Marine Link
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

New Regulations News

Canada Unveils New Arctic Shipping Safety Regulations

Photo: Transport Canada

Canada's Arctic is a vast and diverse region that is an integral part of this country. Marine transportation in the Arctic connects Canada to other countries and provides an essential lifeline for northern communities. To uphold the Government of Canada's high standards for marine shipping in the north, Transport Canada has introduced new Arctic Shipping Safety and Pollution Prevention Regulations. The regulations incorporate the International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (the Polar Code) into Canada's domestic legislation.

Rickmers-Linie Supports Low Sulphur Regime, Expects Cost Hike

Map of the Emission Control Areas (ECA) in the U.S. and Canada as well as North Sea, English Channel and the Baltic Sea

Rickmers-Linie has declared its support for the introduction of stricter sulphur regulations but expects that it will inevitably lead to an increase in the cost of marine fuels. “While shipping is already the most environmentally friendly mode of transport, the new regulations help to further reduce the impact on the environment and our health,” said Ulrich Ulrichs, Chief Executive Officer of Rickmers-Linie. The new regulations come into effect on January 1, 2015 in the Emission Control Areas (ECA) in the U.S. and Canada as well as the North Sea, English Channel and the Baltic Sea.

ABS Rolls Out New Fleet Management Software

(Photo: ABS)

ABS announced the release of its Nautical Systems (NS) Enterprise fleet management software, including NS Insight, a new business intelligence module. The NS solution provides complete capabilities to plan, execute and document all compliance work processes. The release includes a new cloud-based NS Voyage Manager, the latest mobile applications, an expanded NS Autologger, and enhancements to NS Health, Safety, Quality and Environmental (HSQE) Manager. “Effectively managing compliance is a core business objective for our clients,” said ABS Chief Digital Officer, Howard Fireman.

New Regulations to Improve Safety of Tank Barges in Northeast U.S.

The Commander, First USCG District has published the final rule for the increased safety of towing vessels and tank barges operating in the Northeastern U.S. The regional rules will apply to tugs and tank barges operating between Maine and Northern New Jersey. The new regulations create four sets of safety measures for towing vessels and tank barges operating in the waters of the Northeastern U.S. The measures include positive control for barges, enhanced communications, voyage planning and areas of restricted navigation. These measures should reduce the risk of oil spills from the many tank barges operating in the waters of the region, thereby reducing the risk of environmental damage to the unique and sensitive marine environment.

New Regulations to Improve Safety of Tank Barges in Northeast U.S.

The Commander, First USCG District has published the final rule for the increased safety of towing vessels and tank barges operating in the Northeastern U.S. The regional rules will apply to tugs and tank barges operating between Maine and Northern New Jersey. The new regulations create four sets of safety measures for towing vessels and tank barges operating in the waters of the Northeastern U.S. The measures include positive control for barges, enhanced communications, voyage planning and areas of restricted navigation. These measures should reduce the risk of oil spills from the many tank barges operating in the waters of the region, thereby reducing the risk of environmental damage to the unique and sensitive marine environment.

Canada Introduces Regulations to Address Aquatic Invasive Species

Photo: Canada Fisheries and Oceans

The entry into force of new regulations to strengthen the prevention of aquatic invasive species (AIS) in Canadian waters was announced today by Canada’s Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Gail Shea. The Government of Canada, which spends more than $14 million on AIS issues annually, worked with provincial and territorial governments to develop the Aquatic Invasive Species Regulations. The regulations provide tools for both the Department and provinces to prevent the introduction and spread of AIS…

U.S. Coast Guard Focus on Commercial Fishing Boat Safety

The Coast Guard urges commercial fishing vessel operators to undergo mandatory safety examinations prior to enforcement of new regulations. All commercial fishing, fish tender and fish processing vessels that operate or transit more than three nautical miles offshore must demonstrate full compliance with fishing industry vessel safety regulations during a mandatory safety examination. To demonstrate compliance with this new regulation, fishermen are encouraged to contact Coast Guard fishing vessel examiners to obtain a Commercial Fishing Vessel Safety Decal. The examination requirement is one of several new mandates established by the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2010.

Panama Canal Issues Advisory on New Regulation

The Panama Canal Authority issued an advisory stating that vessels stating that vessels bound for the Panama Canal will have to provide their pre-arrival notification 96 hours prior to arrival, rather than 48 hours prior under the old regulation. The new regulation comes into effect on July 1, 2003.

Trash Talk

Are You Prepared for the New MARPOL Annex V Garbage Regulations? New regulations addressing garbage management go into effect on January 1, 2013 pursuant to action taken by the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) at its sixty-second session in July 2011 after a comprehensive review of MARPOL Annex V. The new regulations impose stricter garbage management procedures and documentation requirements for all vessels and fixed and floating platforms which will have major implications for industry, as discussed below.

IMO for Better Regulation

Courtesy Danish Maritime Authority

With a new resolution, United Nations' International Maritime Organization (IMO) stresses the need for better regulation and fewer administrative burdens for the benefit of seafarers, shipowners and administrations alike. At the IMO Council meeting held last week, agreement was reached about a draft resolution establishing that international shipping regulation must be sharper. Already when new regulations are being worded, it must be considered which requirements are imposed on both the seafarers on board the ships and the shipowners' shore-based offices.

Proposed Regulations Regarding Source From Activities in Intl. Waters

The Internal Revenue Service (the "IRS") has issued proposed regulations under section 863 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), providing new rules for determining the source of income from activities conducted in international waters for purposes of U.S. income taxation. These new regulations come shortly after the release last year of regulations under Section 883 of the Code that significantly affected the exemption from U.S. income tax of income from the international operation of a vessel owned by a non-U.S. corporation. While the new regulations also apply to space activities and similar new regulations apply to communication activities, the new rules may have the most significant impact on both U.S.

New European Regs on Ship Recycling

The new European Regulation on ship recycling (Regulation (EU) No 1257/2013) was published on December 10, 2013 in the Official Journal of the European Union and it will enter into force on December 30, 2013. In view of the international importance of the new Regulation GMS followed very closely and contributed advice towards its development. It is paramount that the implementation of the new Regulation by the European Commission in the next two years will be guided by realism and a clear understanding of the dynamics of the industry, and not by the impractical, not thought-out, and irrational campaigns to ban beaching. Over this period the industry will need to be alert so as to contribute its knowledge and guidance to the European Commission.

Liberia: Shipping Does Not Need New Regulations

One of the world’s largest and most active shipping registers, The Liberian Registry, has called on shipping regulators to ensure the effective implementation of existing rules to protect human life, safety and the environment, rather than creating new rules and regulations instead. Scott Bergeron, CEO of the Liberian International Ship & Corporate Registry, the U.S.-based manager of the Liberian Registry, said, “It is the job of ship registries and other regulators to ensure the effective, efficient and practical implementation of rules and regulations. Unfortunately, the entire industry does not operate in this way. There are other regulators who are not enforcing the rules effectively and this is really troublesome because the result of ineffective implementation is yet more regulation.

Ship Safety & Environment – Denmark Pushes IMO for Mandatory Audits

Together with a number of other countries, Denmark is striving to make it mandatory for member states to undergo the so-called 'IMO sudit'. The audit would ensure that  countries implement the obligations following from the international conventions on maritime safety and protection of the marine environment. Until now, the IMO has had a voluntary system. At the meeting, important steps were taken towards making such an audit mandatory so that it would apply to all countries from 2015. At the meeting, work was also being done on new regulations for classification societies, new guidelines for port State control and accident investigation as well as guidelines for how new regulations on marine equipment must apply to ships under construction.

U.S. Offshore Oil Drilling Rule Planned

Offshore fire courtesy CMMI

The United States is planning to impose a major new regulation on offshore oil and gas drilling to try to prevent the kind of explosions that caused the catastrophic BP Plc oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, the New York Times reported on Friday, citing Obama administration officials. The Interior Department could make the announcement as early as Monday, the paper said. It is timed to coincide with the five-year anniversary of the BP disaster, which killed 11 men and sent millions of barrels of oil spewing into the gulf.

ClassNK Releases New Rule Amendments

Noboru Ueda, Class NK Chairman & President

ClassNK (Chairman and President: Noboru Ueda) has announced the release of new amendments to the ClassNK Rules on June 15, 2012. ClassNK constantly reevaluates its Technical Rules and Guidances in order to respond to requests from the maritime industry, incorporate R & D results and feedback from damage investigations, and address new regulations as well as amendments to international conventions and IACS unified requirements. The full text of these amendments is available on…

American Salvage Association to Consider Non-Tank VRP's

One issue on the conference agenda will be the new regulations for Non-Tank Vessel Response Plans (VRPs). On March 9, 2013, the OPA 90 Vessel Response Plan regulatory package outlining requirements for non-tank vessels trading in U.S. waters was approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), jumping the last hurdle before publication on or around June 9, 2013. The new regulations address the need to identify appropriate response resources, including diving, salvage, firefighting or lightering equipment and personnel, within VRPs. Questions on what this means for response to non-tank vessel casualties will be examined at the conference.

Amendments to MARPOL Annex I Go into Effect in August

force. New regulation 12A, on oil fuel tank protection, adopted by MEPC 54 on March 24, sets out the requirements concerning the location of oil fuel tanks in all ships with an aggregate oil fuel capacity of 600m3 and above and which are delivered on or after 1 August 2010. In this context, "ship delivered on or after 1 August 2010" also refers to a ship for which the building contract is placed on or after 1 August 2007 or, in the absence of a contract, its keel is laid on or after 1 February 2008. The new regulation will, therefore, be immediately applicable for all categories of ships "on the drawing board" with oil fuel tanks of 600 m3 capacity, or more. located inside the double hull, thus helping prevent spillages of oil fuel in case of collision or grounding.

California – Ballast Water Management

The California State Lands Commission (SLC) issued a Letter to Shipping Agents stating that, effective March 22, it will commence enforcement of new Ballast Water Management Regulations. The new regulations apply to vessels arriving in California carrying ballast water from another port or place within the Pacific Coast Region. These regulations supplement current regulations that apply to vessels arriving in California from ports or places outside the Pacific Coast Region. Source: HK Law

Ballast Water Treatment – USCG Amending Regulations

USCG to amend regulations on BWT systems, allowable concentration living organisms The Coast Guard is amending its regulations on ballast water management by establishing a standard for the allowable concentration of living organisms in ships' ballast water discharged in waters of the United States. The Coast Guard is also amending its regulations for engineering equipment by establishing an approval process for ballast water management systems. These new regulations will aid in controlling the introduction and spread of nonindigenous species from ships' ballast water in waters of the United States.  

Lloyd’s Register Spreads the Word on Maritime Safety

to SOLAS Chapter XI, which now includes a new International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. On Monday this week, Lloyd's Register held the first in a global program of practical seminars aimed at helping the marine industry understand the implications of the new Regulations. for ISM. as a difficult subject. Piraeus, Hong Kong and Singapore. Speaking after the seminar, Captain Andy Mitchell, Head of Lloyd's Register's Marine Management Systems group commented; "Maritime security is often portrayed as a complicated subject, so it important that the industry takes a practical, rather than a bureaucratic, approach. assistance with developing and implementing systems to comply with ISPS.

Low Sulphur Fuel Regulation for Cruise Ships at NSW Ports

  The Port Authority of New South Wales (NSW) has issued advice about the Consultation Draft of a new regulation requiring cruise ships to use low sulphur diesel fuel (sulphur content of 0.1% or less) from 1 October. If the regulation is passed, this would be applicable for all cruise ships visiting Sydney Harbour, and then to include all New South Wales ports from 1 July 2016. For information about operations in Australia contact GAC Australia at shipping.australia@gac.com

IMO – Implementation of MARPOL Regulation 13H – Latvia

The IMO issued a Circular forwarding a communication received from the Administration of Latvia stating that Latvia has decided to refrain from using the provisions of paragraphs 5,6, and 7 of new Regulation 13H (Regulation 21 new numbering) of Annex I of the MARPOL Convention for oil tankers entitled to fly its flag. MEPC.1/Circ.492 Source: HK Law

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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