony held aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola Dec 17. The four-week course conducted at the Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity (NETSAFA) International Training Center (NITC) provides information on the latest developments in anti-terrorism and piracy initiatives, and equips students with skills to help develop national programs addressing these issues. During the ceremony class leader Lt. Cmdr. Philip Juana from the Sierra Leon Maritime Force addressed the audience, reflecting on the course and his stay in America. “The aspect of anti-terrorism was a very enlightening package.

Oxberry Risk Maritime Continues to Expand Services

Oxberry Risk Maritime continues to expand its maritime security and anti-piracy services. Oxberry Risk Maritime believes that identification and management of risk is a vital aspect of modern maritime business. Dynamic growth in an ever expanding market requires dynamic solutions to meet and exceed expectations. Oxberry Risk Maritime is responding to the demands of maritime and shipping sector organisations through the delivery of comprehensive maritime security and anti-piracy…

From Security to Efficiency Modern Vessel Tracking

Nick Farrell

More so than many other fields of business, the maritime industry is focused on cost, which in turn gives the appearance of being conservative towards technology. Of course, we have magnificently technical ships operating with equipment that wouldn’t look out of place in a NASA lab, but in general, it can take decades for a technology to become mainstream. Unless it becomes mandated by the IMO. Vessel tracking is a partial exception to the rule though, with many fleet owners realizng its potential for more cost-effective operation and improved vessel and personnel security.

Petro-Pirates Plague Busy SE Asia Lanes

In the dead of night, as his fuel tanker sailed through the narrowest section of one of the world's busiest waterways, Captain Thiwa Saman was wrenched from sleep and pitched into a waking nightmare. Three men with guns and swords were banging on his cabin door. Other pirates had already stormed the bridge, seized the duty officer and smashed up the radio and GPS equipment. Over the next 10 hours, mostly in daylight, the pirates held Thiwa and his 13 crew captive while siphoning off 4 million litres of diesel, worth around $2 million on the black market, to another tanker. They even re-painted the name of Thiwa's ship to confuse anyone searching for it. Then they vanished.

Spanish Warship Joins Maritime Piracy Fight

A Spanish warship ESPS Rayo will be deployed in the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden for the next six months. ESPS Rayo is part of Spain's contribution to the European Union's fight against piracy. Spanish Navy warship, ESPS Rayo recently joined the EU Naval Force (EU Navfor) and will be deployed in the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden for the next six months. The warship is part of Spain’s contribution to the European Union’s (EU) fight against piracy in the Horn of Africa. ESPS Rayo is a modern, multipurpose Oceanic Patrol Vessel (OPV), capable of accomplishing a wide range of operational tasks. Commissioned to the Spanish Navy in May 2012, the ship has a displacement of 2,500 tonnes, is 95m long and, for this counterpiracy mission, has a crew of 83 on board.

Recent Nigerian Piracy Kidnapping Flags a Caution

Somali pirates arrested: Photo courtesy of EUNAVFOR

“Security in this region [off the coast of Nigeria] is often not sufficient,” says maritime piracy attorney Dennis McElwee “Unfortunately, maritime companies are not always taking the necessary precautions to protect crewmembers from this type of attack.” There are many dangers of working at sea, but McElwee said that U.S. employers are obligated to take sufficient safety measures for their employees. In a recent case most of the crewmembers were released unharmed, but the ship’s captain and engineer -- both Americans -- were taken hostage, later to be released after payment of ransom.

Japanese FM Visits Colombo Port

SLPA Chairman Dr. Parakrama Dissanayake presenting a token of goodwill to Minister of Foreign Affairs of Japan Taro Kono while also seen are Ambassador of Japan Kenichi Suganuma and SLPA Vice Chairman P.G. Dasanayake. Photo: Sri Lanka Ports Authority

Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono has visited the port of Colombo in Sri Lanka. Kono was briefed by Sri Lankan government officials about a project under consideration to expand the port. The Japanese Foreign Minister  also visited the newly built control tower and the Colombo Port Expansion Project currently known as the Colombo south Port. Colombo is the largest port in Sri Lanka, which is a strategically important point in Indian Ocean sea lanes. Taro Kono was briefed by the Chairman of Sri Lanka Ports Authority (SLPA) Dr.

Renowned Piracy Negotiator Calls On Maritime Industry To Educate The Public On Piracy Threat

March 21 2011—Stamford, CT. In recognition of the International Maritime Organization’s “Year of Piracy”, WISTA USA hosted world renowned piracy negotiator, Suzanne Williams QPM, as their keynote speaker at its sixth annual WISTA USA luncheon on Monday, kicking off the Connecticut Maritime Association’s Shipping 2011 conference. The luncheon was attended by nearly 250 industry professionals and maritime cadets. Ms. Williams described first hand experiences in her dealings with pirate negotiations, and offered suggestions for combating the scourge.

Digital Approach to Maritime Piracy Issues

A Scottish company has launched onto the global shipping market the first comprehensive software product designed to combat the increasing problem of modern-day piracy at sea. •    The cost of piracy in 2011 is estimated at $7 billion / £4.46 billion (including increased security spend and ransom payments). •    The numbers of hostages and size of individual ransom demands also increased over the same period. Marine MTS, based in Aberdeen, has developed Sentinel, which tracks user vessels remotely. As well as helping the user plot a safe route through problem areas, the software will automatically alert emergency or military services should something unusual happen on board.

GOGL Acquires New Vessel

File Photo: Golden Ocean Group Ltd

Norway based dry bulk shipping company Golden Ocean Group Limited (GOGL) has  taken delivery of the second vessel, Sea Monterrey (to be renamed Golden Monterrey). On October 16, 2017 GOGL announced that it has entered into agreements to acquire two modern Capesize vessels from affiliates of Hemen Holding Limited, a company indirectly controlled by trusts established by John Fredriksen for the benefit of his immediate family (Hemen), the Company's largest shareholder, at a purchase price of USD 43.0 million per vessel. The first vessel, Golden Behike, was delivered in November 2017.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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