Marine Link
Monday, January 22, 2018

Moves Ahead News

Seaway Workers Ratify Contract

The agreement provides for annual wage increases of 3%, 3% and 3.25% over the three-year span of the contract, one additional paid holiday in February, and increases to shift and skilled trade allowances. The contract includes the necessary flexibility for the Corporation to move ahead with the development of new technology, which is expected to improve the system’s productivity and increase worker safety.

NCL Halves Cruise Ship Order

According to a Reuters report, Star Cruises unit Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) has cancelled its order for a second F3 cruise ship from shipbuilding group STX Europe, but will move ahead with the first order, STX said on Dec. 18. This 150,000 ton F3 cruise ship, which will be built by STX Europe's French shipyard, will carry a total of 4,200 passenger. Delivery is expected in late May 2010, as originally scheduled. (Source: Reuters)

Arctic Shipbuilding Program Not Iced

According to an August 18 report from the Ottawa Citizen, the Candian Defence Department will run some tests at the end of the month on a model of a proposed new Arctic patrol vessel but there is still no indication of when it will approach the shipbuilding industry to move ahead with the $3b program. (Source: Ottawa Citizen)  

U.S. Offshore Wind Projects Move Closer To Reality

Dow Jones reported that deal making and development in the wind arena continue even as the economy slows down, with the federal government moving ahead to grant leases for the U.S.'s first offshore wind projects in history and other state-based projects moving to the front burner. Comments on federal rules to govern a host of alternative energy projects proposed in federal waters off the coast of the drew about 225 responses by Monday's deadline, as the U.S. Mineral Management Service, or MMS, moves ahead with plans to lease the outer continental shelf to several companies. Maureen Bornholdt, program manager of the MMS offshore alternative energy program, said the Interior Department remains on track to complete drafting the rules by the end of the year, wrapping up a three-year process.

Littoral Combat Ship 'USS Freedom' Fit for Service

Some design problems persist, some fixes remain to be made, but overall, the littoral combat ship Freedom is moving ahead to meet its deployment schedule for next spring, the commander of the Navy’s surface forces proclaimed. “My assessment is the ship is sound, the engineering plant is good, combat systems are good,” said Vice Adm. Richard Hunt. That verdict came after a three-day “special trial” conducted May 22-24 at San Diego by the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey, or INSURV. Nearly 200 people rode the ship — normally crewed by 40 sailors — to test the Freedom’s combat, communications and engineering systems; minutely examine the ship’s physical condition; and put the vessel through a series of ship-handling evolutions.

Panama Canal CEO Briefs Miami Leadership

Panama Canal Authority (ACP) Administrator/CEO Alberto Alemán Zubieta briefed government and business leaders on the progress of the Panama Canal Expansion Program at an event in Miami, Fla. on Nov. 6. Alemán Zubieta confirmed expansion is moving ahead on-time, on-budget and will facilitate trade between the Port of Miami and the Panama Canal. “Expansion is moving ahead as planned and will build a new lane of traffic along the Canal through the construction of a new set of locks. Anticipated to be complete by 2014, the project will double the waterway’s capacity and allow more traffic and wider ships to transit,” said Alemán Zubieta.

Singapore Continues to Harmonize LNG Bunkering Standards

MoU inked to further efforts to facilitate uptake of LNG for the future. Photo:  Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore

To develop the world’s first set of harmonised LNG bunkering standards, a network comprising Antwerp, Rotterdam, Singapore and Zeebrugge, subsequently expanded to include Jacksonville and Norway, was formed. Taking reference from documents by organisations such as the International Association of Ports and Harbours (IAPH), the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) and the Society for Gas as a Marine Fuel (SGMF), this set of harmonised standards  will ensure that key areas of the LNG bunkering process are aligned across ports carrying out LNG bunkering operations.

When It Comes to Shipping, Norway Forks in the Road

Representing the new owners of Norwegian shipping company Bergesen, Andreas Sohmen-Pao delivered a clear message in his well received speech at the Annual Meeting of the NSA Tank and Bulkship Group last week. Sohmen-Pao told industry members, which had turned out in record numbers, that he thought Norway was at a crossroads when it came to shipping. Politicians had to decide whether to give the shipping industry equal treatment with that enjoyed by competitors internationally, and the industry itself had to decide whether to continue to actively develop the Norwegian shipping cluster or not. "As we all know, Norway took bold steps in tax reform for shipping in 1996, with favorable results.

ABS Approval Advances Tension Leg Platform Concept

Photo: ABS

ABS granted approval in principle (AIP) for a Tension Leg Platform (DSTLP500) design developed by Dalian Shipbuilding Industry Co., Ltd. (DSIC). “ABS and DSIC have a long relationship and have worked closely on a broad range of offshore projects, semi-submersible units, jackups and drill ships,” said ABS Executive Vice President for Global Offshore Kenneth Richardson. “Gaining ABS approval is an important step in helping bring this project closer to realization,” said Wenmin Liu, China Ship Design Master and Senior Offshore Technical Expert DSIC.

Juneau Moves Ahead with $50m Dock Plan

According to reports, Juneau leaders on continued to move forward with plans for a $50m cruise ship dock improvement plan that would allow two modern ships to dock at the same time by 2010. To do that, Port Director John Stone said some fees will increase dramatically. The city's Docks and Harbors Board is proposing construction of a floating berth in front of the current cruise ship dock that would accommodate two big ships. Use of the city dock now costs a ship 5.5 cents per ton to dock, but paying for the new improvements will boost that to 30 cents a ton. Other fees will change, however, including some going down. As an example, Stone said that means the new 1,868-passenger, 951-foot cruise ship Zuiderdam, which now costs $20,394 to dock in Juneau, would cost $28,233 in 2010.

MOL to Scrap 5 Double Hull Tankers

Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. has decided to scrap five double-hull tankers (four VLCCs, one Suezmax) by the end of March 2012. Scrapping of two vessels is already completed, and preparations are under way to start dismantling the other three. All five tankers were crude carriers launched before 1998. MOL, as one of the world’s leading crude oil transport operators, is moving ahead to rejuvenate its fleet, upgrade the quality of its services, and solidify its position in the market, where it expects mid- and long-term growth. Meanwhile, the vessels will be scrapped at yards that conform to the “Guidelines to sell vessels for scrapping from an environmental viewpoint” stipulated by MOL.

Is DD-21 Project In Trouble?

According to a report in the NY Times and circulated by the major wire services, the U.S. Navy's proposed DD- 21 class of destroyers may be endangered. The Congressional Budget Office has predicted that the Pentagon budget will have to grow by as much as $70 billion a year to maintain existing weapons systems while moving ahead with new ones such as the DD-21, while President-elect George Bush has proposed increasing military spending by $4.5 billion a year over the next decade, the Times said. The Times said the new administration likely will have to cancel or postpone some major defense programs in development, such as the Air Force's F-22 stealth fighter, made by Lockheed- Martin Corp., the Marine Corp's V-22 Osprey aircraft, a joint project of Textron Inc.

Canadian Navy Puts Out Tenders for Floating Barrier

The Canadian navy is moving ahead with plans to build a floating fence around its dockyards in Halifax, according to a CBC News report. Currently, there is no physical barrier stopping any boat from targeting the navy's 22 major warships in Halifax and Esquimalt on the West Coast. The navy hopes a two-meter-high barrier will prevent attacks like the one in Yemen in 2000, when a small boat loaded with explosives rammed into the American warship USS Cole. Seventeen sailors were killed and 39 injured. The navy has put out tenders for the $3.5-million fence, which will stretch 1.5 kilometers in Halifax Harbor and rest about 100 meters from the vessels. The navy has yet to select the design of the floating fence. But work could start as early as March. (Source: CBC News)

NJ Congressmen Supports Offshore Wind Proposal

Offshore wind farm: File photo

Congressman Frank Pallone has issued the following statement in response to the Department of the Interior’s announcement of the proposed lease sale for nearly 344,000 acres off of the New Jersey coast for commercial wind energy development. “I am pleased that the Department of the Interior is moving ahead to pursue energy development in the Atlantic from renewable resources. Here in New Jersey, we are uniquely positioned to take advantage of our vast coastline to produce clean, renewable energy.

S. Korea Readies Viking Anti-submarine Planes

Image: Fas.org

South Korea is moving ahead to introduce refurbished S-3 Viking anti-submarine warfare (ASW) planes to counter threats from North Korea, Yonhap reported quoting a military source. The proposal to incorporate 12 former U.S. Navy Vikings into service was approved late last month by a military program review group,  say sources. The latest development comes after the Navy proposed taking over 20 Vikings that have been kept in storage since 2009 to shore up the country's detection and attack capabilities against Pyongyang's submarine fleet.

MOL Subsidiary to Build Ro-Pax Ferries

Ro-Pax(roll onroll off passenger)ferries.

Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. announced that its group company Ferry Sunflower Limited is moving ahead with plans to construct two large-scale Ro-Pax (roll on/roll off passenger) ferries. The newbuilding ferries will be delivered in March and June of 2018 as replacements for the Sunflower Satsuma and Sunflower Kirishima, which serve on the route connecting Osaka Port (Osaka Prefecture) and Shibushi Port (Kagoshima Prefecture). The new ferries will feature private staterooms with toilets, showers, washbasins, and refrigerators, allowing passengers to enjoy their trips in greater comfort.

APM Terminals Wraps Up TCB Acquisition

TCB Barcelona container terminal photo APM

APM Terminals has completed the USD 1 billion acquisition of Spanish Grup Maritim TCB’s port and rail interests. APM Terminals has yet to receive approval for three of 11 terminals under Grup Maritim TCB, but has decided to move ahead with the acquisition, as the remaining terminals constitute less than 5% of the value of the acquisition. The acquisition thus adds 8 ports with a combined 2 million TEU equity-weighted volume to APM Terminals, expanding the network to 72 operating ports, across 69 countries.

Aker Arctic Brings Oblique Ice Breaker to Market

With construction underway on the first ever Oblique Icebreaker, research specialist Aker Arctic Technology  has unveiled a new version of the vessel type that will bring ice management and pollution control in thick first year ice to a new level. The first ARC 100  is due delivery to the Russian Ministry of Transport in early 2014, after a collaborative build involving Kaliningrad’s OJSC Yantar and Helsinki’s Arctech yards. The resulting newbuilding is a breakthrough in asymmetric three-thruster conceptual design…

Survey Guidelines Bring US Closer to Atlantic Oil Reseves

The Obama administration on Thursday laid out a framework for assessing the amount of crude off the Atlantic coast, another step toward possibly allowing oil production in an area that has been out of reach for decades. The plan was released as part of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management's (BOEM) final environmental review of the possible impacts of seismic testing to gauge oil reserves in the Atlantic Ocean. If approved, the proposal would require measures aimed at avoiding vessel strikes of marine animals, the closure of certain areas to protect the migration path of the endangered North Atlantic Right Whale, and the use of underwater microphones to improve detection of marine mammals during seismic airgun surveys.

MOL Develops Voyage Information Display System

Image of AR displays of voyage information: MOL

Mitsui O.S.K. Lines (MOL) announced an agreement with Furuno Electric Co and MOL Techno-Trade to jointly develop a system that supports ship operation during voyages using augmented reality (AR) technology. In this project, information, such as other ships sailing around the vessel and landmarks like buoys at sea, can be shown on tablets and other displays, based on data from the Automatic Identification System (AIS). Images of landscapes taken from the bridge can also be shown on the same tablets…

Stopping Cruise Ship Pollution in Asia

Pic: Stop Cruise Ship Pollution Org

While many Asian ports restrict ships’ sulfur emissions, the level is far higher than limits in the U.S. and Europe, says a report in the WSJ. Many popular destinations, including Singapore, Australia and several of the Pacific Islands, apply international maritime guidelines restricting ships’ emissions of sulfur—a pollutant associated with acid rain—to 3.5% of fuel volume. But that is 35 times the U.S. and European limit. Activists have been urging regulators to mandate stricter standards, but they say that in the meantime multinational cruise companies such as Carnival Corp.

Sullivan Outlines Direction for NAVSEA

WASHINGTON - Vice Adm. Paul Sullivan, commander of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) outlined his focus areas for NAVSEA and its affiliated Program Executive Offices (PEOs Ships, Carriers, Submarines, Integrated Warfare Systems and Littoral and Mine Warfare) 15 Aug. During a meeting with flag officers and senior executives, Sullivan discussed his message that will underscore his areas of focus during his first 90 days as commander. "Everything we do should focus on putting capabilities in the hands of the war fighter," said Sullivan. Sullivan credited former-commander Vice Adm. Phillip Balisle, who retired June 6, for setting the stage for NAVSEA's future. "We have many challenges ahead," said Sullivan, "...but we are so much farther along because of Vice Adm.

Bethea to Lead Jasper Port Board

Members of the bi-state board leading the development of a deepwater port in Jasper County unanimously elected William L. Bethea Jr. of Hilton Head, South Carolina, to chair the Jasper Ocean Terminal Joint Project Office (JPO) on Feb. The chairman serves a one-year term and alternates between the two states. James S. Balloun of Georgia served as JPO chairman in 2008 and was elected vice chairman at the meeting. Bethea served for 12 years on the South Carolina State Ports Authority (SCSPA) Board, four of those years as chairman, and has served on the South Carolina Coordinating Council for Economic Development. “This project is vitally important to the economic future of our region and the state of South Carolina,” said Bethea.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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