Marine Link
Saturday, January 20, 2018

Navy Cruiser News

Navy Cruiser Blast Injures 6, 1 Critically

An explosion in the hull of a Navy cruiser during routine maintenance left six workers injured one of them critically with life-threatening burns, authorities said according to an Associated Press report. Subcontractors from the National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. were working in the fuel tank of the USS Lake Champlain as it sat in dry dock when the explosion occurred just after noon for reasons not yet determined. Four of the workers were taken to UC San Diego Medical Center. One remained in critical condition Sunday afternoon, according to the report. Two more workers reportedly had been discharged and one was in the process of being discharged. Two others were reportedly treated at the scene of the explosion and released. [Source: AP]

Raytheon Gets $72.8M Navy Contract

The AP reported that military contractor Raytheon Co. said it got a $72.8m contract from the U.S. Navy to provide the Royal Australian Navy with radar equipment. Raytheon's Integrated Defense Systems unit will provide system transmitters, hardware and spares for radar systems on three Air Warfare Destroyer ships. The work will be done at Raytheon plants in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Components of the radar system are already in use on U.S. Navy cruisers and destroyers.

Navy Signs $72.8M Contract

Military contractor Raytheon Co. landed a $72.8m contract from the U.S. Navy to provide the Royal Australian Navy with radar equipment. Raytheon's Integrated Defense Systems unit will provide system transmitters, hardware and spares for radar systems on three Air Warfare Destroyer ships. The work will be done at Raytheon plants in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Components of the radar system are already in use on U.S. Navy cruisers and destroyers. (Source: Ninemsn)

Navy Cruiser Arrives At Bender For Repair Work

Bender Shipbuilding & Repair Co. signed a contract for the drydocking and repair of USS Yorktown. The Ticonderoga Class Guided Missile Cruiser, which was built at Ingalls in 1982 has a workscope of standard drydocking items and shaft repairs. The vessel arrived at Bender on November 12, where it will remain until December 1.

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – January 13

1853- The ship Cornelius Grinnell grounded in a heavy surf off Squan Beach New Jersey. A surf car was used to rescue all 234 persons on board. 1925- Alaskan Game Law enforced by Coast Guard. 1918-Surfmen from the Humboldt Bay Lifesaving Station rescued the 430-man crew of the Navy cruiser USS Milwaukee after the cruiser ran aground. 1982- Air Florida Flight 90 crashed onto the 14th Street Bridge and then into the Potomac River in Washington, D.C., during a heavy snow storm. Coast Guard units, including the cutters Capstan and Madrona, divers from the Atlantic Strike Team, a helicopter from AIRSTA Elizabeth City, personnel from Curtis Bay, and reservists from Station Washington, assisted in the rescue of the five surviving passengers and the recovery of the aircraft's wreckage.

This Day in Coast Guard History – Jan. 13

1853- The ship Cornelius Grinnell grounded in a heavy surf off Squan Beach New Jersey. A surf car was used to rescue all 234 persons on board. 1925- Alaskan Game Law enforced by Coast Guard. 1918-Surfmen from the Humboldt Bay Lifesaving Station rescued the 430-man crew of the Navy cruiser USS Milwaukee after the cruiser ran aground. 1982- Air Florida Flight 90 crashed onto the 14th Street Bridge and then into the Potomac River in Washington, D.C., during a heavy snow storm. Coast Guard units, including the cutters Capstan and Madrona, divers from the Atlantic Strike Team, a helicopter from AIRSTA Elizabeth City, personnel from Curtis Bay, and reservists from Station Washington, assisted in the rescue of the five surviving passengers and the recovery of the aircraft's wreckage.

Sperry Marine Gets Contract

The U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command has awarded a contract to Northrop Grumman Corporation  to supply integrated bridge systems (IBS) for three U.S. Navy cruisers. The indefinite-delivery indefinite-quantity contract, valued at $2.72m, was awarded to Northrop Grumman’s Sperry Marine business unit. Under the contract, the new-generation IBS, running on Sperry Marine’s Voyage Management System (VMS) software, will be back-fitted onto three guided-missile cruisers (CG). Sperry Marine has supplied similar VMS-based integrated navigation systems for hundreds of commercial vessels worldwide, including tankers, container ships, bulk carriers and passenger cruise ships.

Today in U.S. Naval History: May 7

Japanese aircraft carrier Shoho is torpedoed, during attacks by U.S. Navy carrier aircraft in the late morning of 7 May 1942. Photographed from a USS Lexington (CV-2) plane. (Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives.)

1942 - Carrier aircraft sink Japanese carrier Shoho during Battle of Coral Sea. The first day of the carrier battle of Coral Sea, May 7 1942, saw the Americans searching for carriers they knew were present and the Japanese looking for ones they feared might be in the area. The opposing commanders, U.S. Rear Admiral Frank Jack Fletcher and Japanese Vice Admiral Takeo Takagi and Rear Admiral Tadaichi Hara, endeavored to "get in the first blow", a presumed prerequisite to victory (and to survival) in a battle between heavily-armed and lightly-protected aircraft carriers.

This Day in U.S. Naval History: May 1

Battle of Manila Bay, 1 May 1898. Contemporary colored print showing USS Olympia in the left foreground, leading the U.S. Asiatic Squadron in destroying the Spanish fleet off Cavite. A vignette portrait of Rear Admiral George Dewey is featured in the lower left. (U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph)

Before dawn on May 1, 1898, Commodore George Dewey's flagship Olympia led seven U.S. Navy cruisers and gunboats into Manila Bay. By 8 AM that morning Dewey's Asiatic Squadron had located and destroyed virtually the entire Spanish naval force in the Philippines. Damage to the American ships was negligible, and their crews suffered no fatalities and few injuries. The Battle of Manila Bay was a singular demonstration of the daring and decisive application of sea power. In a few hours, Dewey had eliminated any threat that the Spanish Navy might pose to U.S.

Canadian Navy Oiler on Tow Following Engine Room Fire

HMCS Protecteur (centre): Earlier photo courtesy of Canadian Government

The Canadian Navy Fleet Replenishment ship 'HMCS Protecteur' has been taken in tow in rough seas by  the U.S. navy cruiser USS Chosin, after an engine fire left it drifting some 600 km from Pearl Harbor, reports CBC News. Citing Commodore Bob Auchterlonie, the commander of Canada's Pacific naval fleet, CBC reports that the USS Michael Murphy, is accompanying Protecteur as the ships make their way at five knots or less [9 km/h] toward Pearl Harbor, 630 km away. In addition the fleet ocean tug USNS Sioux is also on station near Protecteur should problems arise.

USN AEGIS Cruiser Modernization Program

frigate USS Ingraham (FFG 61) during a leap frog training exercise. The exercise allows ship handlers to practice the approach and stabilization alongside and a breakaway in a simulated underway replenishment environment. Ingraham and Antietam are part of the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) Carrier Strike Group on deployment in the Western Pacific Ocean. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Jeremie Kerns. By Edward H. The U.S. Navy’s “Cruiser Modernization” program will extend…

Feature: Adding Combat Power; Extending Ship Life

By Edward H. The U.S. Navy's "Cruiser Modernization" program will extend the service life and enhance the combat capability of 22 of the Navy's 27 multi-mission AEGIS cruisers (CG-52 through CG-73). The Cruiser Modernization is necessary to enable the CG-47 class to participate effectively in support of joint littoral campaigns. Missions include land attack, littoral undersea warfare, force protection, and anti-air defense, as well as allowing for a possible future Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) mission. The program extends the service life of each ship to 35 years. Combat systems will be upgraded while crew size and maintenance requirements will be reduced.

U.S. Navy’s Last Gun Cruiser Goes To Scrapyard

The last all-gun cruiser in the U.S. Navy’s inventory is finally headed for the scrapyard. The cruiser Des Moines began the long tow to Texas on Aug. 21 from a storage facility in Philadelphia, where it had been kept for 45 years. Although the Navy planned to get rid of the ship more than a decade ago, disposal was put off while several preservation groups attempted to preserve the Des Moines as a museum ship. None of those efforts came to fruition, and the Navy decided in May to scrap the ship. On Aug. 21 — the same day the ship left Philadelphia — a $924,000 contract to dismantle the Des Moines was awarded to ESCO Marine of Brownsville, Texas. Under tow by the Navy salvage ship Grasp, the Des Moines is expected to arrive in Brownsville around Sept.

Lockheed Martin Awarded $20.8M Contract

The U.S. Aegis Combat System upgrade ship-set for a cruiser modernization program. operational cost efficiency of up to 22 existing Aegis-equipped cruisers. installed aboard by USS Bunker Hill (CG 52). at Wallops Island and Dahlgren, VA. "The cruiser modernization program is critical to the sustainment of U.S. the Department of Defense," said Capt. Executive Office for Ships. the 1980s and early 1990s. incorporate commercial off-the-shelf equipment and open systems architecture. Deepwater programs. is supporting the U.S. surface ships. component of the sea-based element of the U.S. System. advanced computer-controlled radar system. threat environment in naval warfare.

CNO: Sea Power Too Narrowly Defined, Navy to Expand Missions

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), Adm. Mike Mullen, addressed members of the Surface Navy Association (SNA) Jan. 10 at their 18th Annual National Symposium held at the Hyatt Regency in Arlington, Va. Addressing the SNA for the first time since taking the helm as CNO, Mullen said the Navy’s view of sea power needed to expand, incorporating both traditional and nontraditional missions. "I believe sea power as a notion has become way too narrowly defined," Mullen said. Mullen called for a balanced fleet with the capability to win the big and small wars. "I have probably talked to upwards of 15,000 Sailors in the course of more than a half-dozen trips at sea and ashore. And the vast majority were involved in operations I would consider green or brown water in nature," he explained.

Lockheed Gets $5.7m Navy Deal

The U.S. Navy awarded a $5.7m contract modification to a unit of Lockheed Martin Corp. Lockheed Martin Maritime Systems and Sensors will deliver cruiser modernization hardware to the Navy, which will be installed on the USS Mobile Bay and USS Philippine Sea in 2009. The cruiser program is critical to the maintenance of the Navy's force structure and the successes of current and future Pentagon missions, the Navy said. The company will complete the work in Moorestown, N.J. and Ferrol, Spain through September 2009. Source: AP

USN to Decommission 11 Ships

USS Klakring: Photo credit USN

US warships, eleven in number comprising six frigates, four cruisers and an aircraft carrier are set to be decommissioned during fiscal 2013, according to a Navy message released by Deputy Chief of Naval Operations Vice-Admiral John Blake, which includes deactivation dates and the fates of the ships. The six frigates will be sold to foreign militaries, while the four cruisers will be dismantled. USS Enterprise, the world’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the oldest active-duty warship in the fleet, will move to a shipyard March 15, next year.

Ships Slated for Retirement Should be Retained – House Republicans

Ticonderoga-class 'USS Cowpens': Photo credit USN

The Navy will have to upgrade and keep three of four Ticonderoga-class cruisers the service planned to retire in 2013, according to proposed legislation released by House Republicans. The proposal by House Armed Services readiness subcommittee chairman Randy Forbes, R-Va., would keep the Cowpens, Anzio and Vicksburg in the fleet by authorizing needed upgrades. The Navy had planned to retire all three, along with the Port Royal, on March 31, 2013, and three more the following year to meet congressionally mandated budget cuts and to save an expected $4.1 billion.

US, Chinese Navy Carry Out Joint Communication Drills

The visiting Chinese missile cruiser 113 (Qingdao) and U.S. missile cruiser 93 (Zhongyun) cooperated on a six-hour marine communication and mobile drill near Hawaii on September 10. This is the first time the U.S. and Chinese and navies have cooperated on such drills. The drills were directed in turn by the U.S. and Chinese navy. They trialed several means of communication and organized their vessels into joint formations. During the drills, the U.S. and Chinese navies each had two of their own observers on the other's ships to view and evaluate the giving of orders and drills. The drills were held after the Chinese navy left Hawaii. The ships left Pearl Harbor for San Diego on the U.S. mainland at 10 a.m. on September 10. (Source: People's Daily Online)

This Day in Coast Guard History – August 9

1942- The Coast Guard-manned transport USS Hunter Liggett rescued the survivors of the heavy cruisers USS Vincennes, Astoria, and Quincy and the Australian cruiser HMAS Canberra that had been sunk the preceding night by Imperial Japanese Navy warships during the Battle of Savo Island. The night battle, also known as the First Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, was one of the worst defeats ever suffered by the U.S. Navy. 1950- Congress enacted Public Law 679, which charged the Coast Guard with the function of port security. 1982- Secretary of Defense Caspar W. Weinberger approved the use of Coast Guard law enforcement detachments on board Navy vessels during peace-time. The teams conducted law enforcement boardings from Navy vessels for the first time in history.

US Navy Warns Congress that Piecemeal Cruiser Upgrades Costly

U.S. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus on Thursday warned that congressional plans for a piecemeal modernization of 11 cruisers would cost billions of dollars more than the Navy's original plan and meant the warships would have to be retired earlier. "They will still be under the command of the CNO (Chief of Naval Operations). They will never go out of commission," he told reporters after a speech at the National Press Club. Mabus said the Navy remained in dialogue with Congress about the issue, and would gladly accept congressional language aimed at ensuring modernization was actually completed. For instance, he said Congress could impose financial penalties if the Navy reneged on the plan, or require it to sign contracts with U.S. shipyards for upgrade work.

This Day in Naval History – July 19

1812 - USS Constitution escapes from British squadron after 3 day chase off New Jersey 1886 - Atlanta, the first steel-hulled American cruiser armed with breechloading rifled guns, is commissioned. 1897 - LT Robert E. Peary departs on year long Arctic Expedition which makes many important discoveries, including one of largest meteorites, Cape York. 1918 - Armored cruiser USS San Diego sunk off Fire Island, NY by a mine laid by U-156. 1940 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs second Naval Expansion Act. (Source: Navy News Service)

Northrop Grumman Awarded $58.4M Navy Contract

The U.S. Navy has awarded Northrop Grumman Corporation a $58.4m contract to continue life cycle engineering and technical services in support of the Navy's fleet of USS Ticonderoga (CG 47) class Aegis guided missile cruisers. The company's Ship Systems sector will perform the work in Pascagoula, and provide waterfront support in various U.S. Navy ports. This is projected to be a five-year program. The contract award is for the first year; four one-year options are to follow. Northrop Grumman will provide engineering services and material procurement work in support of the maintenance and modernization efforts on CG 47 class ships. With lead work being performed in Pascagoula…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

Subscribe
Maritime Reporter E-News subscription

Maritime Reporter E-News is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for Maritime Reporter E-News