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Sunday, January 21, 2018

Navy Recruiting News

Libyan Navy Visits British Training Base

Commodore Hassan Ali Bushnak (Center) Photo credit: UK MOD

The delegation led by Commodore Hassan Ali Bushnak, Chief of Staff of the Libyan Naval Force, forms part of a wider visit by the Libyan delegation to the Royal Navy in the UK to build relations, offer opportunities, and to help understand the enormous challenges Libya faces in creating a modern naval force. During their time at HMS Raleigh in Torpoint the visitors were able to see recruits undergoing their 10-week initial naval training course. The visitors were shown the facilities used to teach recruits how to safely handle and fire the SA80 rifle and first aid training.

Australian Navy Role-models Boosted by Graduation

Past graduates of the Defence Indigenous Development Program (DIDP), also graduated from General Entry 346 Emms Division at Recruit School, HMAS Cerberus, Victoria. Photo: Royal Australian Navy.

Eleven Indigenous young men and women graduated from Navy Recruit training in one hit on October 13 in front of family, friends and the Chief of Navy. For Seaman Star Marine Technician Jeff Andrews, the hard work was well worth the effort. Awarded 'Recruit of the Intake' and 'Sportsperson of the Intake', Seaman Andrews impressed staff through his exemplary performance, outstanding attitude, his skill at motivating others and in helping fellow Recruits achieve their goals. “I had several attempts to get into Navy before being accepted by the Defence Indigenous Development Program – Navy…

Australian Navy Recruit School Graduates First Shipp Division

Photo: Royal Australian Navy

For the first time in the history of the Royal Australian Navy’s Recruit School, a recruit division named after a sailor, rather than an officer, graduated today. Eighty recruits were welcomed into the Navy from Shipp Division, named after the late Leading Seaman Noel Ervin Shipp, during a Graduation Parade for General Entry class 314 that was held at HMAS Cerberus. Shipp joined the Royal Australian Navy on January 10, 1963, as an underwater control rating. He then transferred to the aircrewman category in July 1967…

MCPON Launches eSailor Initiative at RTC

Master Chief Petty Officer, Mike Stevens hands recruits the first issuance of mobile devices during the launch of eSailor at Recruit Training Command. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Martin L. Carey

The Navy's top enlisted Sailor, Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike D. Stevens, was on hand to distribute the first electronic tablets (e-tablets) to the Navy's newest recruits at Recruit Training Command (RTC), April 7. The launch of the eSailor initiative is a pre-pilot, beta testing to two divisions of 70 recruits to help determine how well the device integrates into the training environment at RTC. The e-tablet will contain RTC curriculum, including training videos, texts and access to professional development websites.

Navy Reaches for Desired Strength by '08

With the Navy’s Fleet of the future established, and seeing cost-savings platforms being delivered to the Fleet, the Navy announced Feb. 5 the plan to reach an end strength number of 328,4000 for active duty and 67,800 for reserves in 2008, reaching a floor of approximately 322,000 for active duty and 68,000 for reserves in 2013. “Now that we have future fleet defined – 313 ships and about 3,800 aircraft – we are able to define the work and identify requirements,” said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. John C. Harvey Jr. By partnering with the Navy enterprises, there is a much better understanding of the work requirement across platforms and jobs, at sea and ashore.

Cheyenne Navy Week Kicks Off

Richard Kaysen, mayor of Cheyenne, Wyo., welcomes Rear Adm. Michael S. White, commander of Naval Education and Training Command, and all other U.S. Navy participants to the official start-up event for Cheyenne Navy Week at

Rear Adm. Michael White, commander, Naval Education Training Command, from Denver, accepted a proclamation from Cheyenne's Mayor Richard Kaysen during the Cheyenne Navy Week Kick-Off Concert, July 14. The Kick-Off Concert featured U.S. Navy Band Southwest's Brass Quintet and their popular music group the "Destroyers," as well as a screening of "Top Gun". "We here in Cheyenne are proud to be one of 12 cities chosen to host Navy Week," the mayor said. More than 150 residents came to show their support to their Navy, while also enjoying the festivities.

Warship Open Day in Cairns

HMAS Parramatta fires its 5 inch gun onto Lancelin Range as part of a naval gunfire support serial during Exercise Ocean Explorer 17. Photo: Royal Australian Navy

The people of Cairns will have a rare opportunity to tour HMAS Parramatta comes alongside Trinity Wharf and opens its gangway to the public on Monday, 17 April, says a press release of Royal Australian Navy. One of the sailors who will be on board to show people around is former Cairns local, Able Seaman Boatswains Mate Thomas Ketchell. “I am extremely proud to be a member of ship’s company in HMAS Parramatta and I have been given some fantastic opportunities to see not only Australiabut the world,” he said.

Navy to Drop Anchor in Tucson

The Navy Office of Community Outreach (NAVCO) and Navy Recruiting District (NRD) Phoenix are partnering to celebrate Tucson Navy Week, from March 14 through March 20. Tucson Navy Week is a week-long series of awareness events held in conjunction with Major League Baseball Spring Training and Aerospace & Arizona Days. Participating Navy assets include: the Blue Angels; a namesake visit by crew members of USS Tucson (SSN 770); F/A-18 flight simulator; Navy dive tank and Navy Band Southwest. Vice Adm. Evan Chanik, U.S. 2nd Fleet Commander, will also be participating at events during the week. “We’re extremely excited and proud of the Navy assets that will be visiting Tucson and surrounding communities,” said Cmdr. Pamela Holland, commanding officer, NRD Phoenix.

"River Cities" Host First Navy Week of 2015

Official U.S. Navy file photo of the U.S. Navy parachute demonstration team, the Leap Frogs.

Bossier City-Shreveport Navy Week begins April 27 and will continue through May 3. Navy Weeks focus a variety of assets, equipment and personnel on a single city for a week-long series of engagements designed to bring America's Navy closer to the people it protects, in cities that don't have a large naval presence. The events and special programs to be held throughout the "River Cities" are the culmination of planning and preparation over many months by the Navy Office of Community Outreach, multiple Navy assets and community leaders.

Damen Names Royal Oman Navy Flagship

Image courtesy Damen

Dignitaries from the Ministry of Defense of Oman joined senior Damen management at a ceremony at Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding, Vlissingen on May 8 to mark the naming of the Royal Navy of Oman’s new flagship, the Sail Training Clipper Shabab Oman II. The 87m long steel-hulled vessel is a three-mast, full square rigger built to design principles set for the iconic tea clippers of the 19th century, benefiting from 21st century technology and comfort. Featuring a fully unfurled sail area of 2,700m2, the vessel can accommodate 34 navy recruits plus a 58-strong crew.

National Museum of the American Sailor Unveiled

The National Museum of the American Sailor name change signals a shift in vision from a regional focus to one that depicts the diverse history of Sailors who have served in the U.S. Navy. (U.S. Navy photo)

The Great Lakes Naval Museum was officially renamed the National Museum of the American Sailor during a ceremony and sign unveiling at the museum July 4. The Navy's top enlisted Sailor, Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens, was joined by retired Rear Adm. Sam Cox, director of Naval History and Heritage Command, North Chicago Mayor Leon Rockingham, Capt. James Hawkins, commanding officer of Naval Station Great Lakes, Jennifer Searcy, Ph.D., director of the National Museum of the American Sailor…

Making Civilians into Sailors

Recruit Division 191 enters the USS Midway Ceremonial Drill Hall at the beginning of a pass-in-review graduation ceremony at Recruit Training Command.

At Recruit Training Command, they transform civilians into basically trained, physically fit, well disciplined Sailors – 39,000 of them each year. They are trained by a cadre of fleet experienced enlisted Sailors who must meet stringent screening standards and embody our Navy core values of honor, courage and commitment. The Command continually looks for talented 2nd and 1st class petty officers, chiefs and senior chiefs to become recruit division commanders and basic naval orientation instructors, tasked with forging the next generation of Sailors.

Navy Announce Sequestration Response

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announces the Navy will go ahead with spending reductions to meet fiscal constraints imposed by sequestration. a.  Shut down carrier air wing two (cvw-2) in april. f.  Return USS Thach (FFG 43) to homeport early from deployment to SOUTHCOM. a.  Begin negotiating contract modifications to de-obligate efforts for any investment programs for which the remaining unobligated balance will be insufficient after the sequestration reduction is applied. e.. f.  Cancel march navy recruiting media support and reduce the majority of advertising contracts as much as possible under contractual conditions. These actions are being taken to preserve support for those forces stationed overseas and currently forward-deployed.

NAVADMIN Soliciting Sailors for RDC Duty

Chief Boatswain's Mate Ludwik Dyrkacz, a recruit division commander, ensures the proper fit of Seaman Recruit Madeleine Bohnert's white enlisted hat, or Dixie cup, during uniform issue at Recruit Training Command. Bohnert was among the first female recruits to be issued the Dixie cup as part of the Navy's efforts for uniformity in service members' uniforms. (U.S. Navy photo by Sue KrawczykReleased))

The Navy is recruiting Sailors to become recruit division commanders (RDCs) at Recruit Training Command, the Navy's only boot camp, and Officer Training Command, as announced in the NAVADMIN 042/17 message, released Feb. 23. Chief of Naval Personnel, Vice Adm. R. P. Burke, in the message calls on Navy leadership to canvass their top-quality enlisted personnel and encourage them to consider RDC as their next shore duty choice. The job of an RDC is not easy shore duty. The hours are long…

Trayer Commissioned at RTC

Sailors salute while manning the rails of USS Trayer (BST 21) during the commissioning ceremony for the Navy's newest simulator. Trayer, along with Battle Stations 21, is the culmination of all training received at the Navy's only boot camp. The simulator is a grueling 12-hour test of a recruit's skills in several shipboard evolutions, including fighting fires and stopping floods. The final evolution, now held entirely in the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer simulator, marks a recruit's final rite of passage into the Navy. U.S. Navy photo by Mr. Scott A. By Scott A. The Navy's newest and largest simulator, USS Trayer (BST 21), was commissioned here June 18.

This Day in Coast Guard History – June 1

1874-The light was first lit at Spectacle Reef Lighthouse, located on a limestone reef at the northern end of Lake Huron, near the Straits of Mackinac, ten miles from land. 1941-The Navy organized the "South Greenland Patrol" that consisted of three cutters and a Navy vessel. 1946-The Coast Guard returned to operation under the Treasury Department after the end of World War II. 1948- The US Coast Guard Training Center at Cape May, New Jersey, was established as a receiving center for the initial classification, outfitting, and indoctrination of recruits. The primary reason for this move from the training station at Mayport, Florida, which was then be decommissioned, was to locate more centrally the Service's facilities for handling recruits.

SECNAV Visits Naval Station Great Lakes

Secretary of the Navy Donald C. Winter visited Naval Station Great Lakes Oct. 10 and met with Sailors and toured Recruit Training Command (RTC) and Training Support Center (TSC). While touring RTC, Winter remarked about the considerable changes at the Navy’s only boot camp. “It’s interesting just to talk to the people in charge and to understand the dynamics of the training process,” Winter said. “I’m very pleased with what I’m hearing in terms of the overall adaptation of the training process to the Navy of the 21st century. RTC is nearly finished with a massive recapitalization program that began after the Navy consolidated all enlisted Basic Training from San Diego and Orlando, Fla., to RTC Great Lakes.

Navy Simulator Wins Award

The Navy's unique, high-tech simulator of shipboard emergencies to test Recruits at Recruit Training Command (RTC) Great Lakes won a national award for construction project excellence Nov. Battle Stations 21's USS Trayer, a life-like mockup of an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer and its surrounding 157,000-square-foot building, was recognized by the Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA) as the best overall design-build project in the United States for 2008, cited for exemplary interdisciplinary teamwork, innovation and problem-solving in creating the one-of-a-kind facility.

RTC, OTC Begin Female Haircut Program

Chief Logistics Specialist Natali Philip, left, a recruit division commander, uses a ruler to measure the hair of Seaman Recruit Briana Cochems, from Los Angeles, to show proper hair grooming standards to new recruits at R

In an effort to standardize training and education across the military services, Recruit Training Command (RTC) and Officer Training Command (OTC) will run a pilot program, which will no longer require female accessions to cut their hair. The pilot program, which will run from January through March 2015, comes after receiving fleet feedback that junior Sailors and officers are not taught proper grooming standards with longer hair. This shift will align the Navy with every other armed forces service, which do not require female accessions to cut their hair.

GE Blog: Navigating through the Rough Seas

Digital Marine Naval Ships (Photo: GE)

No two days in the navy are the same. Whether teams are facing a humanitarian mission, complex manoeuvres or a training exercise, navy recruits must be prepared for all eventualities, pushing their bodies and minds to the limits of their abilities. The same is true of navy fleets. While it is not always possible for operations to know what mission they will be faced with in the future, predicting a potential failure of an asset and maintenance need of individual ships, and therefore enabling better fleet management, can ensure they are best prepared for any mission and eventuality.

Ex-US Navy Officers Face Negligent Homicide Charges over Ship Collisions

Significant visible damage to USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on Aug. 21. (U.S. Navy photo by Madailein Abbott)

The commanding officers of two U.S. Navy destroyers involved in deadly collisions last year in the Pacific Ocean face courts-martial and military criminal charges including negligent homicide, the U.S. Navy said in a statement on Tuesday. Filing charges against the officers marks the Navy’s latest effort to address the problems that led to collisions involving its warships in Asia, in which 17 sailors were killed. The Navy has already dismissed several senior officers, including the commander of the Seventh Fleet, as a result of the collisions.

GE Ships LM2500 Marine Gas Turbine for US Navy

GE LM2500 GT hanging angle shot (Photo: GE Marine)

GE's Marine Solutions division said it has shipped a LM2500 marine gas turbine propulsion module that will help power the U.S. Navy's 75th DDG Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125). Shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries' Ingalls Shipbuilding division will construct this new destroyer with U.S. Navy Flight III upgrades incorporated. Each DDG destroyer features four GE LM2500 marine gas turbines in a combined gas turbine and gas turbine (COGAG) configuration. "Since 1991 - for just the U.S.

New North American Maritime Personnel Recruitment Agency

Flagship Maritime Recruiting focuses on servicing the needs of maritime companies in the USA and Canada. Flagship Maritime Recruiting is founded by shipping professionals and augmented by specialists in the recruitment, human resources (HR), and organizational development (OD) fields giving it the ability to not only identify qualified job candidates, but to match the best candidates to open positions. "Locating well qualified candidates for positions and successfully matching an individual with a maritime company, requires a unique blend of shipping knowledge and recruitment expertise" says David Smith, Master Mariner, co-founder, and President of Flagship Maritime Recruiting. Flagship Maritime Recruiting says it is run by shipping professionals for shipping professionals.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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