Marine Link
Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Navy Officer News

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – January 17

1832- Treasury Secretary Louis McLane discontinued the practice of hiring "unemployed" Navy officers as senior Revenue Cutter Service officers.  All vacancies were to be filled by promotions within the service.  This was a tremendous boost to morale among Revenue cuttermen as they had long complained about the slow line of promotion, as unemployed Navy officers grabbed up senior positions. 1972-CGC Storis seized two Soviet fishing vessels, the 362-foot factory vessel Lamut and the 278-foot stern trawler Kolyvan, for fishing inside the 12-mile U.S. contiguous zone. 1994- Coast Guard units and family members assisted those in need after an earthquake hit Los Angeles, California. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)

BIW's Top Navy Officer Relieved of Duty

The top Navy officer in Bath who oversees destroyer construction at Bath Iron Works has been permanently relieved of his duties following an official inquiry. Capt. Michael Stanton, who served as the Navy's supervisor of shipbuilding at BIW, has been replaced. Last month, the Navy announced that Stanton had been placed on paid administrative leave while officials conducted an inquiry of an unspecified nature. Stanton, who assumed command of SupShip on Aug. 5, 2004, is responsible for overseeing construction of the multi- million-dollar guided missile destroyers that are built by BIW. He also supervises about 184 military and civilian employees who work at SupShip offices in Bath and Brunswick.

US Wants Japan to Patrol South China Sea

Courtesy: Japanese Ministry of Defense

Admiral Robert Thomas, senior U.S. Navy officer and commander of the Seventh Fleet and the top U.S. navy officer in Asia, has told Reuters that the United States would welcome operations conducted by the Japanese Self-Defense Forces in the South China Sea. The comments are in line with broader U.S. support for Japan’s military playing a more global role. US would back any moves by Japan to extend air patrols into the South China Sea as a counterweight to a growing fleet of Chinese vessels pushing Beijing's territorial claims in the region.

Navy Officer Pleads Guilty to Bribery

U.S. A lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy pleaded guilty to bribery charges in federal court, admitting that he accepted cash, hotel expenses and the services of a prostitute in return for providing classified U.S. Navy ship schedules and other internal Navy information to an executive of a defense contracting firm. Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Laura E. Duffy of the Southern District of California, Deputy Inspector General for Investigations James B. Burch of the Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS), Director Andrew L. Traver of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) and Director Anita Bales of the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) made the announcement.

12 Found Alive after Indonesian Ferry Sinking

The Guardian reported that rescuers found a six-year-old boy and 11 other survivors clinging to an oil rig yesterday, days after an Indonesian ferry sank, leaving more than 400 dead or missing, navy officers said. The survivors, described as weak after spending more than four days in the Java Sea, were picked up by the navy 120 miles from where the ferry sank in a storm, said navy spokesman Lt Col Tony Syaiful. The 12, among them a woman, arrived at a port in Surabaya city and were rushed to hospital. source: The Guardian

Ex-US Navy Officers Face Negligent Homicide Charges over Ship Collisions

Significant visible damage to USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on Aug. 21. (U.S. Navy photo by Madailein Abbott)

The commanding officers of two U.S. Navy destroyers involved in deadly collisions last year in the Pacific Ocean face courts-martial and military criminal charges including negligent homicide, the U.S. Navy said in a statement on Tuesday. Filing charges against the officers marks the Navy’s latest effort to address the problems that led to collisions involving its warships in Asia, in which 17 sailors were killed. The Navy has already dismissed several senior officers, including the commander of the Seventh Fleet, as a result of the collisions.

Powerful Submarines Join Israel’s Navy

The new Tanin (Crocodile) submarine en route to Israel from Germany. Image by Israel Defense Forces

The Israel Navy’s fourth submarine, the ISS Tanin (Crocodile), is expected to become fully operational in a few weeks and participate in naval operations. The nuclear-capable submarine boasts an array of sophisticated weaponry, as well as the latest in intelligence-gathering technology. It stands at a whopping 68 meters long, compared to 57.3 meters on average for other submarines. The navy’s fifth submarine, meanwhile, is expected to arrive this summer, and is now in the final stages of construction at the Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft (HDW) shipyards in Kiel, Germany.

Tidewater Service Contractors Elect Vice President

John Pyron, Vice President of W R Systems Ltd. and Director of Federal Business for the Engineering Services Division located in Norfolk, VA, has been elected Vice President of the Tidewater Association of Service Contractors (TASC).  TASC is an organization dedicated to excellence in contracting in the public and private sectors. Pyron is a retired Navy officer who has over 25 years experience in program management and marketing.  

US Navy Admiral to Plead Guilty in Bribery Case

Robert Gilbeau (Photo: U.S. Navy)

A U.S. Navy rear admiral will plead guilty on Thursday to lying to federal investigators, making him the highest-ranking officer to be convicted in the expanding "Fat Leonard" bribery case, the Washington Post reported, citing his attorney. Robert Gilbeau, a special assistant to the chief of the Navy Supply Corps, was scheduled to appear in U.S. District Court in San Diego late Thursday afternoon, the Post reported, citing court records. This would bring to 14 the number of people charged in the Singapore-based case…

Report: China Wants to Bolster Naval Power

The Chinese president, Hu Jintao, has called on top military commanders to build a powerful navy, the state media reported as China continues to spend heavily on a modern, blue-water fleet. In a speech to navy officers attending a Communist Party meeting Wednesday, Hu said China was an important maritime nation and the navy should be ready to protect the country's interests at any time, according to reports. His comments also reinforce the views of senior Chinese military officers who argue that China needs a navy that can deploy far from the country's coastline to protect its huge maritime, trade including crucial imports of oil and raw materials. China has a fleet of more than 50 submarines, including modern Russian and domestic designs, that could pose a major threat to U.S.

China Criticizes US over Maritime Patrol Proposal in South China Sea

Vice Adm. Robert Thomas, commander of U.S. 7th Fleet: US Navy Photo

China asked the United States to take no position on the South China Sea issue after US Navy Officer Robert Thomas promised to back the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in patrolling areas of the waterway. "We hope the United States will strictly honor its commitment of not taking positions or sides on territorial sovereignty issues," said Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hong Lei. The U.S. navy officer suggested on Tuesday that the Southeast Asian countries form a combined maritime force to patrol areas of the South China Sea.

NASSCO Delivers USNS Matthew Perry

General Dynamics NASSCO, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD), delivered USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9) to the U.S. Navy. The ship is named in honor of Commodore Matthew C. Perry (1794-1858), the U.S. Navy officer who established American trade with Japan in the mid-19th Century. NASSCO began construction of USNS Matthew Perry in April 2008. The 689-ft-long supply ship will serve under the Navy’s Military Sealift Command. The ship is capable of delivering almost 10,000 tons of dry cargo and petroleum products at one time to U.S. Navy and allied ships underway at sea. Including the Matthew Perry, NASSCO has delivered nine T-AKEs, which are also known as Lewis and Clark-class ships.

Merchant Marine Reserve Program becomes Strategic Sealift Officer Program

After extensive coordination with several Navy organizations and the U.S. Maritime Administration, the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics approved revisions to the latest CNO Instruction (OPNAVINST 1534.lD) transitioning the Merchant Marine Reserve (MMR) Program into the Strategic Sealift Officer Program (SSOP) on June 10. The SSOP supports national defense sealift requirements and capabilities, which are executed by Military Sealift Command (MSC). The program provides the Navy with officers that possess sealift, maritime operations, and logistics subject matter expertise, and further hold U.S. Coast Guard credentials as merchant marine officers.

This Day in Naval History - Sept. 05

From the Navy News Service 1775 - Adoption of first uniforms for Navy officers. 1813 - USS Enterprise captures HM brig Boxer off . 1918 - USS Mount Vernon torpedoed by German submarine off . 1923 - U.S. Asiatic Fleet arrives at , to provide medical assistance and supplies after Kondo Plain earthquake. 1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders Navy to form a neutrality patrol to report the presence of foreign warships within 300 miles of eastern . 1946 - USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB 42) and four escorts visit to underscore support for the Greek government, which faced a communist insurgency. 1990 - USS Acadia (AD 42) departs for first war-time deployment of mixed gender crew on combat vessel.  

This Day in Coast Guard History – May 24

1830-Navy officers, under furlough from the Navy until April 1832, were given commissions in the Revenue Service. 1941-CGC Modoc sighted the German battleship Bismarck while the cutter searched for survivors of a convoy southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland.  British Swordfish torpedo planes from the Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Victorious circled Modoc as they flew towards the German battleship's position.  The Modoc's crew then spotted the flashes caused by anti-aircraft fire from the Bismarck and then sighted British warships on the opposite horizon.  The cutter then maneuvered to avoid contact with any of the warships and managed to steam out of the area unscathed. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)

This Day in Naval History - Feb. 22

1865 - A Union squadron under the command of Rear Adm. David Dixon Porter bombards and captures Wilmington, N.C. 1870 - After arriving on USS Nipsic, the Darien Expedition, commanded by Cmdr. Thomas O. Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay. The exhibition then surveys the Isthmus of Darien, Panama, for an interoceanic ship canal. 1909 - The "Great White Fleet" returns to Hampton Roads, Va., from its historic around-the-world cruise. 1943 - USS Iowa (BB 61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battleships, is commissioned. 1974 - Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes the first Navy officer designated as a female aviator. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval Historical Center Web site at www.history.navy.mil.

Indian Navy's New Warship Runs Aground

INS Kamorta: Photo credit Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers

The 'INS Kamorta', the first in a class of Indian Navy's ambitious Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Corvettes, under construction at the Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE) shipyard ran aground on in the River Hooghly near Geonkhali in East Midnapore, while on sea trials, reports 'The Times of India'. Citing Navy officers, the newspaper reports that as the ship was negotiating the bends and bars of the Hooghly, its engines seem to have failed. Its steering gear also got jammed and it moved away from the navigation channel and got grounded near the shore at Geonkhali.

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 5

USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB-42. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Today in U.S. 1923 - U.S. Asiatic Fleet arrives at Yokohama, Japan, to provide medical assistance and supplies after Kondo Plain earthquake. 1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders Navy to form a Neutrality Patrol to report the presence of foreign warships within 300 miles of eastern United States. 1946 - USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB-42) and four escorts visit Greece to underscore U.S. support for the Greek Government which faced a Communist insurgency. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

SevenCs Appoints New Sales Director

Bjoern Roehlich, Sales Director

Hamburg based SevenCs has appointed Bjoern Roehlich as Sales Director. Bjoern, who started his career as a German Navy Officer, brings extensive experience in the ECDIS, VTS and simulator-markets to SevenCs. Most recently he was Managing Director of a leading European ECDIS training provider. Commenting on the new appointment Jochen Rudolph, Managing Director of SevenCs, said: "We are delighted to have Bjoern joining the team. His background as a navigating officer, combined with his extensive industry experience…

This Day in Naval History - Feb. 22

From the Navy News Service 1865 - A Union squadron under the command of Rear Adm. David Dixon Porter bombards and captures Wilmington, N.C. 1870 - After arriving on USS Nipsic, the Darien Expedition, commanded by Cmdr. Thomas O. Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay. The exhibition then surveys the Isthmus of Darien, Panama, for an interoceanic ship canal. 1909 - The "Great White Fleet" returns to Hampton Roads, Va., from its historic around-the-world cruise. 1943 - USS Iowa (BB 61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battleships, is commissioned. 1974 - Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes the first Navy officer designated as a female aviator.

British Private Navy Warship Held in Spain

An ex-Royal Navy officer’s converted warship has been seized by Spain amid fears he is a mercenary planning to fight pirates in Somalia. Former lieutenant Chris Enmarsh’s decommissioned gunboat Defender has been stopped from sailing since being forced to stop off in Tenerife for repairs. The Spanish authorities are understood to be concerned that Mr Enmarsh and his five-man crew intend to operate as so-called guns-for-hire protecting oil platforms off the coastline of East Africa, reports the Daily Mail. The 127ft boat was built in Lowestoft, Suffolk, in the mid-Seventies as a fast attack craft for the Sultan of Oman’s navy in the Gulf. Itwas decommissioned in 2002, and Mr Enmarsh is thought to have bought it two years ago.

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 5

Today in U.S. 1923 - U.S. Asiatic Fleet arrives at Yokohama, Japan, to provide medical assistance and supplies after Kondo Plain earthquake. 1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders Navy to form a Neutrality Patrol to report the presence of foreign warships within 300 miles of eastern United States. 1946 - USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB-42) and four escorts visit Greece to underscore U.S. support for the Greek Government which faced a Communist insurgency. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.

U.S. Navy Officer Guilty of Bribery

Second U.S. Navy Officer Indicted on Related Bribery Charges. A commander in the U.S. Navy pleaded guilty to federal bribery charges today, admitting that he provided a government contractor with classified ship schedules and other internal U.S. Navy information in exchange for cash, travel and entertainment expenses, as well as the services of prostitutes. A second U.S. Navy officer was also indicted today on related bribery charges by a federal grand jury in the Southern District of California. Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

Subscribe
Maritime Reporter E-News subscription

Maritime Reporter E-News is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for Maritime Reporter E-News